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Microsoft Access stops working whenever an application is launched or linked to. RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have a large Access Application that has been regularly extended, modified and updated since it was first created in 1993. The data is all held in SQL Server now but the forms, reports and coding etc. are all in Access. I updated from Access 2003 mdb file format to Access 2010 accdb format about a month ago.

    Since then, on two occasions after a small modification, the application became unusable. When I try to launch the file I get message that Microsoft Access has stopped working and I have to close the program. If I go back to the previous version and try to link to this new version for the purpose of importing the changes I get the same message as soon as I click OK to import (even if I try to import a simple form that hasn't been modified).

    I can open other databases without issue. If I compact and repair the damaged database to a new file, the new file exhibits the same catastrophic behaviour. I am deeply concerned that this should have happened twice inside one month.

    Any suggestions where I should look for the problem?

    Tuesday, September 6, 2011 1:22 PM

Answers

  • The problem turned out to be a software issue that was solved by de-installing Office 2010 and reinstalling it. (a repair did not work)
    • Marked as answer by RuneSlayer Friday, September 9, 2011 4:09 PM
    Friday, September 9, 2011 4:09 PM

All replies

  • I would bet money that it will take less time and effort to rewrite the app than to keep patching it along.

    If that is not an option (and likely not in the short term at least) I would start in several places:

    • Check the references for broken and / or outdated references. For example, make sure your references point to the most current version of the Access engine, ADO, MS Forms, and any other core components. A good way to check this is create a new database and compare the underlying files for the references in the new database to your existing legacy database. Obviously if you are referencing files that do not exist on the client's machine you will have problems.
    • Scrutinze API calls. Going back to 1993, and for many versions in between, lots of things could only be done--or could be done easier by C programmers tinkering in VBA--by using API calls using the Declare statement. Needless to say the Windows OS has changed a lot in the last 18 years, and certain calls that worked 15 years ago may not work now. It is very likely too that tasks that required some huge complicated series of modules with dozens of API calls 10 years ago can now be done with simple, optimized, built-in VBA objects. Since you're using the 2010 office system, spend some quality time with the Access 2010 Developer Reference.
    • Check auto-load logic. If any code is automatically running when the database opens -- and it almost surely is if this an application database -- it's possible an error is occurring in that logic that could be identified and addressed using old-fashioned debugging. Open the database suppressing any auto-run macro / auto-open forms, etc. Then carefully step through any auto-run code by hand (F8 or F11). Be patient and follow through all the buried functions.

    jmh
    • Edited by Joshua Honig Wednesday, September 7, 2011 1:30 AM
    Wednesday, September 7, 2011 1:03 AM
  • Thanks for the advice. I will work through these tips. It may take some time............
    • Marked as answer by RuneSlayer Friday, September 9, 2011 4:06 PM
    • Unmarked as answer by RuneSlayer Friday, September 9, 2011 4:07 PM
    Thursday, September 8, 2011 2:29 PM
  • The problem turned out to be a software issue that was solved by de-installing Office 2010 and reinstalling it. (a repair did not work)
    • Marked as answer by RuneSlayer Friday, September 9, 2011 4:09 PM
    Friday, September 9, 2011 4:09 PM