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Single Page Application - The Future? RRS feed

  • Question

  • User-1122555565 posted

    I've been developing in .NET since V1, and using MVC with various patterns over the past few years.

    However I recently started looking at Windows 8 Store Apps and was interested to see that you can develop in either XAML or Javascript.

    Now the first dilema is - which to use?  Most tutorials are for XAML, however I do like the idea of using Javascript and this would a) mean there's less learning as I can use existing skills, and b) it (I hope) will make it easier to port applications between pure web and Windows 8 apps.  The main drawback was how Windows 8 app are built in JS - in that they all seemed to use a shell and have views in that shell - very different to a 'normal' web app.

    Until I found SPAs (Single Page Applications)

    Now these seem to follow the Windows 8 JS pattern pretty much exactly.  By using libs such as Durandal, Breeze, KnockOut etc I can use proper MVVM patterns, and nicely seperate design and logic.

    However - is this just a new fad?  the idea of a SPA has been around for years, but it seems quite recently that Microsoft has started to jump on the bandwagon with some really good templates and tutorials (plus I beleive Knockout is built by MS employees in the open source comunity)

    So I'm trying to figure out if it's worth spending the time getting into this and to start using it for my web apps.  It it is going to become the defacto standard for web apps then it's a no brainer - but what it it goes the way of the Dodo?  Then I have a load of apps that no one will want to support because they are using a niche pattern.

    Anybody have any views/experience?

    If anyone from Microsoft is watching - do you know if the idea it to start pushing this as the standard?

    Wednesday, July 10, 2013 4:59 AM

Answers

  • User541108374 posted

    HI,

    By using libs such as Durandal, Breeze, KnockOut etc I can use proper MVVM patterns, and nicely seperate design and logic.

    I suggest you also take a look at Angular.js. Visual Studio 2013 will have built in support for it (templates and Intellisense) so Microsoft recognizes the importance of this framework as well. I've seen it during a session at Tech Ed Europe 2013 recently by Scott Hunter from Microsoft.

    but what it it goes the way of the Dodo?

    In the ever changing world of IT there's no such thing as a glass ball that predicts the future. Silverlight looked like the solution for all the web apps out there but seems to be as dead as can be. I still remember the days that it was said that javascript would never become that popular and would fade away in favor of Flash. Nowadays it turns out that javascript is the most used/popular language around.

    Grz, Kris.

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Wednesday, July 10, 2013 5:31 AM

All replies

  • User541108374 posted

    HI,

    By using libs such as Durandal, Breeze, KnockOut etc I can use proper MVVM patterns, and nicely seperate design and logic.

    I suggest you also take a look at Angular.js. Visual Studio 2013 will have built in support for it (templates and Intellisense) so Microsoft recognizes the importance of this framework as well. I've seen it during a session at Tech Ed Europe 2013 recently by Scott Hunter from Microsoft.

    but what it it goes the way of the Dodo?

    In the ever changing world of IT there's no such thing as a glass ball that predicts the future. Silverlight looked like the solution for all the web apps out there but seems to be as dead as can be. I still remember the days that it was said that javascript would never become that popular and would fade away in favor of Flash. Nowadays it turns out that javascript is the most used/popular language around.

    Grz, Kris.

    • Marked as answer by Anonymous Thursday, October 7, 2021 12:00 AM
    Wednesday, July 10, 2013 5:31 AM
  • User-1122555565 posted

    Thanks for that.

    I'll definitely check out Angular.js - I've seen it mentioned but there's so many libraries out there you never know which to invest the time in - especially when you're trying to architect a new app that has to be supported for 'the foreseable future'!  Such is our bain I guess!

    I hear what you're saying about the crystal ball - I was being a bit sarcastic in that remark - personally I always hated flash, and to some extent silverlight for trying to copy it (at least in what it was trying to acheive) - I never used to like javascript but as you say it is now the most popular - and given how it has matured it now seems almost naive to ever question it!  I certainly think libraries such as Jquery have certainly helped give it real power and useability.

    Cheers

    Brett

    Saturday, July 13, 2013 5:43 PM