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sharepoint 2013 quotas RRS feed

  • Question

  • we have sharepoint 2013 environment, and are looking at implementing quotas for document uploads and various site collections.

    I wanted to know firstly if there are any default quotas settings in sharepoint 2013 for documents and site collections.  Or if there are none.

    If none do we have a rule of thumb on what the quota settings can be.  Such as for medium size farm what would be a good value for quotas for document sizes and also for site collections intially.

    I am writing up a governance plan for sharepoint and for quotas section i want to add some quota criterias.  Any ideas.

    Thanks

    Tuesday, July 16, 2013 9:14 PM

Answers

  • Document upload is 250MB: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc262787.aspx

    How large you go depends on the size of the documents you need to support and the overall network architecture. It's not a one size fits all answer, you might be fine enabling 800mb files if you're going to be using lots of caching for video files but equally 400mb excel files might bring the same environment to its knees.

    By default SharePoint Site Collections do not have quotas. You can assign one to site collections on creation or afterwards but by default they are not limited. There's various approaches but again you need to target them to your situation.

    Tuesday, July 16, 2013 10:57 PM
  • As Alex mentions there are no OOB Quotas within SharePoint 2013.  An Academic link on setting them up can be found here: -

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc263223.aspx

    Some thoughts that I tend to use when looking at scalability tend to be cultural as well as technological.  Such as: -

    1. Culturally, is there an internal (re)billing mechanism?  If network drives / shared drives have an internal cost, than consider pegging the SharePoint cost onto this.  Without proper governance, others may use your deployment as a way of getting round budget constraints
    2. What are the sizes of personal drives on the network shares?  You can probably get some metrics with PowerShell depending on what version of Windows you're using.  This'll help to establish some comparable benchmarks 
    3. Not entirely related but to help prevent unchecked growth and large of the content databases, consider a deletion policy for any content after 6 months or so, or have it moved to cheaper forms or storage.

    I might also suggest a quick look over capacity limits Alex has posted in greater detail too.


    Cheers,

    Steven Andrews

    SharePoint Business Analyst

    Blog: Steve's SharePoint Space  Twitter:   LinkedIn:   Facebook:

    Note: Posts are provided “AS IS” without warranty of any kind, either expressed or implied, including but not limited to the implied warranties of merchantability and/or fitness for a particular purpose.

    Tuesday, July 16, 2013 11:16 PM
    Answerer

All replies

  • Document upload is 250MB: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc262787.aspx

    How large you go depends on the size of the documents you need to support and the overall network architecture. It's not a one size fits all answer, you might be fine enabling 800mb files if you're going to be using lots of caching for video files but equally 400mb excel files might bring the same environment to its knees.

    By default SharePoint Site Collections do not have quotas. You can assign one to site collections on creation or afterwards but by default they are not limited. There's various approaches but again you need to target them to your situation.

    Tuesday, July 16, 2013 10:57 PM
  • As Alex mentions there are no OOB Quotas within SharePoint 2013.  An Academic link on setting them up can be found here: -

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc263223.aspx

    Some thoughts that I tend to use when looking at scalability tend to be cultural as well as technological.  Such as: -

    1. Culturally, is there an internal (re)billing mechanism?  If network drives / shared drives have an internal cost, than consider pegging the SharePoint cost onto this.  Without proper governance, others may use your deployment as a way of getting round budget constraints
    2. What are the sizes of personal drives on the network shares?  You can probably get some metrics with PowerShell depending on what version of Windows you're using.  This'll help to establish some comparable benchmarks 
    3. Not entirely related but to help prevent unchecked growth and large of the content databases, consider a deletion policy for any content after 6 months or so, or have it moved to cheaper forms or storage.

    I might also suggest a quick look over capacity limits Alex has posted in greater detail too.


    Cheers,

    Steven Andrews

    SharePoint Business Analyst

    Blog: Steve's SharePoint Space  Twitter:   LinkedIn:   Facebook:

    Note: Posts are provided “AS IS” without warranty of any kind, either expressed or implied, including but not limited to the implied warranties of merchantability and/or fitness for a particular purpose.

    Tuesday, July 16, 2013 11:16 PM
    Answerer