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re: several versions of .NET FRAMEWORK? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi, new to these forums, just wanted to ask, are all the earlier versions of the .net framework prior to the latest release needed or can they be removed to free up some drive space? ie: windows xp home edition/ SP3 / latest .net framework version availiable to me. Thx in advance, DeadBolt.....
    Tuesday, February 10, 2009 1:08 AM

Answers

  • Hi DeadBolt,

    Welcome to MSDN forums.

    The .NET Framework is an integral Windows component that supports building and running the next generation of applications and XML Web services. The .NET Framework has two main components: the common language runtime (CLR) and the .NET Framework class library. The common language runtime is the foundation of the .NET Framework. .NET Framework 3.5 uses CLR version 2.0 and so does .NET Framework 2.0 or 3.0, while .NET framework 1.1 uses v1.1.

    Referring to removal of any the earlier versions of the .NET Framework, it depends on the applications and OS that are ran on your PC.
    If you have Windows XP Home Edition SP3, the MSI-based .NET Framework 1.1 + SP1 is shipped with Windows XP Home Edition SP3 but not as truly integrated OS components. If you don't have any application based on .NET Framework 1.1, you can remove it.
    If you have some application based on .NET Framework 3.5 on your PC, you cannot remove .NET Framework 2.0, .NET Framework 3.0 and .NET Framework 3.5 because .NET Framework 2.0 and .NET Framework 3.0 are the prerequisite of .NET Framework 3.5. So the three .NET Frameworks cannot be removed.
    For more information of .NET Framework Conceptual Overview, see: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/zw4w595w.aspx
    For more information of .NET Framework 3.5, see: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/w0x726c2.aspx

    I hope this information will be helpful.

    Thanks


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help and unmark them if they provide no help.
    • Marked as answer by YiChun Chen Tuesday, February 17, 2009 1:54 AM
    Wednesday, February 11, 2009 4:47 AM