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Error Parsing an XML RSS feed

    Question

  • Greetings, 

    I don't know where to go to fix my issue. I have tried asking to other forums and no response or very vague response. 

    I have a blog/rss feed that is on our main website, I would like to retrieve the first 5 items for my MVC Public site. I was successful in retrieval and displaying the blog data on my localhost, in both Chrome and IE11. When I deploy it to my server that hosts the QA site, I keep getting the following error: "

    The element with name 'html' and namespace 'http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml' is not an allowed feed format.

    I have searched the blog for this wording and I cannot find it, not another feed works fine. so, I am stumped. 

    Here is my code:

    var blogRoll = new List<BlogData>();
    XmlReaderSettings settings = new XmlReaderSettings();
    settings.DtdProcessing = DtdProcessing.Parse;
    var url = "http://blog.nwf.org/feed/";
    var req = (HttpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create(url);
    req.Method = "GET";
    var rep = req.GetResponse();
    var reader = XmlReader.Create(rep.GetResponseStream(), settings);
    SyndicationFeed feed = SyndicationFeed.Load(reader);
    foreach(var item in feed.Items)
                        {

                            var blog = new BlogData();
                            blog.BlogUrl = item.Id;
                            blog.BlogName = item.Title.Text;
                            string pubDate = item.PublishDate.ToString();
                            blog.BlogDate = Convert.ToDateTime(pubDate);
                            blog.BlogDesc = item.Summary.Text;
                            blogRoll.Add(blog);


                        }

                    

                ViewBag.blogRoll = blogRoll;
                return View();

    and for reference, here is my XML:

    <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?><rss version="2.0"
    xmlns:content="http://purl.org/rss/1.0/modules/content/"
    xmlns:wfw="http://wellformedweb.org/CommentAPI/"
    xmlns:dc="http://purl.org/dc/elements/1.1/"
    xmlns:atom="http://www.w3.org/2005/Atom"
    xmlns:sy="http://purl.org/rss/1.0/modules/syndication/"
    xmlns:slash="http://purl.org/rss/1.0/modules/slash/"
    >

    <channel>
    <title>The National Wildlife Federation Blog</title>
    <atom:link href="http://blog.nwf.org/feed/" rel="self" type="application/rss+xml" />
    <link>http://blog.nwf.org</link>
    <description>The National Wildlife Federation&#039;s blog</description>
    <lastBuildDate>Mon, 01 May 2017 15:53:35 +0000</lastBuildDate>
    <language>en-US</language>
    <sy:updatePeriod>hourly</sy:updatePeriod>
    <sy:updateFrequency>1</sy:updateFrequency>
    <generator>https://wordpress.org/?v=4.6.4</generator>
    <item>
    <title>Five Butterfly Garden Tips from a Butterfly Hero!</title>
    <link>http://blog.nwf.org/2017/04/take-your-butterfly-garden-to-the-next-level-5-tips-from-a-butterfly-heroes-superstar/</link>
    <comments>http://blog.nwf.org/2017/04/take-your-butterfly-garden-to-the-next-level-5-tips-from-a-butterfly-heroes-superstar/#comments</comments>
    <pubDate>Wed, 26 Apr 2017 20:09:05 +0000</pubDate>
    <dc:creator><![CDATA[Erin Sweeney]]></dc:creator>
    <category><![CDATA[Garden Habitats]]></category>
    <category><![CDATA[Students and Nature]]></category>
    <category><![CDATA[Butterfly Hero]]></category>
    <category><![CDATA[butterfly heroes]]></category>
    <category><![CDATA[Certified Wildlife Habitat]]></category>
    <category><![CDATA[Genevieve Leroux]]></category>
    <category><![CDATA[habitat]]></category>
    <category><![CDATA[monarch]]></category>
    <category><![CDATA[native plants]]></category>
    <category><![CDATA[Sustainable Gardening]]></category>

    <guid isPermaLink="false">http://blog.nwf.org/?p=127701</guid>
    <description><![CDATA[In 2015, then 9 year-old, Genevieve Leroux from San Luis Obispo, CA pledged to be a Butterfly Hero and help save the monarch butterfly. Not only did she plant the &#8230;]]></description>
    <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>In 2015, then 9 year-old, Genevieve Leroux from San Luis Obispo, CA pledged to be a <a href="http://www.nwf.org/Butterfly-Heroes.aspx">Butterfly Hero</a> and help save the monarch butterfly. Not only did she plant the seeds that came in her Butterfly Heroes Garden Starter Kit and create an amazing habitat for the declining monarch population, but with the help of her mother she took her garden to the next level and became a Butterfly Heroes superstar!</p>
    <p>Does your garden provide habitat for butterflies or other wildlife? Are you wondering how you can take it to the next level? Follow these great tips from Genevieve.</p>
    <h3>Plant Native Plants</h3>
    <div class="wp-caption-wrap"><div id="attachment_127704" style="width: 465px" class="wp-caption alignnone"><img class="wp-image-127704 size-large" src="http://blog.nwf.org/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/BG2-465x620.jpg" alt="BG2" width="465" height="620" srcset="http://b50ym1n8ryw31pmkr4671ui1c64.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/BG2-465x620.jpg 465w, http://b50ym1n8ryw31pmkr4671ui1c64.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/BG2-225x300.jpg 225w, http://b50ym1n8ryw31pmkr4671ui1c64.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/BG2.jpg 678w" sizes="(max-width: 465px) 100vw, 465px" /><p class="wp-caption-text">Genevieve and her milkweed plants &#8211; Photo credit: Kimberlee Leroux</p></div></div>
    <p>Genevieve supplemented the seeds she received in her Butterfly Heroes Garden Starter Kit with native milkweed and native nectar-providing plants for monarchs and other butterflies and pollinators. When it comes to gardening for wildlife, native plants are always your best choice. Native plants are the plant species that are naturally found in your regions and are adapted to your climate, weather conditions, and soil type. Native wildlife and native plants have evolved together and rely on each other for survival. Native plants will attract a variety of native wildlife to your habitat. Genevieve’s favorite thing about her garden is observing the butterflies, lizards, song birds, turkeys and owls that visit.</p>
    <h3>Practice Sustainable Gardening</h3>
    <p>One of the best ways to create a sustainable, environmentally-friendly garden in drought prone regions, such as southern California where Genevieve lives, is by practicing water conservation. Genevieve and her family have done this in several ways:</p>
    <ul>
    <li>Genevieve and her family always choose drought-tolerant natives when planting in their garden. Planting native plants that have evolved to tolerate the dry climate allows for less watering.</li>
    <li>They have installed a drip irrigation system that directly waters the roots which conserves water use by minimizing evaporation.</li>
    <li>The majority of their land is covered with wood chips and bark that retain soil moisture and improve soil quality. Genevieve loves to watch wild turkeys and California towhees scratch around in wood chips searching for food.</li>
    </ul>
    <p>They are also practice organic gardening by never using pesticides or chemical fertilizers of any type, and they supplement their soil with organic compost products.</p>
    <h3>Get the Community Involved</h3>
    <p>Genevieve is a great example of how to get the community involved.</p>
    <ul>
    <li>Genevieve and her family donated milkweed seeds to her school. With the teacher’s help the students helped germinate the seeds and planted the tiny milkweed plants in a section of the school&#8217;s large garden.</li>
    <li>As part of a Jane Goodall Institute Roots and Shoots project called Milkweed for Monarchs, Genevieve germinated 2000 seeds on her own and then gave the milkweed plants away to family and friends so they could start their own butterfly gardens.</li>
    <li>After certifying her garden with the National Wildlife Federation as a Certified Wildlife Habitat, Genevieve and her mom contacted the local newspaper using NWF&#8217;s press release to encourage others to create their own wildlife habitat gardens.</li>
    <li>The next thing they plan to do is contact the mayor of San Luis Obispo, CA and tell her about NWF&#8217;s <a href="http://www.nwf.org/Garden-For-Wildlife/About/National-Initiatives/Mayors-Monarch-Pledge.aspx">Mayor&#8217;s Monarch Pledge</a> program to encourage their town to participate in this wonderful program.</li>
    </ul>
    <h3>Be a Citizen Scientist</h3>
    <p>Genevieve has worked closely with Dr. Francis Xavier Villablanca, PhD. of California Polytechnic State University to test for the prevalence of two parasites that infect and kill the monarch butterflies, the OE parasite and tachnid fly. One of Genevieve’s favorite parts of working with Dr. Villablanca is to gather information on monarch migration by tagging the monarchs in her garden. She is also working with researchers to provide hard data regarding the use of native milkweed vs non-native tropical milkweed and hopes that her garden will help researchers educate the public on the risks and benefits of using both types.</p>
    <div class="wp-caption-wrap"><div id="attachment_127705" style="width: 620px" class="wp-caption alignnone"><img class="wp-image-127705 size-large" src="http://blog.nwf.org/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/BG3-620x464.jpg" alt="BG3" width="620" height="464" srcset="http://b50ym1n8ryw31pmkr4671ui1c64.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/BG3-620x464.jpg 620w, http://b50ym1n8ryw31pmkr4671ui1c64.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/BG3-300x225.jpg 300w, http://b50ym1n8ryw31pmkr4671ui1c64.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/BG3-768x575.jpg 768w, http://b50ym1n8ryw31pmkr4671ui1c64.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/BG3.jpg 783w" sizes="(max-width: 620px) 100vw, 620px" /><p class="wp-caption-text">Genevieve with Dr. Francis Xavier Villablanca and Hannah Brown &#8211; Photo credit: Kimberlee Leroux</p></div></div>
    <p>Are you interested in lending a hand to science put don’t know how to get involved? Follow Genevieve’s lead and participate in a citizen science program such as: Monarch Joint Venture, Monarch Watch, Journey North, Monarch Alert, iNaturalist, and Cornell University&#8217;s Backyard Bird Counts.</p>
    <div class="wp-caption-wrap"><div id="attachment_127722" style="width: 620px" class="wp-caption alignnone"><img class="size-large wp-image-127722" src="http://blog.nwf.org/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/IMG_0771-620x465.jpg" alt="Photo credit: Kimberlee Leroux" width="620" height="465" srcset="http://b50ym1n8ryw31pmkr4671ui1c64.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/IMG_0771-620x465.jpg 620w, http://b50ym1n8ryw31pmkr4671ui1c64.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/IMG_0771-300x225.jpg 300w, http://b50ym1n8ryw31pmkr4671ui1c64.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/IMG_0771-768x576.jpg 768w, http://b50ym1n8ryw31pmkr4671ui1c64.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/IMG_0771-1024x768.jpg 1024w" sizes="(max-width: 620px) 100vw, 620px" /><p class="wp-caption-text">Photo credit: Jason Leroux</p></div></div>
    <h3>Certify your Garden as a Certified Wildlife Habitat</h3>
    <p>Turning your garden or habitat into a <a href="http://www.nwf.org/CertifiedWildlifeHabitat?campaignid=WH17FS9">Certified Wildlife Habitat®</a> is fun, easy and makes a big difference for neighborhood wildlife. Provide the 4 essential habitat elements for wildlife and practice sustainable gardening and you are ready to certify.</p>
    <ul>
    <li><strong><a href="http://www.nwf.org/Garden-For-Wildlife/Food.aspx">Food</a>:</strong> The native plants in Genevieve’s garden provide a variety of food options for wildlife including seeds, berries, fruit, and nectar. She has also supplemented the native plants with bird feeders and hummingbird feeders.</li>
    <li><strong><a href="http://www.nwf.org/Garden-For-Wildlife/Water.aspx">Water</a>:</strong> Genevieve has a small fountain that provides fresh water in her backyard. She also has numerous flat ceramic bird baths located around the property, which she keeps clean for the birds and other wildlife that need a drink.</li>
    <li><strong><a href="http://www.nwf.org/Garden-For-Wildlife/Cover.aspx">Cover</a>:</strong> Mature trees, dense bushes and shrubs, and milkweed in Genevieve’s yard and garden all provide for protection against predators and the elements.</li>
    <li><strong><a href="http://www.nwf.org/Garden-For-Wildlife/Young.aspx">Places to Raise Young</a>:</strong> Genevieve’s milkweed plants are used by monarchs as a host plant for their caterpillars. Her family has installed several nesting boxes for a variety of different wild bird species, including owls.</li>
    <li><strong><a href="http://www.nwf.org/Garden-For-Wildlife/Sustainability.aspx">Practice Sustainable Gardening</a>:</strong> Genevieve and her family conserve water and don’t spray chemical pesticides or fertilizers in their butterfly garden. Mulching helps keep top soil from washing away.</li>
    </ul>
    <p><strong>Certify in your wildlife habitat in May 2017 and save 20% for Garden For Wildlife Month!</strong></p>
    <p style="text-align: center"><a href="http://www.nwf.org/CertifiedWildlifeHabitat?campaignid=WH17FS9" class="button  aligncenter">CERTIFY YOUR GARDEN NOW</a></p>
    ]]></content:encoded>
    <wfw:commentRss>http://blog.nwf.org/2017/04/take-your-butterfly-garden-to-the-next-level-5-tips-from-a-butterfly-heroes-superstar/feed/</wfw:commentRss>
    <slash:comments>1</slash:comments>
    </item>
    <item>
    <title>Real Consequences of Climate Change in Peru</title>
    <link>http://blog.nwf.org/2017/04/real-consequences-of-climate-change-in-peru/</link>
    <comments>http://blog.nwf.org/2017/04/real-consequences-of-climate-change-in-peru/#respond</comments>
    <pubDate>Tue, 25 Apr 2017 16:43:29 +0000</pubDate>
    <dc:creator><![CDATA[Kiryssa Kasprzyk]]></dc:creator>
    <category><![CDATA[Conservation]]></category>
    <category><![CDATA[climate change]]></category>
    <category><![CDATA[climate impacts]]></category>
    <category><![CDATA[endangered species]]></category>
    <category><![CDATA[International Wildlife Conservation]]></category>
    <category><![CDATA[Peru]]></category>

    <guid isPermaLink="false">http://blog.nwf.org/?p=127427</guid>
    <description><![CDATA[On a trip to Peru in March as part of NWF’s International Wildlife Conservation Team, I visited the place I called home for two years while serving as a Peace &#8230;]]></description>
    <content:encoded><![CDATA[<p>On a trip to Peru in March as part of NWF’s International Wildlife Conservation Team, I visited the place I called home for two years while serving as a Peace Corps volunteer – the Pomac Forest Historic Sanctuary. This protected area is part of the Equatorial Dry Forest ecosystem home to several endemic, rare, and endangered species, including the Pampas cat and sandy pygmy rice rat – both on the IUCN Red List of endangered species. It’s well-known as one of the only areas where bird watchers can glimpse the elusive Peruvian plantcutter, Tumbes swallow, rufous flycatcher, or black-faced ibis.</p>
    <div class="wp-caption-wrap"><div id="attachment_127433" style="width: 576px" class="wp-caption alignleft"><img class=" wp-image-127433" src="http://blog.nwf.org/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/wildlife-620x325.jpg" alt="Several endangered species live in this ecosystem, including the Peruvian plantcutter (Phytotama raimondii) and Pampas Cat (Leopardus colocolo). Photo credit: Jorge Montejo (left) and Fabio Colombini (right)." width="576" height="302" srcset="http://b50ym1n8ryw31pmkr4671ui1c64.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/wildlife-620x325.jpg 620w, http://b50ym1n8ryw31pmkr4671ui1c64.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/wildlife-300x157.jpg 300w, http://b50ym1n8ryw31pmkr4671ui1c64.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/wildlife-768x403.jpg 768w, http://b50ym1n8ryw31pmkr4671ui1c64.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/wildlife-1024x537.jpg 1024w, http://b50ym1n8ryw31pmkr4671ui1c64.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/wildlife.jpg 1275w" sizes="(max-width: 576px) 100vw, 576px" /><p class="wp-caption-text">Several endangered species live in this ecosystem, including the Peruvian plantcutter (<em>Phytotama raimondii)</em> and Pampas Cat (<em>Leopardus colocolo</em>). Photos by Jorge Montejo (left) and Fabio Colombini (right).</p></div></div>
    <p>In a normal year, less than 2 inches of rain will fall, but the flora and fauna here are adapted to the hot, dry climate. The mesquite trees that dominate the landscape have ancient taproots to find groundwater or can also go into a dormant phase. The landscape has a unique beauty – a forest in the middle of a desert. It’s no wonder the local pre-Incan cultures built their pyramids here.</p>
    <p>I took a hike up to a lookout I’d been to many times before and saw an alien view: bright greens and yellows dominated the landscape, and trees I’d never seen with leaves were brimming with new growth! There was a lagoon where I was used to seeing dust! The unfamiliar view was beautiful, but also scary given the cause.  Climate change threatens this unique place and its inhabitants with extreme weather – both severe droughts and rainy seasons – and this year the dry forest has received 10 times more rain than normal.</p>
    <div class="wp-caption-wrap"><div id="attachment_127428" style="width: 805px" class="wp-caption alignright"><img class=" wp-image-127428" src="http://blog.nwf.org/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/mirador-620x234.jpg" alt="View from the lookout at the Pomac Forest Historic Sanctuary shows the impacts of recent extreme rainfall in Peru. The photo on the left shows the typical view (2013) and on the right with heavy rain (2017). Photo credit: Kiryssa Kasprzyk" width="805" height="304" srcset="http://b50ym1n8ryw31pmkr4671ui1c64.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/mirador-620x234.jpg 620w, http://b50ym1n8ryw31pmkr4671ui1c64.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/mirador-300x113.jpg 300w, http://b50ym1n8ryw31pmkr4671ui1c64.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/mirador-768x289.jpg 768w, http://b50ym1n8ryw31pmkr4671ui1c64.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/mirador-1024x386.jpg 1024w, http://b50ym1n8ryw31pmkr4671ui1c64.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/mirador.jpg 1465w" sizes="(max-width: 805px) 100vw, 805px" /><p class="wp-caption-text">View from the lookout at the Pomac Forest Historic Sanctuary shows the impacts of recent extreme rainfall in Peru. The photo on the left shows the typical view (2013) and on the right with heavy rain (2017). Photos by Kiryssa Kasprzyk</p></div></div>
    <p>I stood there wondering: Has climate change has altered this view forever? As the temperature rises and precipitation swings to the extremes, new flora and fauna will take over. The amazing wildlife that have called this forest home for centuries will be forced to find new places to call home… if such places still exist. And how many natural disasters – like floods and mudslides – will my friends who call this place home suffer at the hands of climate change – their lives and livelihoods shattered? The forest, animals, and people all need us to take action to protect these natural treasures against the threats of climate change.</p>
    <p><strong>TAKE ACTION: <a href="https://online.nwf.org/site/Advocacy?cmd=display&amp;page=UserAction&amp;id=2347">Urge Congress to support efforts that protect people and wildlife from climate change.</a></strong></p>
    <p><strong>People and wildlife suffer when climate science is denied </strong></p>
    <p>My experience in the dry forest was only a small part of my first hand experiences with the real costs of climate denial: extreme rainfall events in Peru since January 2017 have severely damaged infrastructure, crops, and wildlife habitat across the country, leaving over 100 dead and estimates of 700,000 homeless. While attending meetings in Lima, the news of devastating floods and mudslides added a very real reminder of the urgency of our work to protect our climate and end tropical deforestation (one of the top sources of global carbon emissions).</p>
    <div class="wp-caption-wrap"><div id="attachment_127432" style="width: 496px" class="wp-caption alignleft"><img class=" wp-image-127432" src="http://blog.nwf.org/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/trujillo-620x414.jpg" alt="Flooding and landslides have destroyed homes, infrastructure, crops, and wildlife habitat - like in this photo taken outside of Trujillo in northern Peru. Source: New York Times " width="496" height="331" srcset="http://b50ym1n8ryw31pmkr4671ui1c64.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/trujillo-620x414.jpg 620w, http://b50ym1n8ryw31pmkr4671ui1c64.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/trujillo-300x200.jpg 300w, http://b50ym1n8ryw31pmkr4671ui1c64.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/trujillo-768x512.jpg 768w, http://b50ym1n8ryw31pmkr4671ui1c64.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/trujillo-1024x683.jpg 1024w, http://b50ym1n8ryw31pmkr4671ui1c64.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/trujillo-750x500.jpg 750w, http://b50ym1n8ryw31pmkr4671ui1c64.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/trujillo.jpg 1557w" sizes="(max-width: 496px) 100vw, 496px" /><p class="wp-caption-text">Flooding and landslides have destroyed homes, infrastructure, crops, and wildlife habitat &#8211; like in this photo taken outside of Trujillo in northern Peru. Source: <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2017/04/06/world/americas/peru-floods-mudslides-south-america.html?_r=0">New York Times</a></p></div></div>
    <p>I visited Peru during what has been one of its wettest rainy seasons on record, which is coming on the heels of one of the driest years in recent history causing a “weather whiplash” – or back-to-back opposite extreme weather events. Climate change models for Peru predict an increase in both extreme rainfall and drought conditions, which also increases the risk for the kind of severe flash flooding that has rocked the majority of the country over the past several months.</p>
    <p>The recent extreme rainfall has been caused by atypical warming of the water off the Pacific coast of Peru, similar to an El Niño event, but with localized rather than global effects. The warmer seas and atmosphere mean that Peru is seeing many more rainy days than normal, and the rain is falling more intensely than usual. In the past three months, Peru has recorded 10 rare “extremely rainy” events – which occur less than 1% of the time – stretching from the southern state of Cusco to the northern states of San Martin and Cajamarca.</p>
    <div class="wp-caption-wrap"><div id="attachment_127429" style="width: 446px" class="wp-caption alignright"><img class=" wp-image-127429" src="http://blog.nwf.org/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/ssts-620x453.jpg" alt="Daily measuremetns show temperatures 4 °C above average in the Pacific Ocean of the coast of Peru. Source: NOAA/NWS/NCEP/ EMC Marine Modeling &amp; Analysis Branch" width="446" height="326" srcset="http://b50ym1n8ryw31pmkr4671ui1c64.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/ssts-620x453.jpg 620w, http://b50ym1n8ryw31pmkr4671ui1c64.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/ssts-300x219.jpg 300w, http://b50ym1n8ryw31pmkr4671ui1c64.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/ssts-768x561.jpg 768w, http://b50ym1n8ryw31pmkr4671ui1c64.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/ssts-1024x747.jpg 1024w, http://b50ym1n8ryw31pmkr4671ui1c64.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/ssts.jpg 1207w" sizes="(max-width: 446px) 100vw, 446px" /><p class="wp-caption-text">Daily measurements show temperatures 4 °C above average in the Pacific Ocean of the coast of Peru. Source: NOAA/NWS/NCEP/ EMC Marine Modeling &amp; Analysis Branch</p></div></div>
    <p>The torrential rains have not only affected Peru, but have also caused damage across Colombia, Ecuador, and Bolivia. Over 250 people died as the town of Mocoa, Colombia was buried by a landslide on March 31. The downpours have caused mudslides and flash floods, as the water falls on normally bare mountainside and rivers break their banks, washing away homes, roads, bridges, and trucks.</p>
    <p>Poorly planned growth and development in Peru means the damage is concentrated in areas built on mountainsides, riverbanks, or floodplains, but urban and rural areas have suffered alike. Several of the biggest cities have experienced almost-daily flooding.  Cosmopolitan Lima was cut off from water during our trip, and people all over the country have been stranded without relief. Traditional Peruvian homes made from adobe (mud) bricks have had no chance of withstanding day after day of rain.</p>
    <p>The devastation in Peru is especially hard-hitting for me, as my friends and former neighbors and work partners are struggling to get by.  Some have lost everything. During my visit, the impacts were stark. The rushing water, mud, and debris have ripped giant craters through places I once tread daily. Some old work colleagues distributed food and clothing, but it will take years for my community to recover from the damage wrought by the rain and flooding.</p>
    <div class="wp-caption-wrap"><div id="attachment_127431" style="width: 474px" class="wp-caption alignleft"><img class=" wp-image-127431" src="http://blog.nwf.org/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/zaranda-620x414.jpg" alt="Food and clothing are distributed to a community affected by the flooding. Photo by Kiryssa Kasprzyk" width="474" height="316" srcset="http://b50ym1n8ryw31pmkr4671ui1c64.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/zaranda-620x414.jpg 620w, http://b50ym1n8ryw31pmkr4671ui1c64.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/zaranda-300x200.jpg 300w, http://b50ym1n8ryw31pmkr4671ui1c64.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/zaranda-768x513.jpg 768w, http://b50ym1n8ryw31pmkr4671ui1c64.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/zaranda-1024x684.jpg 1024w, http://b50ym1n8ryw31pmkr4671ui1c64.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/zaranda-750x500.jpg 750w, http://b50ym1n8ryw31pmkr4671ui1c64.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/11/files/2017/04/zaranda.jpg 1489w" sizes="(max-width: 474px) 100vw, 474px" /><p class="wp-caption-text">Food and clothing are distributed to a community affected by the flooding. Photo by Kiryssa Kasprzyk</p></div></div>
    <p>At the same time I was seeing the reality of climate change disaster in Peru, the Trump Administration was getting ready to issue its Executive Order on climate, flying in the face of science, public opinion, and the reminders that climate change is impacting people and wildlife every day. NWF highlighted in our recent blogs how these <a href="http://blog.nwf.org/2017/03/executive-order-undermining-carbon-pollution-threatens-progress-for-wildlife/">climate policy rollbacks</a> will <a href="http://blog.nwf.org/2017/04/climate-policy-rollbacks-create-disasters-not-jobs/">create disasters for people and wildlife</a> across the United States – but they will also be felt around the world. Without action, these consequences will only continue to cause irreparable loss to wildlife and communities least-able to afford it.</p>
    <p>&nbsp;</p>
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    • Moved by 宝宝徐 Wednesday, May 3, 2017 5:25 AM
    Tuesday, May 2, 2017 1:10 PM

All replies

  • Hi,

    This forum is discussing Visual Studio WPF/SL Designer, Visual Studio Guidance Automation Toolkit, Developer Documentation and Help System, and Visual Studio Editor. I will move your thread to corresponding forum.

    Best regards,

    Joyce

     


    Please remember to click "Mark as Answer" the responses that resolved your issue, and to click "Unmark as Answer" if not. This can be beneficial to other community members reading this thread. If you have any compliments or complaints to MSDN Support, feel free to contact MSDNFSF@microsoft.com.

    Wednesday, May 3, 2017 5:23 AM
  • Hi Paul T. Rykiel,

    Thank you for posting here.

    For your question, I do not have a good understanding about what you want.

    Do you mean you want to download the xml from the page and then find something in xml?

    And what data you want to get?

    What 5 items you want to retrieve? Where you the error?

    If I misunderstand what you want, please provide more details.

    Best Regards,

    Wendy


    MSDN Community Support
    Please remember to click "Mark as Answer" the responses that resolved your issue, and to click "Unmark as Answer" if not. This can be beneficial to other community members reading this thread. If you have any compliments or complaints to MSDN Support, feel free to contact MSDNFSF@microsoft.com.

    Wednesday, May 3, 2017 8:01 AM
    Moderator