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  • Question

  • Greetings,

    Last night I was trying to make a design that looked something like an outline of a Palladium-style window.  For the top I drew 2 ellipses, aligned the centers, and using the 12:00 position as my registration point rotated one ellipse 34 degrees and the other -34 degrees.  I made a rectangle and positioned it so that it fell in line with the outside lines of the ellipses about 3/4 of the way toward the bottom of the ellipses.

    I then took the scissors tool and clipped and deleted the top line of the rectangle, as well as the interior intersecting lines of the ellipses. 
    I grouped all of the remaining parts together. I was then left with my basic Palladium window outline and nothing inside - or so I thought.

    When I tried to apply a gradient fill to this design, I was left with a triangular space from where I had clipped the top line of the rectangle to the interior intersecting lines of the ellipses - and there was nothing I could do short of making a triangle to fit that area to fill it with color.

    Now, I thought that Expression Design would respond similar to Photoshop 6.0 and just fill all of that open area.  But this isn't Photoshop and it didn't fill the area.  So my question is, what command can I use so that I can fill the entire area with a uniform gradient fill?

    BTW, I used the ellipses and rectangle because I am not good enough to do a freestyle drawing and use anchor points to evenly and symmetrically make the design I want.  It's sort of like the "spade" or flower that someone had in one of the tutorials.  I couldn't draw that 'spade' or flower for the life of me so I had to use the supplied base design.

    Peace,

    Phroneo   

    Phroneo
    Wednesday, June 25, 2008 2:57 PM

Answers

  • Hi Phroneo,

    No need to cut with the scissors, just select all three objects and use Object>Path Operations>Unite.  This will 'merge' all objects forming a single closed object which you can fill.  The Path Operations option is great for creating complex shapes by uniting, subtracting, intersecting and dividing basic shapes.  Check the Help file, if you need additional help, let me know.

    Regards,


    ~Fred
    • Proposed as answer by Fred C_ Wednesday, June 25, 2008 6:44 PM
    • Marked as answer by Lori DirksModerator Sunday, November 23, 2008 2:04 AM
    Wednesday, June 25, 2008 6:42 PM

All replies

  • Hi Phroneo,

    No need to cut with the scissors, just select all three objects and use Object>Path Operations>Unite.  This will 'merge' all objects forming a single closed object which you can fill.  The Path Operations option is great for creating complex shapes by uniting, subtracting, intersecting and dividing basic shapes.  Check the Help file, if you need additional help, let me know.

    Regards,


    ~Fred
    • Proposed as answer by Fred C_ Wednesday, June 25, 2008 6:44 PM
    • Marked as answer by Lori DirksModerator Sunday, November 23, 2008 2:04 AM
    Wednesday, June 25, 2008 6:42 PM
  • Hello Fred,

    Thank you for your response to my post.  It worked - sort of, mostly, but not on my first pass.

    As I did the last time, I drew an ellipse and <ctrl-c><crtl-f> so that I had two, one on top of the other.  I used the 12:00 position as the registration point for both and swung one to the right 34 degrees and the other to the left -34 degrees.  I arranged them so that it appeared as it the top was rounded.  I then added a rectangle so that it fell in line with the outside lines of the ellipses about 7/8 of the way down.

    After this was complete, I followed your suggestion and
    selected all three objects and used Object>Path Operations>Unite.  This left the same (similar) triangle shape in the design where the ellpses and rectangle intersected.  This was locked into the object itself and at first I couldn't figure out a way to eliminate it. So I made it work within my design.

    What is interesting about this artifact is that I cannot select it to fill it with color and if I put a layer underneath of it, the color of the layer doesn't show through.  Because this particular object is a smaller part of a larger design, I was able to apply a Gaussian blur to it that filled up most of the space and looked good.

    Just as I was beginning to write this to you, I got the idea that I could use the 'lasso' tool to select this triangle artifact and delete it.  It was tricky, though, because I had to start and end the 'lasso' inside of the triangle in order to bring it outside to select all three sides.  This worked and I was able to end up with a completely empty object in which I can use a gradient fill.

    Thank you for your suggestion.  I'm not an artist by any stretch of the imagination.  But what I'm finding is that by having followed almost all of the very good tutorials posted here on this forum, I am slowly but surely begining to be able to 'see' things and translate them into computer art.  It has helped my web site design, as well.

    My last point is that the folks here who moderate and/or submit are very helpful and don't put newbies like me down.  It really helps when one can ask a simple question and know that you're not going to get beat up.  Thank you.

    Peace,

    Phroneo

    Phroneo
    Thursday, June 26, 2008 2:38 AM
  • You may want to take some time to play around with all of the options on the action bar under the Path drop down. I use compound a lot as well as unite and when creating something along the lines you have described then typically I would use compound for the cut out bits. Just create some shapes and play around with the options. The user manual is pretty reasonable with these menu items. 
    steve http://x-coders.com/blogs/barkest/
    Thursday, June 26, 2008 7:41 AM
  • Phroneo said:

    "After this was complete, I followed your suggestion and selected all three objects and used Object>Path Operations>Unite.  This left the same (similar) triangle shape in the design where the ellpses and rectangle intersected.  This was locked into the object itself and at first I couldn't figure out a way to eliminate it. So I made it work within my design."

    <snipped>

    "My last point is that the folks here who moderate and/or submit are very helpful and don't put newbies like me down.  It really helps when one can ask a simple question and know that you're not going to get beat up.  Thank you."



    That's  easy to fix, Phroneo.  You have inadvertently created a compound object.  Think of it as a hole in the larger object. 

    To eliminate the 'triangle':
    Select the (compound) object and use Object>Compound Path>Release (or Control + Shift +8) and the triangle will be released and then it can be deleted.  The overall 'window' shape remains.

    Re: "My last point":  You're welcome! Just happy to help; don't hesitate to ask questions.  We'll try our best to answer them.

    Regards,


    ~Fred
    Thursday, June 26, 2008 3:39 PM