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Is there a Bing Tile Generator service? RRS feed

  • Question

  • With google maps you have KML Layers which allow for tiles to be generated by Googles services for use in your map.

    This allows thousands of entities to be shown on the map with little performance degradation.

    Does such a thing now exist as part of Bing Maps?

    EDIT: I should also say that the entities are interactive in so much that you can click them, and get back an ID to use.

    • Edited by Andy Jump Friday, February 10, 2017 8:47 AM Added missing detail about interactivity.
    Thursday, February 9, 2017 2:21 PM

Answers

  • The Bing Maps team has code samples of how to create a custom web service to generating tile layers from data. However this is generally only really used when rendering tens of thousands or millions of shapes on a map. Most Bing Maps customers who have data sets of that size tend to want to keep their data secure and private using a database. I believe the feature you are talking about in Google Maps is through Fusion Tables which is experimental, and which exposes the data as a public facing REST service.

    The Bing Maps web API is capable of rendering a lot more data than Google Maps, so few apps actually need to use a tile layer for their data. I actually have a sample app that renders 64,000 complex and detailed polygons on the web based maps as raw vector data. If you need or want to render more data than this you can find the details on how to create a custom server side rendering solution here:

    https://1drv.ms/b/s!AgFqp4QkIjUNloYCwQmwpbyH8dRs6A

    Here is the code samples for the whitepaper: https://1drv.ms/u/s!AgFqp4QkIjUNk9xph3TWsn4k8M9kzA

    The Bing Maps V8 API doesn't currently support KML but this is a planned feature.


    [Blog] [twitter] [LinkedIn]

    • Proposed as answer by Ricky_Brundritt Thursday, February 9, 2017 6:11 PM
    • Marked as answer by Andy Jump Friday, February 10, 2017 3:47 PM
    Thursday, February 9, 2017 6:10 PM

All replies

  • The Bing Maps team has code samples of how to create a custom web service to generating tile layers from data. However this is generally only really used when rendering tens of thousands or millions of shapes on a map. Most Bing Maps customers who have data sets of that size tend to want to keep their data secure and private using a database. I believe the feature you are talking about in Google Maps is through Fusion Tables which is experimental, and which exposes the data as a public facing REST service.

    The Bing Maps web API is capable of rendering a lot more data than Google Maps, so few apps actually need to use a tile layer for their data. I actually have a sample app that renders 64,000 complex and detailed polygons on the web based maps as raw vector data. If you need or want to render more data than this you can find the details on how to create a custom server side rendering solution here:

    https://1drv.ms/b/s!AgFqp4QkIjUNloYCwQmwpbyH8dRs6A

    Here is the code samples for the whitepaper: https://1drv.ms/u/s!AgFqp4QkIjUNk9xph3TWsn4k8M9kzA

    The Bing Maps V8 API doesn't currently support KML but this is a planned feature.


    [Blog] [twitter] [LinkedIn]

    • Proposed as answer by Ricky_Brundritt Thursday, February 9, 2017 6:11 PM
    • Marked as answer by Andy Jump Friday, February 10, 2017 3:47 PM
    Thursday, February 9, 2017 6:10 PM
  • Hi, thanks for the response.

    I have used Google Fusion Tables, however I most commonly use the KMLLayer.

    https://developers.google.com/maps/documentation/javascript/examples/layer-kml

    As you can see you pass a URL to the KMLLayer so that Google can retrieve the KML file, which they then turn in to a tile layer with various types of entities.

    Not only does the KMLLayer generate the tiles on googles servers, but it also handles interaction with the layer so clicking on a "pin" (i.e. the bit of tile rendered as a pin) will give you the ID of that pin so you can show a popup or whatever.

    I supply the data in KML because that's that format the KMLLayer requires, so I doubt I'll be interested in the Bing Maps V8 KML support.

    Being able to render 64,000 complex polygons on screen at one time which can be interacted with is very interesting though, I'll have to set up a test and see if I can get similar performance, thanks for the suggestion.

    If that's not up to scratch then I guess as you say it'll have to be some real-time server-side rendering, and I'll have to come up with a geohashing technique to help with figuring out whats being clicked on. 

    Friday, February 10, 2017 8:34 AM