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Will Internet Explorer 10 have the option to disable ClearType (which was removed in Internet Explorer 9)?

Answers

  • It doesn't appear to be possible to disable it, if what we see in the Developer Preview is an indication.  Will IE10 in the upcoming beta be different?  Time will tell.

    The inability to disable subpixel rendering is probably rooted in the fact that browsers are all moving toward rendering text that can be zoomed to any level without the layout changing (think of a smooth, stepless zoom on a tablet, for example).  Subpixel rendering is required for that.  Note that IE9 and 10 will both happily do the old style pixel-aligned rendering today if they are set to IE8 mode or earlier.  Whether another, "better" form of font smoothing could be done on subpixel rendered fonts isn't clear.

    Honestly, while I think it would be awesome if they'd provide options to make users happy, I really don't anticipate Microsoft taking a step backward and giving you a way to set your system to return to old style pixel-aligned font rendering.

    Many folks get good results with Cleartype-enhanced subpixel rendering, and while personal preference certainly does play a part in this, it's possible that you might find that a higher quality monitor plus good tuning of the settings could help you see fonts much more clearly, to where you can love what you're seeing on your display again.  As one who finds subpixel-rendered fonts very crisp on my own setup, I can tell you with complete confidence that it's possible.

    -Noel


    Detailed how-to in my new eBook: Configure The Windows 7 "To Work" Options

    Wednesday, February 15, 2012 8:44 PM

All replies

  • Hi jacew,

    doesn't unselecting the box Turn on ClearType on ClearType Text Tuner help? Found nothing in IE10's Internet Options.


    Irfan


    • Edited by Irfanfare Wednesday, February 15, 2012 4:01 PM to complete
    Wednesday, February 15, 2012 3:59 PM
  • Hi Irfan,

    Thanks for your quick response.

    Unfortunately IE9 (and I assume 10) ignores any system-wide settings, so that doesn't solve the issue.

    Kind regards,

    Jason 

    Wednesday, February 15, 2012 4:09 PM
  • Hi,

    here's a very lively discussion on this forum that you may find enlightening:

    http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/windowsdeveloperpreviewgeneral/thread/68b94f30-77ed-446d-bbde-197ba64a0ce2


    Irfan

    Wednesday, February 15, 2012 4:13 PM
  • It doesn't appear to be possible to disable it, if what we see in the Developer Preview is an indication.  Will IE10 in the upcoming beta be different?  Time will tell.

    The inability to disable subpixel rendering is probably rooted in the fact that browsers are all moving toward rendering text that can be zoomed to any level without the layout changing (think of a smooth, stepless zoom on a tablet, for example).  Subpixel rendering is required for that.  Note that IE9 and 10 will both happily do the old style pixel-aligned rendering today if they are set to IE8 mode or earlier.  Whether another, "better" form of font smoothing could be done on subpixel rendered fonts isn't clear.

    Honestly, while I think it would be awesome if they'd provide options to make users happy, I really don't anticipate Microsoft taking a step backward and giving you a way to set your system to return to old style pixel-aligned font rendering.

    Many folks get good results with Cleartype-enhanced subpixel rendering, and while personal preference certainly does play a part in this, it's possible that you might find that a higher quality monitor plus good tuning of the settings could help you see fonts much more clearly, to where you can love what you're seeing on your display again.  As one who finds subpixel-rendered fonts very crisp on my own setup, I can tell you with complete confidence that it's possible.

    -Noel


    Detailed how-to in my new eBook: Configure The Windows 7 "To Work" Options

    Wednesday, February 15, 2012 8:44 PM
  • I thought making users happy was one of primary design objectives of any product... apparently not Internet Explorer.

    I'm composing this post in Firefox. I'm cured of IE.

    Saturday, February 25, 2012 11:10 PM
  • Wes68, I believe the fundamental goal must be to make profit for Microsoft. 

    As much as you'd like to think you're in the mainstream, please understand that it's likely the IE9/IE10 strategy satisfies a much larger number of general users at the expense of a few like you who either prefer not to use ClearType or have equipment that doesn't render it well.

     

    -Noel


    Detailed how-to in my new eBook: Configure The Windows 7 "To Work" Options

    Saturday, February 25, 2012 11:43 PM
  • Noel,

    I realize I'm not in the mainstream, and I never cared much about that.

    Keep in mind that I'm not requesting that the needs of minority of users be satisfied at the expense of majority. I simply would like Microsoft to include an option to turn off ClearType, no matter how ugly you think it looks like. How hard or costly could that be? I also think it would increase the number of users and customers and increase their profit - one of those lost users I happen to know about might have decided to renew an MSDN subscription, worth $2,500.

    Sunday, February 26, 2012 1:49 AM
  • Non-subpixel rendering is simply fundamentally incompatible with the future of browsing, which provides smooth, organic zooming without the layout changing. The ability to lock font rendering to pixel alignment simply doesn't make sense in that environment, as an option or not.

    I am, of course, tying pixel-locked rendering together with ClearType here.  I suspect they feel there is no other good way to do font-smoothing in the sub-pixel environment.

    As I have already said, IE9 CAN do pixel-locked rendering, with the code in it right now - when in IE8 and earlier compatibility mode.  Isn't it obvious that they've REMOVED this ability on purpose?

    How hard or costly could that be?

    That, indeed in a more general sense, is a fair question, but you have to consider that beyond difficulty and development cost they also have maintenance and support costs.  I'm sure their marketing folks are concerned with the future as well - i.e., if they make an option that makes your life better, does it chance being misused or misapplied and make 10 other peoples' lives worse?  Will those people keep buying stuff from Microsoft?

    It certainly does seem that more and more they're choosing to eliminate options and just funnel everyone through the same one-size-fits-all user interface, doesn't it? 

    I've long wondered if this is simply because so many people screw up their UI and have negative experiences with Windows as a result, costing Microsoft good customer relations and possibly even some direct support dollars (though I'll be darned if I can figure out how anyone would call Microsoft to get help on something).

    Think about how few non-technical people you've run across whose systems aren't all screwed up, to the point where they can no longer use them Now think about why.  What did they tinker with to reach that screwed-up state?

    No, my friend, I'm very sad to say that it sure seems like the way of the future is to be "dumbed down", which is where the mainstream of users are.

     

    -Noel


    Detailed how-to in my new eBook: Configure The Windows 7 "To Work" Options

    Sunday, February 26, 2012 6:34 PM
  • Sunday, February 26, 2012 7:35 PM
  • So, you think the future of browsing is all about smooth organic zooming.

    Have you actually used a good tablet?  Pick up an iPad and play with the browser some time. 

    I haven't checked whether this kind of zoom is available currently on a Windows-based tablet, but it's very clear Microsoft is wanting to emulate Apple (as well they should, the iPad is excellent), ergo they're imagining finger-pinch-gesture-controlled zooming as well.

    Do you not see that Windows 8 isn't being targeted to computers at all?  Microsoft wants to sell billions of copies of apps to tablet users from their App Store.  Apple has become a world economic power doing this.  Imagine what Microsoft believes they can do with their own App Store.

     

    -Noel


    Detailed how-to in my new eBook: Configure The Windows 7 "To Work" Options

    Sunday, February 26, 2012 8:09 PM