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I'm not a Developer, Just an Average User - Do I even Need .NET? RRS feed

  • Question

  • I was helping a friend get some MS updates for her system and noticed that she had several versions of .NET on her computer: 1.1, 2.0, & 3.0, along with Service Pack 1 for 2.0 & 3.0 (1 SP each).  I uninstalled the older versions of .NET and then downloaded & installed v3.5, assuming that the latest version would be the "best" and most secure/stable.  I then started to ponder whether she (or I) even needed .NET at all.  We are both average computer users and mostly like to surf the web etc.  We're not developers by any means.  What are the advantages of having .NET for us, if any?  If my friend should keep v3.5 can she uninstall the Service Packs for versions 2.0 & 3.0 (these are now uninstalled)?  Thank you.

    Wednesday, January 23, 2008 3:36 PM

Answers

  • Hi

     

    Actually, .NET Framework 1.1 and .NET Framework 2.0 or later use two different core runtime(.NET Framework 1.1 uses CLR v1.1 while .NET Framework 2.0/3.0/3.5 use CLR v2.0)

    One doesn't need to worry about which version of .NET Framework there as an average user, no stability concern, no security concern (in fact, as an experienced/advanced user, one could configure Code Access Security(CAS) in .NET Framework 1.1/2.0 Configuration in Control Panel, if .NET Framework installed)

    When one gets .NET 1.1 application run on the machine, it requires .NET Framework 1.1 installed and .NET 2.0/3.0/3.5 Framework need compatible version of .NET Framework installed and they work side by side.

    And .NET Framework 3.5 regard .NET Framework 2.0/3.0 sp1 as prerequisites, so one cannot keep 3.5 without these sp1s.

    By the way, Vista or late Windows is with .NET 3.0 as one of its components.

     

    All in all, as average users, we don't need to care much about this, but if you are more than just users as .NET developers, you must take different deployment scenarios into consideration.

     

    To better understand .NET Framework naming and version information, I suggest: http://www.danielmoth.com/Blog/2007/06/net-framework-35.html

     

    Thanks

    Friday, January 25, 2008 3:12 AM

All replies

  • certain programs will require .net to run

    • Proposed as answer by tggr Wednesday, February 25, 2009 4:22 AM
    Wednesday, January 23, 2008 4:21 PM
  • Can you give me some examples?

    • Proposed as answer by tggr Wednesday, February 25, 2009 4:07 AM
    Wednesday, January 23, 2008 10:25 PM
  •  

    I guess in most cases  the software itself will install the framework if needed.
    Wednesday, January 23, 2008 10:49 PM
  • I, too, have the same questions that were asked in this thread.  I am not a software developer and question if I even need to have .NET framework installed.  I have no reason to not leave it installed except to free up additional space on my drive.  I have version 3.0 and version 2.0 loaded and would like to know if I need to have both versions, or if version 3.0 will supersede all that version 2.0 had to offer.  For instance, would an application that was created in version 2.0 run with version 3.0 software.

     

    • Proposed as answer by mbell72 Saturday, November 20, 2010 7:38 AM
    Thursday, January 24, 2008 12:46 AM
  • It would be nice to see a reply from someone at Microsoft for this topic.  Meanwhile, here are some interesting (?) MS articles:

     

    Introducing the .NET Framework 3.0 - http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa479861.aspx

    Packaging and Deploying .NET Framework Application - http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa309395(VS.71).aspx

    Introducing the .NET Framework 3.5 - http://download.microsoft.com/download/f/3/2/f32ff4c6-174f-4a2f-a58f-ed28437d7b1e/Introducing_NET_Framework_35_v1.doc

     

     

    Friday, January 25, 2008 12:12 AM
  •  Bruno_1 wrote:

     

    I guess in most cases  the software itself will install the framework if needed.

     

    So, in your opinion, I can safely uninstall all versions of .NET and just wait to see if a web site requires it?  Would this be for surfing only or does this scenario apply primarily to downloadable software?

    Friday, January 25, 2008 12:25 AM
  • im not sure about .net v3, but .net v2 will run a check before uninstalling to see if any programs will become unfunctional when u uninstall
    Friday, January 25, 2008 1:14 AM
  • Hi

     

    Actually, .NET Framework 1.1 and .NET Framework 2.0 or later use two different core runtime(.NET Framework 1.1 uses CLR v1.1 while .NET Framework 2.0/3.0/3.5 use CLR v2.0)

    One doesn't need to worry about which version of .NET Framework there as an average user, no stability concern, no security concern (in fact, as an experienced/advanced user, one could configure Code Access Security(CAS) in .NET Framework 1.1/2.0 Configuration in Control Panel, if .NET Framework installed)

    When one gets .NET 1.1 application run on the machine, it requires .NET Framework 1.1 installed and .NET 2.0/3.0/3.5 Framework need compatible version of .NET Framework installed and they work side by side.

    And .NET Framework 3.5 regard .NET Framework 2.0/3.0 sp1 as prerequisites, so one cannot keep 3.5 without these sp1s.

    By the way, Vista or late Windows is with .NET 3.0 as one of its components.

     

    All in all, as average users, we don't need to care much about this, but if you are more than just users as .NET developers, you must take different deployment scenarios into consideration.

     

    To better understand .NET Framework naming and version information, I suggest: http://www.danielmoth.com/Blog/2007/06/net-framework-35.html

     

    Thanks

    Friday, January 25, 2008 3:12 AM
  • Figo Fei,

     

    Thank you for that detailed answer.  As an average user should .NET 2.0 + SP1 be adequate?  I also have Security Update KB928365.  Also, if a person has .NET 3.5 will they also need 2.0 & 3.0 along with the Service Packs?

    Friday, January 25, 2008 4:59 PM
  • .Net 3.5 requires .Net 2.0 and 3.0 and their respective service packs.

     

    It's hard to say what an average user needs; it all depends on the applications that they want to run.

     

    Hope this helps,

    Nick Doty - MSFT

    Saturday, January 26, 2008 2:49 AM
  •  Nick Doty - MSFT wrote:

     

    It's hard to say what an average user needs; it all depends on the applications that they want to run.

     

    Hope this helps,

    Nick Doty - MSFT

     

    Hi Nick,

     

    No offense to you at all, but your reply really did not help one bit.  This is what I hate about .NET: how am I supposed to know which apps are affected or need .NET?  Do I need .NET for "general" web surfing?  I don't usually blindly download stuff that I know nothing about but when I got .NET over a year ago I mostly did it so that Windows Update would stop telling me that I needed it.  Honestly, I still don't know what .NET does (can anyone give a one paragraph summary in non-techie speak...please?).  I know that other members have provided more MS links in this thread but I don't have time to read all of that, especially when it primarily applies to developers who will use .NET to create their websites.

     

    I'm sorry if I sound irritated but, well, I am.  Not with this board's members and their helpful (to a point) advice but rather my irration is with Microsoft who seemingly insists that all users need .NET and then fails to convincingly and, in "plain English," explain why.  That's my opinion - I could be wrong.

    Saturday, January 26, 2008 6:06 PM
  • My apps include:

     

    Office 2003

    ESET Smart Security Suite

    Spybot-S&D

    SpywareBlaster

    Ad-Aware

    IrfanView

    Firefox

    IE 7

    Opera

    CCleaner

    ImgBurn

    iNet Protector

    RoboForm

    Comodo Firewall Pro

    Nokia PC Suite

    ProcessGuard (free)

    Gadwin PrintScreen

     

     

     

    Saturday, January 26, 2008 6:13 PM
  • In short, .NET Framework is only needed where you need to run/develop .NET application.

     

    As to your question "Do I need .NET for "general" web surfing?"

    The answer is nope. What Web surfing as a client user needs is a Browser, even the website is developed by ASP.NET, no need to have .NET Framework installed on client machine (but we have to installed on the server which we don't need to worry about as a web surfer ).

     

    Hope it is clearer.

     

    Thanks

    Monday, January 28, 2008 3:38 AM
  •  

    I really appreciate you saying this T.mifune.  It seems many of them do give answers...yet some talk with that "Techo talk and some of us just don't understand1  Especially with Microsoft updates..you click on the info to get more info into what you are downloading..and they don't give you enough clarification as to what it is you are updating.  And all those updates...take up so much space!

     

    It would make things so much easier...if those who answer our questions...make it plain...without a whole lot of other URL's to click on!  I was wondering the same thing about this .NET Framework  1. then 2.0  and rather I needed this.  It takes up 88mb.

    Monday, February 4, 2008 11:02 PM
  • Dear T.mifune, lifeeternal3

    a) if a website requires it, the server that hosts that website will use the .NET framework, stored on that server, to compile (generate, think about how it should be in your case) HTMLcode, then sends that stream of HTMLcode back to your browser and your browser displays it on your screen.  Since your not a developer, you will not need the .NET on your computer to ever watch a website... However

    b) Any program (once again: we're talking about offline programs here, on your local harddisk or wherever but not websites) made with .NET cannot work without the .NET framework.  The .NET framework is nothing more then a whole collection of libraries, big how-to-do-this and how-to-make-that's for programs.  For instance a program, made in a .NET language, will tell a window to have a textbox.  The program, once you run it, will then look in the .NET library and find out how to draw it (aha, its a big grey rectangle), and that you can have text in it, etc etc...   So yes, as stated before, most programs that rely on .NET will make sure that you have .NET installed on your system...

     

    Important is to understand that any program that requires .NET only looks certain info up in it's library.  The fact that the library is on your computer or not, will not increase or decrease how fast your computer works, but deleting it from your computer involves the risk of some programs not working anymore...

     

    Since you stated you are an average user, I can imagine your HardDisk having a couple of dozens of Mb's to spare to have .NET installed, even if no programs use it.

     

    Having said that (and I hope my use of language was nor too technical nor too simple), let me turn that question around and throw it right back at you: Do you really need to uninstall .NET?

     

     

     

     

    One more small remark for lifeeternal3, the reason why you'll never get too much info from Microsoft has to do with them trying to keep a) info from the competitors in the softwaremarket (if there are any, but that's a whole other discussion!!) and b) keep security leeks hidden...

    What I mean with that...  Suppose there's a little breach in the security in outlook version x.4 but no one knows about it...  Microsoft makes an update, fixed the breach, and releases an update patch.  You decide not to update today because you are fed up with microsoft not giving enough information about what's happening...  Some weird guy with no life uses reverse engineering to see what the update patch is all about.  He finds out about the security breach in outlook version x.4 and creates a virus.  And since you didn't update...

    Compare it to a newspaper article saying "hmmm everyone needs to bring in their bank cards because although you have a personal PINcode on it, the default code "1234" will work for all cards aswell and we wanna change that"....  Imagine how much money would be gotten stolen from every dissapearing bank card that hasn't updated...

    But getting way off track here.

    Tuesday, February 5, 2008 11:11 AM
  • So, it sounds to me that, if you want to do .Net development work, you need to keep all previous versions of the Framework and their associated Service Packs.  Otherwise, don't worry about it.

     

    I have been trying to download Framework 3.5 and it continues to fail.  I am suspecting that the requirement for fully-updated previous versions of .Net Framework may be the culprit, because Windows Update informs me that I am lacking the following:

    Security Update for .Net Framework Version 1.1 (KB928366)

    .Net Framework 2.0 Service Pack 1 (KB110806)

    Security Update for .Net Framework Version 1 (KB928367)

     

    All of these fail when I try to install them.  My next step, unless someone can advise me otherwise, is to uninstall all the way back to 1.0, then start re-installing in version sequence.

     

    Any advice would be appreciated.

     

    Thanks,

    Tom

    Tuesday, February 5, 2008 11:40 PM
  •    N-Lite requires net 2.0.  Turbo Tax 2008 requires net .20 as well as the net 2.0 service pack 1 installed.

       I never had net 2.0 until recently. (the last few months) I installed net 2.0 to run N-lite and just recently found out that Turbo tax requires net 2.0 with SP1.

       Most programs that require a .net framework will install it or direct you to go to the Microsoft site to get it.

        Net 1.0 and the related service packs and net 2.0 and SP1 are fairly small. And since they have been around for a while you are more and more likely to run into programs that will look for them. And they won't be programs that you might think would need them.

       Why would turbo tax need a .net framework? Who knows... maybe it always did... but we know it requires it now and you can't install Turbo Tax 2008 it until you have it.

       The .net frameworks also appear to be interconnected. 2.0 built on 1.0, 3.0 built on 2.0, and the 3.5 pack says it has fixes for 2.0 as well as 3.0.
       Will a program that says is uses net 3.5 work without 2.0 SP1? Who knows... there may be a piece of 2.0 that is needs. You won't know until the program won't install or won't function. And if 3.5 is installed but 2.0 isn't, the program may not be able to tell you why it doesn't work. It might just crash with no error msg.

        IMO - I would leave net 1.0 and net 2.0 and install the Service packs for them. They've been around awhile and programs that use them are more common. They're also rather small and don't take up much space or resources. But you can probably hold off on net 3.0 and 3.5 until a program you're installing requires one or both.

    That's my 2 cents, I hope it helps.
    Wednesday, February 25, 2009 4:23 AM
  • T.mifune said:

     Nick Doty - MSFT wrote:

     

    It's hard to say what an average user needs; it all depends on the applications that they want to run.

     

    Hope this helps,

    Nick Doty - MSFT

     

    Hi Nick,

     

    No offense to you at all, but your reply really did not help one bit.  This is what I hate about .NET: how am I supposed to know which apps are affected or need .NET?  Do I need .NET for "general" web surfing?  I don't usually blindly download stuff that I know nothing about but when I got .NET over a year ago I mostly did it so that Windows Update would stop telling me that I needed it.  Honestly, I still don't know what .NET does (can anyone give a one paragraph summary in non-techie speak...please?).  I know that other members have provided more MS links in this thread but I don't have time to read all of that, especially when it primarily applies to developers who will use .NET to create their websites.

     

    I'm sorry if I sound irritated but, well, I am.  Not with this board's members and their helpful (to a point) advice but rather my irration is with Microsoft who seemingly insists that all users need .NET and then fails to convincingly and, in "plain English," explain why.  That's my opinion - I could be wrong.


    You can burn a new windows installation without the security pops with N-lite. Its the only way I know to kill the security center.
    Wednesday, February 25, 2009 4:31 AM
  • .NET Framework is required by more & more applications each day, & not all of these programs are ones for developers.
    Some popular programs that require it are:
    Handbrake - Considered by many the best Video software
    Paint.Net - A much much better program than the Paint that comes with Windows
    TurboTax - As mentioned previously

    You need the .NET 1.1, 2.0, 3.0 & 3.5 because it's like a Matched set of lugage, just because you have the big one doesn't mean you don't need the other ones.

    .NET 2.0 Service Pack 2 is 185MB
    .NET 3.0 Service Pack 2 is 179MB
    So they're not small, but if you uninstall them & have to reinstall them you'll have to re-download 'em.
    Most People have HardDrives much bigger than they use so unless you're running out of space I wouldn't suggest uninstalling it.
    A common myth is that having large files on your harddrive slows down your computer, not true unless your harddrive is almost full or those files/programs are being used by your system (Generally the ones in your system tray)
    Saturday, February 13, 2010 7:48 AM
  • Saturday, February 13, 2010 7:48 AM       Outdated info!  Its oct 28,2012!!!
    Sunday, October 28, 2012 11:13 AM