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disk volume consumption RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hello,

    Could any one get some light in the dark history of .NET Framework space consumption on the HD?

    Trigger for posting this question was an answer to an other question I read on your site, telling that if 3.5 is installed, 2 and 3.0 are not required, since covered in 3.5???

     .NET Framework from 1.1 through 4 (incl. LP NLD) take, as indicated, space like 578,95 MB. All updates do not even show the disk volume taken.

    Is anything available showing what older versions are obsolete and can be removed without jeopardizing correct functioning of the rest?

    Better would be if Microsoft could include automatic removal of obsolete previous issues of an item, like some others do.

    Thanks for help,

    Kind regards.

     

    Saturday, October 22, 2011 11:19 PM

Answers

  • I think what pvdg42 means by "you must have 2.0 and 3.0 previously installed" meant that .NET 3.5 includes both 2.0 and 3.0 and cannot exist without those two frameworks.  So, it's impossible to have 3.5 and not 2.0 and 3.0.  That's why I said "it actually includes 2.0, 3.0 and 3.5".  

    That being said, you don't have to actually install 2.0, then 3.0, and then finally 3.5.   If you only install 3.5 on a machine that didn't have any other frameworks, it would in effect install 2.0, 3.0 , and 3.5 all at once.  That also means you can't uninstall just 2.0, or just 3.0, if you have 3.5 installed.

    The is different from .NET 4.0, because when you install it, it only installs 4.0, not 3.5 and earlier. 

    But the bottom line is, .NET 3.5 and .NET 4.0 both include much of the base functionality of most applications you'll see today, and you're going to need to keep those on your machine with all the latest service packs to be able to keep your current and future software running.

     


    Tom Overton
    • Proposed as answer by Alexander Sun Monday, October 24, 2011 8:21 AM
    • Marked as answer by Flysenior Monday, October 24, 2011 10:49 PM
    Sunday, October 23, 2011 1:01 AM
  • The differences between Tom's and my responses is semantic, not substantive.

    The fact is that .NET 3.0 and 3.5 are not complete frameworks, despite the fact that the installers include prerequisites in case they are needed. You *can* install .NET Framework 2.0 by itself:

    http://www.microsoft.com/download/en/details.aspx?displaylang=en&id=19

    You can then *add* 3.0:

    http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=70848

    and 3.5:

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/netframework/cc378097

    The latter two installers are cumulative and intelligent in that they will install the prerequisite 2.0 (and 3.0 in the case of 3.5) if not found on the system where the installer is being run.

    I will reiterate Tom's bottom line:

    "But the bottom line is, .NET 3.5 and .NET 4.0 both include much of the base functionality of most applications you'll see today, and you're going to need to keep those on your machine with all the latest service packs to be able to keep your current and future software running."

    and add that you may need to keep 1.1 as well. It's quite possible that, despite its age, you have software that requires that version. As you may have noticed, 1.1 is miniscule in comparison to the newer versions anyway.


    One last thought: All this talk of installing (or, uninstalling) .NET Frameworks is becoming moot, as newer Windows versions include multiple .NET Framework versions installed as part of the OS installation process.

    Vista includes 2.0/3.0

    Win 7 includes 2.0/3.0/3.5 through 3.5 SP1

    Win 8 will include (if the Developer Preview serves as a predictor) 2.0/3.0/3.5 through 3.5 SP1 (optionally) and 4.0/4.5 (again, 4.5 extends 4.0. It is not a separate framework)

     


    • Edited by pvdg42 Sunday, October 23, 2011 1:24 PM
    • Proposed as answer by Alexander Sun Monday, October 24, 2011 8:21 AM
    • Marked as answer by Flysenior Monday, October 24, 2011 10:49 PM
    Sunday, October 23, 2011 1:12 PM

All replies

  • Hi Flysenior,

    Actually no older version will be obsolete, because the way .NET applications work is they get compiled to use a certain framework and that framework must be installed on your computer to run the program.  .NET Framework's are not cumulative.   Meaning for example, .NET 4.0 does not include 1.1 through 4.0.  It only includes .NET Framework 4.0.  

    .NET Framework 3.5 is sort of the odd one though, because it actually includes .NET 2.0, 3.0, and 3.5.  So the general rule is this:

    1.  If you need to run an application that was built under .NET Framework 1.1, you need to have .NET Framework 1.1 installed on your machine.

    2.  If you have an application that was built under .NET Framework 2.0, 3.0, or 3.5 then you must have .NET Framework 3.5 installed.

    3.  If you have an application that was built under .NET Framework 4.0, then you need to have .NET Framework 4.0 installed.

    So, as you can see, it's a good idea just to keep all your frameworks in place and not mess with trying to uninstall any of them to save space.  Because you never know when you'll download or need a program that specifically requires a certain version of the .NET Framework.

    If you're truly short on disk space, the only framework I might say is okay to uninstall is .NET Framework 1.1.  Not many applications still use that version.  However, it's hard to know which applications will break if you uninstall it, so it's better to be safe and keep it there.  


    Tom Overton
    • Edited by Tom_Overton Saturday, October 22, 2011 11:34 PM
    Saturday, October 22, 2011 11:27 PM
  • Whoever said " telling that if 3.5 is installed, 2 and 3.0 are not required, " is badly misinformed. Actually, the truth is quite the opposite.

    .NET Framework 2.0/3.0/3.5 is *all ONE framework*. 2.0 is the base, full, framework. 3.0 and 3.5 are extensions to 2.0 and cannot exist by themselves. To have 3.5 (an extension to 2.0) you MUST have 2.0 and 3.0 previously installed.

    As of today, there have been four (4) complete .NET Frameworks released.

    1.0

    1.1

    2.0/3.0/3.5

    4.0

    It appears that you have three of them installed, presumably to support various programs that you have on your computer. If you try to remove .NET Frameworks you have installed, you may well find that software you use every day will no longer work.

    As you seem to be concerned about disc space, I recommend that you ask in the Microsoft Answers forums for your Windows version about safe ways to recover disc space:

    http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us

    Saturday, October 22, 2011 11:37 PM
  • Thank you for fast response.

    However, Both answers raise "frowns".

    ".NET Framework 3.5 is sort of the odd one though, because it actually includes .NET 2.0, 3.0, and 3.5."

    in Tom Overton's reply, I can not see compliant with the statements by pvdg 42.

    ".NET Framework 2.0/3.0/3.5 is *all ONE framework*. 2.0 is the base, full, framework. 3.0 and 3.5 are extensions to 2.0 and cannot exist by themselves. To have 3.5 (an extension to 2.0) you MUST have 2.0 and 3.0 previously installed.".

    Nevertheles I will try to find the "triggering" message and see to post the essence of it, as this might help prevent confusion in the future.

    Thank you very much again and

    Kind regards.

    Sunday, October 23, 2011 12:51 AM
  • I think what pvdg42 means by "you must have 2.0 and 3.0 previously installed" meant that .NET 3.5 includes both 2.0 and 3.0 and cannot exist without those two frameworks.  So, it's impossible to have 3.5 and not 2.0 and 3.0.  That's why I said "it actually includes 2.0, 3.0 and 3.5".  

    That being said, you don't have to actually install 2.0, then 3.0, and then finally 3.5.   If you only install 3.5 on a machine that didn't have any other frameworks, it would in effect install 2.0, 3.0 , and 3.5 all at once.  That also means you can't uninstall just 2.0, or just 3.0, if you have 3.5 installed.

    The is different from .NET 4.0, because when you install it, it only installs 4.0, not 3.5 and earlier. 

    But the bottom line is, .NET 3.5 and .NET 4.0 both include much of the base functionality of most applications you'll see today, and you're going to need to keep those on your machine with all the latest service packs to be able to keep your current and future software running.

     


    Tom Overton
    • Proposed as answer by Alexander Sun Monday, October 24, 2011 8:21 AM
    • Marked as answer by Flysenior Monday, October 24, 2011 10:49 PM
    Sunday, October 23, 2011 1:01 AM
  • The differences between Tom's and my responses is semantic, not substantive.

    The fact is that .NET 3.0 and 3.5 are not complete frameworks, despite the fact that the installers include prerequisites in case they are needed. You *can* install .NET Framework 2.0 by itself:

    http://www.microsoft.com/download/en/details.aspx?displaylang=en&id=19

    You can then *add* 3.0:

    http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=70848

    and 3.5:

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/netframework/cc378097

    The latter two installers are cumulative and intelligent in that they will install the prerequisite 2.0 (and 3.0 in the case of 3.5) if not found on the system where the installer is being run.

    I will reiterate Tom's bottom line:

    "But the bottom line is, .NET 3.5 and .NET 4.0 both include much of the base functionality of most applications you'll see today, and you're going to need to keep those on your machine with all the latest service packs to be able to keep your current and future software running."

    and add that you may need to keep 1.1 as well. It's quite possible that, despite its age, you have software that requires that version. As you may have noticed, 1.1 is miniscule in comparison to the newer versions anyway.


    One last thought: All this talk of installing (or, uninstalling) .NET Frameworks is becoming moot, as newer Windows versions include multiple .NET Framework versions installed as part of the OS installation process.

    Vista includes 2.0/3.0

    Win 7 includes 2.0/3.0/3.5 through 3.5 SP1

    Win 8 will include (if the Developer Preview serves as a predictor) 2.0/3.0/3.5 through 3.5 SP1 (optionally) and 4.0/4.5 (again, 4.5 extends 4.0. It is not a separate framework)

     


    • Edited by pvdg42 Sunday, October 23, 2011 1:24 PM
    • Proposed as answer by Alexander Sun Monday, October 24, 2011 8:21 AM
    • Marked as answer by Flysenior Monday, October 24, 2011 10:49 PM
    Sunday, October 23, 2011 1:12 PM
  • pvdg42 and Tom Overton,

    Thank you both very much for the very clear and enlighting response.

    Feal much less stressed now :-)

    Kind regards,

    Flysenior


    Kind regards.
    Monday, October 24, 2011 10:54 PM