locked
Is MSDN license suitable? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi,

    We are a small company giving technical practices training e.g. TDD to clients and community user groups. We have 5 Mac Mini machines in our office installed with VMWare and like to purchase Windows licenses for our classroom.
    Since the machines are not going to host any production apps and only purely use for software development, will MSDN license be more suitable for this purpose? How many license should I get then?

    Thank you,

    Stanly
    Monday, April 11, 2011 8:53 AM

Answers

  • Hi, 

    Since MSDN is base on per-user licensed, you cannot let other people using the MSDN Licensed Computer without they own a MSDN.

    MSDN is not a team subscription, there are a few method for this issue.

    1. Purchases MSDN License for every user

    2. Purchases MSDN License for some user, and transfer MSDN License when other user need to use the computer (not recommand)

    3. Just get a Retail / VOL License, and you can go free for any usage lol. (Best Option for you)

     

    Hope this help,

    Nova


    Nova C. Altesse





    • Proposed as answer by Nova Altesse Friday, May 6, 2011 4:16 AM
    • Marked as answer by Mike Kinsman Wednesday, May 25, 2011 8:08 PM
    Friday, May 6, 2011 3:26 AM
  • Stanly,

    You can find out more about your Volume Licensing from here: http://www.microsoft.com/licensing/Default.aspx

    Thanks,
    Mike 


    MSDN and TechNet Subscriptions Support
    Wednesday, May 25, 2011 8:08 PM

All replies

  • Stanly,

    We have some guidance posted on this under our Help tab here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/subscriptions/cc150618.aspx that states:

    MSDN subscriptions are licensed on a per-user basis.  One person can use the software to design, develop, test, or demonstrate his or her programs on any number of devices.  Each person who uses the software this way needs a license.

    For further details, please refer to the Licensing Whitepaper posted here: http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/en/details.aspx?displaylang=en&FamilyID=2b1504e6-0bf1-46da-be0e-85cc792c6b9d.  Let us know if you have any questions on it.

    Thanks,
    Mike 


    MSDN and TechNet Subscriptions Support
    Thursday, April 14, 2011 2:13 PM
  • Hi Mike,

    Thanks for replying. I think my scenario is quite special because the 5 computers will be used by different people every time due to the nature of training and community events. And we also expect pair programming to happen. How do we define user in this case? I read and searched through the whitepaper briefly and couldn't find relevant information.

    Thanks,

    Stanly

    Thursday, April 14, 2011 2:41 PM
  • Hey Stanly,

    Thanks for replying.  I agree your scenario is unusual, but I think User is defined the same as it always is, which is as any person using the software.  The top of page 16 says:

    Per-User License

    Each member of the development team that will use (install, configure, or access) the MSDN software must have his or her own MSDN subscription. Two or more individuals may use the same software if each has an MSDN subscription.

    A regular MSDN Licnese might not be the way to go for you because it will require each of your users to be a licensed MSDN Subscriber... Although, There may be a way to transfer the licenses between each of your users as they start and stop being users... which actually may work for you. 

    Let me ask a few questions internally and get back to you.  It may very well be that you're looking more for something like MSDN Academic Alliance.

    Thanks,
    Mike

     


    MSDN and TechNet Subscriptions Support
    Thursday, April 14, 2011 4:12 PM
  • Thank you Mike! Looking forward to your reply! =)

    Stanly

    Sunday, April 17, 2011 11:09 AM
  • Hi, 

    Since MSDN is base on per-user licensed, you cannot let other people using the MSDN Licensed Computer without they own a MSDN.

    MSDN is not a team subscription, there are a few method for this issue.

    1. Purchases MSDN License for every user

    2. Purchases MSDN License for some user, and transfer MSDN License when other user need to use the computer (not recommand)

    3. Just get a Retail / VOL License, and you can go free for any usage lol. (Best Option for you)

     

    Hope this help,

    Nova


    Nova C. Altesse





    • Proposed as answer by Nova Altesse Friday, May 6, 2011 4:16 AM
    • Marked as answer by Mike Kinsman Wednesday, May 25, 2011 8:08 PM
    Friday, May 6, 2011 3:26 AM
  •  I would go with volume license, Microsoft has various volume license programs for industries, yours seem to fall under education. My understanding is that Mac OS X can be used as a qualifying product for the Windows 7 Upgrade included with volume license.

    Teching It Easy: With Windows |ActiveWin | Notebooks | Microsoft MVP

    Saturday, May 7, 2011 3:18 PM
  • Hi,

    Do you mean education license such as this?

    http://www.microsoft.com/education/license/howtobuy/eligible.aspx

    Stanly

    Sunday, May 8, 2011 12:38 PM
  • Hi Nova,
    > 3. Just get a Retail / VOL License, and you can go free for any usage lol. (Best Option for you)
    If I get volume license, does it mean I'll need to purchase for future upgrades?
    Stanly
    Sunday, May 8, 2011 12:55 PM
  • Stanly.

    GO for Microsoft Software Assurance and you will able to get future upgrades last for 2 years.


    Nova C. Altesse, BBA, MCTS
    Sunday, May 8, 2011 2:00 PM
  • Is there anyway I can purchase volume license online?
    Sunday, May 15, 2011 2:34 PM
  • Stanly,

    You can find out more about your Volume Licensing from here: http://www.microsoft.com/licensing/Default.aspx

    Thanks,
    Mike 


    MSDN and TechNet Subscriptions Support
    Wednesday, May 25, 2011 8:08 PM
  • Seems to be some confusing advice here.  Probably a dead topic, but Bing ranks this highly so I will answer anyway.

    1.  As was stated, MSDN is not appropriate as it is a per-user license.  The users may be assigned every 90 days at the earliest, so if you had a class per week you would need 13 subscriptions for each machine.  This is not practical.

    2.  Additionally, MSDN use rights allow the non-production software to be used for the purposes of test, development, demonstration, or evaluation of software (the last being a brand-new right) only.  Even if you got around the per-user issue, a training scenario most likely would not be covered by the use right.

    the best bet for this scenario for commercial customers would actually be to either purchase production licenses or to leverage the training lab rights under an Enterprise Agreement.  This is a specific volume license agreement type that calls out training labs.  Educational institutions may have additional options under Campus Agreements, but I am not familiar with their terms.

    marc

    Wednesday, February 6, 2013 8:36 AM