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ActiveSync policies and "AllowConsumerEmail" vs. "AllowPOPIMAPEmail" RRS feed

  • Question

  • To whom it may concern,

    I am a software engineer working for Notify Technology Corporation, and we use Exchange ActiveSync protocol is several of our products. When comparing different security policies offered by this protocol, we have noticed that two of them("AllowConsumerEmail" vs. "AllowPOPIMAPEmail") have very similar definitions, and that the "AllowConsumerEmail" setting is simply defined in an ambiguous way. While "AllowPOPIMAPEmail" has a fairly straight-forward definition, it is not at all clear when "AllowConsumerEmail" corresponds to.

    Siting Revision 4.2 of [MS-ASPROV].pdf:

    2.2.2.1.3.1.4.1.38 AllowConsumerEmail
    The <AllowConsumerEmail> element is an optional child element of the <eas-provisioningdoc> element (section 2.2.2.1.3.1.4.1) that specifies whether the device allows the user to configure a personal e-mail account.
    The <AllowConsumerEmail> element cannot have child elements.
    Valid values for <AllowConsumerEmail> are listed in the following table.


    Siting Microsoft technet at http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb123756.aspx:

    The AllowConsumerEmail parameter specifies whether the mobile phone user can configure a personal e-mail account on the mobile phone. The default value is $true . This parameter doesn't control access to e-mails using third-party mobile phone e-mail programs.

    Considering IMAP and POP are standard protocols, these email accounts may just as easily be defined as "consumer" email as any other account type. Is this a blanket term for any email account that isn't IMAP, POP, or ActiveSync(Such as AOL/Yahoo/GMail)? If so, what would be a good example?

    Thanks in advance,

    Jedediah Ecker

    Tuesday, January 11, 2011 1:37 PM

Answers

  • Jed,

    The AllowConsumerEmail specifically blocks Windows Live services. AllowPOPIMAPEmail is specific to those two protocols (POP and IMAP).

    I hope this assists you.

    Dominic Salemno
    Escalation Engineer
    Open Specifications

    • Proposed as answer by King Salemno Thursday, January 13, 2011 6:53 PM
    • Marked as answer by Jed Ecker Thursday, January 13, 2011 7:00 PM
    Thursday, January 13, 2011 6:50 PM

All replies

  • Hi Jed Ecker, thank you for your question. A member of the protocol documentation team will respond to you soon.
    Josh Curry (jcurry) | Escalation Engineer | US-CSS DSC Protocols Team
    Tuesday, January 11, 2011 3:36 PM
    Moderator
  • Hi Jed,

    I am the engineer who has taken ownership of your issue. I am currently investigating this matter and will update you as things progress.

    Dominic Salemno
    Escalation Engineer
    Open Specifications

    Wednesday, January 12, 2011 6:32 PM
  • Jed,

    The AllowConsumerEmail specifically blocks Windows Live services. AllowPOPIMAPEmail is specific to those two protocols (POP and IMAP).

    I hope this assists you.

    Dominic Salemno
    Escalation Engineer
    Open Specifications

    • Proposed as answer by King Salemno Thursday, January 13, 2011 6:53 PM
    • Marked as answer by Jed Ecker Thursday, January 13, 2011 7:00 PM
    Thursday, January 13, 2011 6:50 PM
  • Yes it does, thank you for your time, and for your quick answer.
    Thursday, January 13, 2011 7:01 PM