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Only IE 6 as a choice RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi, I am new to this program so if i am missing something obvious please be easy on me :)

    I got Expression Studio 3.0 from the webspark program and it includes the superpreview program.. A developer I know showed this tool to me a while ago, and they had alot of choices as to what browser to test, I only have IE6. Am i missing a plugin, do i need to configure something.

    Current setup

    Windows Server 2008

    Visual Studio 2010 / 2008 etc.

    IE 9 installed, as well as Firefox, Opera, Safari, Chrome etc

    But the only browser choice i see in Superpreview is IE6 (which is hopefully going to be removed from the web in the future.)

     

    Thanks in advance

     

    Rob

    PS as far as i know, this is not the trial version. (but how would i check?)

    Thursday, June 23, 2011 8:50 PM

All replies

  • Under the "File" Menu:

    File -> Preview in Browser -> Edit Browser List

     

    Do that and report back.

    Thursday, June 23, 2011 10:25 PM
  • But the only browser choice i see in Superpreview is IE6 (which is hopefully going to be removed from the web in the future.)

    Heh, heh... now, that would be a real trick. IE6 is not "on the Web," and cannot be removed from it. IE6 is, I would guess, primarily on the 60% of corporate desktops still running Windows XP (according to Gartner Group a couple of days ago), and probably a few of the "grandma's computer for her quilting patterns" type installations, on machines of people who don't want or need to upgrade.

    No one has the power to order a browser "removed from the Internet," and even if someone did, it is not capable of enforcement, since the browser is located on individual desktops. We are stuck with IE6 until its share falls low enough that we can justify telling clients that IE6 support is no longer included in standard fees in project estimates. That percentage point depends, I would think, upon the ballsiness of the developer and his relationship with the individual client, and may vary from client to client and project to project.

    cheers,
    scott


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    Thursday, June 23, 2011 10:55 PM
  • That percentage point depends, I would think, upon the ballsiness of the developer and his relationship with the individual client, and may vary from client to client and project to project.

    A point that Kathy and Cheryl have made on many occasions.
    Friday, June 24, 2011 3:56 AM
  • I was using, as is the custom in this particular language, the third-person masculine in a situation where a gender-neutral pronoun would have otherwise been appropriate, if the language had one. As it happens, it does not, as it has not for a number of centuries, and the use of the masculine pronoun, as sexist as it may seem to modern sensibilities, is both accepted by linguists and commonly employed among literate users of the language, which is to say, those who determine what "proper" usage is.

     


    Please remember to "Mark as Answer" the responses that resolved your issue. It is common courtesy to recognize those who have helped you, and it also makes it easier for visitors to find the resolution later.
    Friday, June 24, 2011 5:37 AM
  • ......and "ballsiness"?
    Friday, June 24, 2011 6:43 AM
  • "a situation where a gender-neutral pronoun would have otherwise been appropriate, if the language had one"

    It really needs to be invented!  Long overdue, alas.

    Friday, June 24, 2011 7:13 AM
  • Amazingly the word "BALLSINESS" was not defined on the Urban Dictionary. So I submitted it:

     

    Thanks for your definition of ballsiness!

    Editors reviewed your entry and have decided to publish it on urbandictionary.com.

    It should appear on this page in the next few days:
    http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=ballsiness

    Urban Dictionary

    -----

    ballsiness

    Definition: The human quality leading to bold and aggressiveness action where others dare not.

    Used in Sentence: He was a WEB developer who had the ballsiness not to bother making his pages compatible with IE6.

    Friday, June 24, 2011 4:16 PM
  • Hmmm I wonder if "pussieness" is there with the opposite meaning --



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    Friday, June 24, 2011 6:07 PM
  • I'll tell you the word that needs to be invented. We need a word to take the place of the awkward he/she, his/her construction. "Each student must turn in his or her paper tomorrow." Ewww.

    I have always taught that each requires a singular pronoun to go with it, but come on. We use you and you for both singular and plural.

    I suggest that if there isn't a serviceable s/he substitute term in wide use by the time IE6 is removed from the Web, that we just throw in the towel and accept their as a reasonable usage. Even in English class.


    The bird, the bee, the running child are all the same to the sliding glass door. Dimitri Martin
    Friday, June 24, 2011 7:28 PM
  • All students must turn in their paper tomorrow.

    As for IE 6, in many parts of the world it has 60-80% market share. Course those folks are also using older operating systems, often pirated.


    Free Expression Web Tutorials
    For an Expression Web forum with without the posting issues try expressionwebforum.com
    Friday, June 24, 2011 7:50 PM
  • Sure, changing the sentence to All students...works, but the his/her construction still crops up too much. And even though I am a grammar stickler with an English degree, I think it's silly to insist on not using their when there is no altenative that isn't awkward. This is one instance in which I think we should break the rules in order to make the language evolve (and change closing quotes in a declarative sentences to do it the way the British do).
    The bird, the bee, the running child are all the same to the sliding glass door. Dimitri Martin
    Friday, June 24, 2011 11:53 PM
  • I'm with you on that. Both of them, even though I would have to break my touch-typists' fingers' 50-year habit of closing quotes American style.

    And while we're about it, how about we conjure a new, grammatically acceptable contraction for first person singular state-of-being negation. We have "he/she isn't" for third person, "you aren't" for second person, "we/you/they aren't" for all the plural forms, but for first person singular? I amn't? I aren't? Or how about the old standby, "I ain't?"

    In fact, I vote that we adopt that perfectly easy to pronounce and spell contraction as the officially sanctioned and grammatically correct contraction for "am not." Anybody with me? 

    ;-)

    cheers,
    scott


    Please remember to "Mark as Answer" the responses that resolved your issue. It is common courtesy to recognize those who have helped you, and it also makes it easier for visitors to find the resolution later.
    Saturday, June 25, 2011 1:21 AM
  • "Anybody with me?"

    Well, I amn't, for one, 'specially if it's ain't! I hear ain't enough at work, as well as five women who can't pronounce ask. I'd ax them to not do it, but they'd think I was puttin' on airs.

    By the end of the day, I can feel my ears bleeding from the constant assault upon them.

    Which begs the question, though; should we resurrect daren't and dasn't?


    The bird, the bee, the running child are all the same to the sliding glass door. Dimitri Martin
    Saturday, June 25, 2011 2:56 AM
  • It's nice to have a thread on this "social forum" having to do with nothing in particular.
    Saturday, June 25, 2011 6:29 AM
  • "a situation where a gender-neutral pronoun would have otherwise been appropriate, if the language had one"

    It really needs to be invented!  Long overdue, alas.

    I generally, but not always, use his/her or he/she, etc. But I agree, a gender neutral pronoun would be nice.


    Nancy Ward
    Saturday, June 25, 2011 2:08 PM
  • >Hmmm I wonder if "pussieness" is there with the opposite meaning --
    Very offensive, Clark, very offensive. Wonder why ballsiness doesn't seem so offensive by half?


    Nancy Ward
    Saturday, June 25, 2011 2:10 PM
  • In fact, I vote that we adopt that perfectly easy to pronounce and spell contraction as the officially sanctioned and grammatically correct contraction for "am not." Anybody with me?

    I ain't a gonna fight wit ya on dis one! :)

    Seriously, coming from rural Texas for most of my life, 'ain't' is and always has been, a part of the English language we use. Although I watch my grammar and spelling diligently, when speaking I find myself using rural English more often than not.

    Sooooooo, let's put 'ain't' in the dictionary.


    Nancy Ward
    Saturday, June 25, 2011 2:18 PM
  • It's nice to have a thread on this "social forum" having to do with nothing in particular.

    Sure is, ain't it? Great big :)


    Nancy Ward
    Saturday, June 25, 2011 2:19 PM
  • "Anybody with me?"

    Well, I amn't, for one, 'specially if it's ain't! I hear ain't enough at work, as well as five women who can't pronounce ask. I'd ax them to not do it, but they'd think I was puttin' on airs.

    Well, actually, Bill, it isn't really that far-fetched, nor an original idea of mine. I got it originally from this article by a PhD. in Linguistics. If you see the chart given there, "I am not" is the only negative verb construction for which we do not have a grammatical contraction, and I find the lack perplexing. Why was one never developed over the centuries of use and development of the language?

    Anyway, if we determine that it is time to remedy that lack, then something is going to have to be devised or adopted for the job. I used "amn't" facetiously, to illustrate how difficult of pronunciation it would be, and its just plain silliness when sounded. However, "ain't" exists, is easily pronounceable (too easily, it might appear to some ;-), and not currently being used for any other (grammatical) purpose.

    I see no reason, if it were stipulated, as Dr. Beard recommends, that it only be used with the first-person singular, why "ain't" wouldn't make an ideal candidate for the job. "You ain't," "they ain't," "he, she, or it ain't" would still be considered incorrect and ungrammatical, but "I ain't" could easily provide the missing construct that we're looking for. Do you have any other candidate which would be as suitable?

    cheers,
    scott


    Please remember to "Mark as Answer" the responses that resolved your issue. It is common courtesy to recognize those who have helped you, and it also makes it easier for visitors to find the resolution later.
    Saturday, June 25, 2011 7:25 PM
  • >Hmmm I wonder if "pussieness" is there with the opposite meaning --
    Very offensive, Clark, very offensive. Wonder why ballsiness doesn't seem so offensive by half?


    Nancy Ward

    Actually, I didn't coin the word. Well, perhaps in the noun form, but I first heard the adjective form "ballsy" used in an article, in regard to Carly Fiorina, then-CEO of Hewlett-Packard. IIRC, it had to do with the purchase by HP of Compaq, and with the way she had faced down detractors to the purchase on the HP Board. If memory serves, she carried the day on that one, but it cost her, and I think that she was ousted from HP within a year or so.

    I think that the reason the word doesn't carry an offensive connotation is because it denotes aggressive, bold, even cheeky action, chutzpah if you prefer Yiddish, and is therefore connoted as gender-neutral more for its meaning than as gender-specific because of its (physique-related) root.

    cheers,
    scott


    Please remember to "Mark as Answer" the responses that resolved your issue. It is common courtesy to recognize those who have helped you, and it also makes it easier for visitors to find the resolution later.
    Saturday, June 25, 2011 7:40 PM
  • I think the word connotates testosterone influenced behavior. Maybe even rash and stupid behavior. That has to be somewhat gender biased no?
    Saturday, June 25, 2011 7:52 PM