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Converting Assembly Language to VB .NET RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi Expert,

    I have some problem about converting Assembly language to VB .NET(vice versa),  i'd like to create application that converts/reads into String, see sample

    Thanks in advance

    Thursday, May 22, 2014 8:09 AM

Answers

  • Hi Expert,

    I have some problem about converting Assembly language to VB .NET(vice versa),  i'd like to create application that converts/reads into String, see sample

    Thanks in advance

    You simply cannot convert assembly code to VB.

    VB uses behind the scene (even behind ILS) assembly code. Vb is meant to create quicker (and easier to maintain) programs then you ever can do with assembly. 

    Programming with assembly is only still done as it is about things like drivers, which will never be made with VB.

    In a very wide seen analogy you ask how a human can do the same like unicellular organism.

    Moreover, if you program, don't then ask how you can convert things. Mostly the original program has more or less possibilities and you create with converting almost forever a malfunctioning vehicle. Simply tell what you want to achieve.


    Success
    Cor


    • Edited by Cor Ligthert Thursday, May 22, 2014 10:00 AM
    • Proposed as answer by Har Das Saturday, June 7, 2014 12:06 AM
    • Marked as answer by VBcodeHyper Saturday, June 7, 2014 12:07 AM
    Thursday, May 22, 2014 9:58 AM
  • Hi,

    There's a lot of work around about converting the VB to Assembly. because it is particularly a machine code,

    • Marked as answer by VBcodeHyper Saturday, June 7, 2014 12:07 AM
    Saturday, June 7, 2014 12:06 AM

All replies

  • Hi Expert,

    I have some problem about converting Assembly language to VB .NET(vice versa),  i'd like to create application that converts/reads into String, see sample

    Thanks in advance

    You simply cannot convert assembly code to VB.

    VB uses behind the scene (even behind ILS) assembly code. Vb is meant to create quicker (and easier to maintain) programs then you ever can do with assembly. 

    Programming with assembly is only still done as it is about things like drivers, which will never be made with VB.

    In a very wide seen analogy you ask how a human can do the same like unicellular organism.

    Moreover, if you program, don't then ask how you can convert things. Mostly the original program has more or less possibilities and you create with converting almost forever a malfunctioning vehicle. Simply tell what you want to achieve.


    Success
    Cor


    • Edited by Cor Ligthert Thursday, May 22, 2014 10:00 AM
    • Proposed as answer by Har Das Saturday, June 7, 2014 12:06 AM
    • Marked as answer by VBcodeHyper Saturday, June 7, 2014 12:07 AM
    Thursday, May 22, 2014 9:58 AM
  • Hi,

    There's a lot of work around about converting the VB to Assembly. because it is particularly a machine code,

    • Marked as answer by VBcodeHyper Saturday, June 7, 2014 12:07 AM
    Saturday, June 7, 2014 12:06 AM
  • The fact that you are even using VB to begin with, totally confuses me on why you'd be interested in Assembly?
    In other words, all logic has broken down, when you're interested in Assembly Language yet you are clearly a VB guy.

    Additionally it is not worth to ever convert Assembly into VB. Simply never ever worth it. At least if you were interested in converting it to a real programming language like C/C++.

    You have mentioned VB.NET and not VB, which is even worse because you'd have to convert Assembly -> MSIL -> VB.NET.

    Lastly, you've asked to convert Assembly to VB.NET so you can create an application that reads into a string, when all you need to do is create that application in VB.NET to begin with. ;-)

    Wednesday, June 17, 2015 7:21 AM

  • Additionally it is not worth to ever convert Assembly into VB. Simply never ever worth it. At least if you were interested in converting it to a real programming language like C/C++.


    I don't see the sense of posting in this old dead thread. However, C/C++ are not "real" level program languages, but "low" level program languages. (Although C++ can also be used on a high level).

    VB is a high level program language (likewise Java, C# and F#).

     


    Success
    Cor

    Wednesday, June 17, 2015 7:43 AM