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What is the difference between ldap and active directory and will authenticating using ldap will authenticate the user against the active directory? RRS feed

  • Question

  • User-1725039537 posted

    HI,

     

    What is the difference between ldap and active directory and will authenticating using ldap will authenticate the user against the active directory?

     

    Thanks in advance.

    Wednesday, September 11, 2013 4:45 AM

Answers

  • User-1635195291 posted

    Hi digish,

    Active Directory is a database based system that provides authentication, directory, policy, and other services in a Windows environment

    LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol) is an application protocol for querying and modifying items in directory service providers like Active Directory, which supports a form of LDAP.

    Short answer: AD is a directory services database, and LDAP is one of the protocols you can use to talk to it.

    More:

    .LDAP is a protocol for retrieving information from a directory service like Active Directory
    2.LDAP is much older than Active Directory and a huge part of Active directory comes from LDAP
    3.Active Directory is from Microsoft while LDAP is the result of an industry effort
    4.Active Directory is usually seldom found outside the Windows operating system
    5.Active Directory provides additional services aside from LDAP like functionality

    Read more: Difference Between LDAP and Acitve Directory | Difference Between | LDAP vs Acitve Directory http://www.differencebetween.net/technology/difference-between-ldap-and-acitve-directory/#ixzz2ee1msjmk

    And for 2nd Question:

    Hope this helps.

    Thanks,

    Jatin

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Wednesday, September 11, 2013 11:16 PM
  • User2019981500 posted

    Hi,

    What i could sense is that you are confused about ldap and active directory or may be the person who has assigned you this task was not sure abt differences.Fact is that you  authenticate against Active Directory using the Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) which if you have done is fine and needs nothing more.

    see how you can authenticate against Active Directory using the Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP).

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms180890%28v=vs.80%29.aspx

    regards

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Wednesday, September 11, 2013 11:48 PM

All replies

  • User2019981500 posted

    here is explaination from stackoverflow

    <div class="post-text">

    Active Directory is built on top of LDAP, just like HTTP is built on top of TCP. You can't make any meaningful comparisons.

    Saying LDAP authenticates is like saying the HTTPS charges your credit card when you're buying something online. The LDAP protocol provides the information to the directory server which does the authentication, just like HTTPS provides your information to the processing server that does the processing.

    Active Directory allows you to have multiple objects in a domain with the same CN, as long as they don't have the same parent. What it restricts is multiple objects with the same sAMAccountName attribute in the same forest.

    Maybe you are interested in the features that Active Directory has that other Directory Services don't? Or how Active Directory uses LDAP to perform higher level authentication requests like username 

    Windows authentication just uses normal windows logins.

    Active Directory is an official Microsoft technology which makes use of LDAP and others:

    LDAP is an underlying, standardised protocol:

    If they said do it using LDAP then I think thats a good place to start :)



    Wednesday, September 11, 2013 4:51 AM
  • User-1725039537 posted

    I need to aunthenticate using ldap and active directory. I have done the ldap part. I am getting confused on, Should I do anything more to authenticate using acitvate directory. that Is why I aksed, is there any difference.

    Wednesday, September 11, 2013 10:07 AM
  • User-1635195291 posted

    Hi digish,

    Active Directory is a database based system that provides authentication, directory, policy, and other services in a Windows environment

    LDAP (Lightweight Directory Access Protocol) is an application protocol for querying and modifying items in directory service providers like Active Directory, which supports a form of LDAP.

    Short answer: AD is a directory services database, and LDAP is one of the protocols you can use to talk to it.

    More:

    .LDAP is a protocol for retrieving information from a directory service like Active Directory
    2.LDAP is much older than Active Directory and a huge part of Active directory comes from LDAP
    3.Active Directory is from Microsoft while LDAP is the result of an industry effort
    4.Active Directory is usually seldom found outside the Windows operating system
    5.Active Directory provides additional services aside from LDAP like functionality

    Read more: Difference Between LDAP and Acitve Directory | Difference Between | LDAP vs Acitve Directory http://www.differencebetween.net/technology/difference-between-ldap-and-acitve-directory/#ixzz2ee1msjmk

    And for 2nd Question:

    Hope this helps.

    Thanks,

    Jatin

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Wednesday, September 11, 2013 11:16 PM
  • User2019981500 posted

    Hi,

    What i could sense is that you are confused about ldap and active directory or may be the person who has assigned you this task was not sure abt differences.Fact is that you  authenticate against Active Directory using the Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) which if you have done is fine and needs nothing more.

    see how you can authenticate against Active Directory using the Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP).

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms180890%28v=vs.80%29.aspx

    regards

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Wednesday, September 11, 2013 11:48 PM
  • User-1725039537 posted

    (you  authenticate against Active Directory using the Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) which if you have done is fine and needs nothing more.). So according to you, I need to not do anything more.

    Thursday, September 12, 2013 12:38 AM
  • User2019981500 posted

    right. because LDAP is just light weight protocol over which micrsoft has build its own product called Active directory

    Thursday, September 12, 2013 1:10 AM