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Reverting to Windows 7 from Windows.old

    General discussion

  • Reverting can be done from upgrades of older OS's. What are the steps to do this for those of us who ran the iso from a virtual drive and were never given the option to install cleanly on a partition. The download page for the iso is very misleading, making one think all the options are available if you run the update from within Windows. Many of us need out Windows 7 machines back, and were trying to simply install Win 8 on a separate partition. I found this omission unacceptable!!! Please get back to me ASAP

    Here is the link for recovering Windows.old, which means this can be done with some tweaking for what I think is an unacceptable omission by Microsoft.

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/971760

    Friday, September 16, 2011 1:07 AM

All replies

  • Hi,

    You had to install Windows 8 by restarting your system first, in that way you could see "Custom" panel available.
    I think there is not way to came back to Windows 7 and keep in mind this is a Pre-Beta version, many features are not available yet.

    Friday, September 16, 2011 1:19 AM
  • From the download page:

    The software is provided as is, and you bear the risk of using it. It may not be stable, operate correctly or work the way the final version of the software will. It should not be used in a production environment.

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/apps/br229516.aspx

    There's not much misleading about that.

     

     

    The download page doesn't mention anything about a virtual drive. "The Windows Developer Preview is delivered as an .iso image that must be converted into installation media stored on a DVD or a USB flash drive."

     

     

     

     

    Reverting Back

    First you should backup any important personal files to an external drive. You can cut/copy and paste your personal files from the Windows.old folder to an external drive, or use this method:

    How to restore your personal files after you perform a custom installation of Windows Vista or of Windows 7:
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/932912
     

    Then attempt reverting with the Windows .old folder.
    If the computer has the Windows.old folder - Reverting Windows 7 back to a previous Windows system:
    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx/kb/971760






    If that doesn't work then you need to reinstall Windows 7.

    If you bought retail Windows 7 - Installing And Reinstalling Windows 7:
    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows7/Installing-and-reinstalling-Windows-7

     

    Reinstall Windows Preinstalled On Computer

    OEM computer manufacturers are required to provide at least one way for you to reinstall Windows if you buy a computer with Windows preinstalled - your computer should have included either a restore partition on your hard drive, or Windows install/restore disks. Most computer manufacturers also have a feature to make your own install disks.

    If the restore partition is still there and was not removed, it will reinstall Windows 7. There is usually a prompt when you first start the computer telling you what key to press to start the restore - check your manual if you're not sure how to. If you have install disks - insert them, restart and boot from them to start the reinstall process. Reinstalling will remove any personal files on the computer, back them up first.


    If you don't have the restore partition or install disks:

    Contact the OEM computer manufacturer and ask them to send you an install disk for your computer - they may or may not do it. If they agree to send you one they may charge a small fee.


    Friday, September 16, 2011 1:24 AM
  • From the download page:

    The software is provided as is, and you bear the risk of using it. It may not be stable, operate correctly or work the way the final version of the software will. It should not be used in a production environment.

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/apps/br229516.aspx

    There's not much misleading about that.

     

     

    The download page doesn't mention anything about a virtual drive. "The Windows Developer Preview is delivered as an .iso image that must be converted into installation media stored on a DVD or a USB flash drive."

     


    @TrekDozer- I disagree, plenty misleading...also from the download page "A clean install is supported on all builds. You will only receive the full set of installation options when setup is launched in Windows."

     

    Although it states it must be converted to installation media, it doesn't specifically state anything about using a virtual DVD drive with an iso. A point that should have been highlighted, so yes misleading. Something most people with technical knowledge in this day and age will do is run an iso from an virtual, esp when told "You will only receive the full set of installation options when setup is launched in Windows".

    Yes, I have everything backed up, that's not my worry...it's having to rebuild my laptop and reinstall everything, and the 12 hours that entails that I'm not interested in.

    Friday, September 16, 2011 2:43 PM
  • On Fri, 16 Sep 2011 14:43:14 +0000, dkb1898 wrote:

    Yes, I have everything backed up, that's not my worry...it's having to rebuild my laptop and reinstall everything, and the 12 hours that entails that I'm not interested in.

    If you have "everything backed up" then I don't understand why you need to
    reinstall everything and that it is going to take you 12 hours to do so?
    Windows Backup in Windows 7 provides the ability to perform a backup from
    which you can do a bare metal restore of your entire system. The OS, your
    installed apps, your documents, and your current config.

    I'm sorry, but anyone who chooses to voluntarily install a new operating
    system without a complete and thorough backup of their entire system in
    this day and age, regardless of any wording on Microsoft's web site,
    especially an OS that isn't even at beta quality yet, has no one to blame
    but themselves if things go pear shaped.


    Paul Adare
    MVP - Identity Lifecycle Manager
    http://www.identit.ca
    A computer program does what you tell it to do, not what you want it to do.

    Friday, September 16, 2011 2:59 PM
  •  

    I'm sorry, but anyone who chooses to voluntarily install a new operating
    system without a complete and thorough backup of their entire system in
    this day and age, regardless of any wording on Microsoft's web site,
    especially an OS that isn't even at beta quality yet, has no one to blame
    but themselves if things go pear shaped.


    Paul Adare
    MVP - Identity Lifecycle Manager
    http://www.identit.ca
    A computer program does what you tell it to do, not what you want it to do.


    I just have my files backed up, I don't do the full backups for a variety of reasons, don't need to because Windows 7 is a rock.

    In this day and age, you can run multiple versions on a single computer through boot. That's what I was prepared to accomplish, the fact that the option never revealed itself is disturbing and misleading. Microsoft really dropped the ball with this and it's not acceptable.

    Friday, September 16, 2011 5:30 PM
  • On Fri, 16 Sep 2011 17:30:11 +0000, dkb1898 wrote:

    I just have my files backed up, I don't do the full backups for a variety of reasons, don't need to because Windows 7 is a rock.

    Windows 7 maybe a rock, however, you were installing a pre-beta operating
    system
    . That has all kinds of possible downsides, all of which could have
    been rectified with a simple system image backup prior to the install.


    In this day and age, you can run multiple versions on a single computer through boot. That's what I was prepared to accomplish, the fact that the option never revealed itself is disturbing and misleading. Microsoft really dropped the ball with this and it's not acceptable.

    FWIW, this is exactly the same way that the Windows 7 installer works. If
    you run setup from within Windows, your OS gets upgraded. If you boot from
    install media, you get a choice.


    Paul Adare
    MVP - Identity Lifecycle Manager
    http://www.identit.ca
    An elephant is a mouse with an operating system.

    Friday, September 16, 2011 6:20 PM
  •  

    FWIW, this is exactly the same way that the Windows 7 installer works. If
    you run setup from within Windows, your OS gets upgraded. If you boot from
    install media, you get a choice.


    Paul Adare
    MVP - Identity Lifecycle Manager
    http://www.identit.ca
    An elephant is a mouse with an operating system.

    The install for Windows 7 does NOT work just like that. I've installed it a maybe 5-6 times since the beta, it gives you the option to install on a partition. In fact I did this with the Windows 7 Beta, then RC!!! And I think I even did that from a virtual disk as well because it seems silly to me to create for environmental waste. So I had a lot of trust in the teams that work for Steve Sinofsky. I understand I bear some responsibility here, and luckily I'm a technical guy with hardware, etc.., not just a software engineer. They need to fix that download page ASAP, its just currently unacceptable, and many more will be in much worse shape than I am.

    Needless to say that now instead of playing around with development in Windows 8, I have to hack around to see if I can trick the system with Windows.old, or do a complete reinstall of the OS, my apps, and all my settings!

    Friday, September 16, 2011 9:16 PM