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  • Question

  • My inquiry is in general but to make it easy lets say it's regarding the Web Edition ($9.99/mo).

    Does it following the same usage billing as Azure storage. For example.

    I have 1x 1GB database for 1 day. Is it 9.99 (9.99 + 1mo=9.99) or is it (9.99 / 30days = 0.34)?

    What about having 2x 500MB databases for 30 days. Are they 9.99 (4.50 (rough) * 2databases = 9.99mo) or is it (9.99 * 2databases = 19.98/mo)?

    thanks for clarifying.
    Owner, Quilnet Solutions
    Friday, September 4, 2009 6:04 PM

Answers

  • Apologies.  Clicked on the wrong button and my reply got eaten by the web page.  Here goes again.

    Here is some additional info from the thread the Neil cites, plus some additional color commentary on metering for SQL Azure.  We haven't announced what our metering will be.  This is simply some of what we are hearing from customers and thus what is guiding our thinking on this. 

    Hope this is helpful.

    Patric

    The overwhelming feedback (and I do mean overwhelming J) we’ve gotten from customers is to keep this simple and predictable.  In fact, we’ve debated and abandoned many models simply on the basis that they didn’t meet this litmus test.  We’ll almost certainly offer other options in the future but both us and customers need some experience with usage patterns, workloads, etc. to know what is best in a given situation.  So, for now, simple, flexible and as economical as possible is what we’re driving toward.

     

    The only thing we have not yet announced is the unit of time that we will pro-rate over.  Here we are as likely to be governed by what I think of as one of the laws of small numbers as anything else.  For example, say we decided to charge by the “database day”.  For a Web edition database, that’s about $0.30 and it’s hard to imagine a need to slice this up more granularly than that.  Also, even for pretty extreme burst conditions, there isn’t much customer value for databases to come and go on a minute-by-minute basis. J  They tend to be more enduring.

    Likewise, customers have told us that for some of their apps, being able to spin up some DBs, use them for a few days or a week, and then spin them back down is of value for them in a like manner.  There would be potentially less value if we charged for an entire month.  One of the key things we are delivering with SQL Azure is to significantly reduce the friction associated with provisioning and using a highly available, fault-tolerant relational database.  If we charged for the whole month for each database created we would be at risk for re-introducing some of the friction back into the system.

    Friday, September 4, 2009 10:04 PM

All replies

  • There is an extensive discussion of the issue on this current thead.

    You will be charged for each database at one of the two pricings $9.99 or $99.99 a month for 1GB and 10GB respectively. On the thread, Patric McElroy of Microsoft writes:

    When you create a database (of either type) we will start the meter.  When you drop the database, we will stop the meter.  If the database exists for the entire month, you will be charged $9.99 for a Web edition database and $99.99 for an Enterprise edition. 

    This is the first mention I've seen of metered pricing i.e. pricing for less than a month. The original announcement only listed monthly pricing as opposed to the hourly pricing of other Azure services.
    • Proposed as answer by Patric McElroy Friday, September 4, 2009 9:53 PM
    Friday, September 4, 2009 6:27 PM
    Answerer
  • Apologies.  Clicked on the wrong button and my reply got eaten by the web page.  Here goes again.

    Here is some additional info from the thread the Neil cites, plus some additional color commentary on metering for SQL Azure.  We haven't announced what our metering will be.  This is simply some of what we are hearing from customers and thus what is guiding our thinking on this. 

    Hope this is helpful.

    Patric

    The overwhelming feedback (and I do mean overwhelming J) we’ve gotten from customers is to keep this simple and predictable.  In fact, we’ve debated and abandoned many models simply on the basis that they didn’t meet this litmus test.  We’ll almost certainly offer other options in the future but both us and customers need some experience with usage patterns, workloads, etc. to know what is best in a given situation.  So, for now, simple, flexible and as economical as possible is what we’re driving toward.

     

    The only thing we have not yet announced is the unit of time that we will pro-rate over.  Here we are as likely to be governed by what I think of as one of the laws of small numbers as anything else.  For example, say we decided to charge by the “database day”.  For a Web edition database, that’s about $0.30 and it’s hard to imagine a need to slice this up more granularly than that.  Also, even for pretty extreme burst conditions, there isn’t much customer value for databases to come and go on a minute-by-minute basis. J  They tend to be more enduring.

    Likewise, customers have told us that for some of their apps, being able to spin up some DBs, use them for a few days or a week, and then spin them back down is of value for them in a like manner.  There would be potentially less value if we charged for an entire month.  One of the key things we are delivering with SQL Azure is to significantly reduce the friction associated with provisioning and using a highly available, fault-tolerant relational database.  If we charged for the whole month for each database created we would be at risk for re-introducing some of the friction back into the system.

    Friday, September 4, 2009 10:04 PM
  • Patric -

    Thanks for the further clarification. I suspect you are right as regards the reality of sub-day use and pricing of SQL Azure. However, if you went back through the Azure Services forum you might be surprised at the pushback against even hourly pricing for Azure Services.
    Friday, September 4, 2009 10:23 PM
    Answerer
  • Thank you! Your reply is very helpful. I am glad that Microsoft is taking a proactive response to customer feedback and acting on the feedback it receives. It's easier (and more confortable) doing business with a company like this.

    Thanks again for your reply.
    Owner, Quilnet Solutions
    Tuesday, September 8, 2009 10:36 PM