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20.1.4.1.24 - majorFont, does a:font take precedent over a:latin/ea/cs? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi all;

    It seems logical that it would (why else be there). But it does not say when to use the a:font element and when to use the latin/ea/cs in the spec. Is there a rule for when to use the a:font element?

    And which do I use if I have ascii text with the locale set to Japan? Do I then use the latin or the script='Jpan'?

    thanks - dave


    Who will win The Windward International Collegiate Programming Championships?


    • Edited by DavidThi808 Thursday, March 7, 2013 12:36 AM
    Thursday, March 7, 2013 12:34 AM

Answers

  • Hi Dave,

    The primer in ISO/IEC 29500-1:

    L.4.3.2.5  Major and Minor Font (Font Collection)

    The complex type CT_FontCollectiondefines a major and minor font which is used in the font scheme.

    A font collection consists of a font definition for Latin, East Asian, and complex script. On top of these

    three definitions, one can also define a font for use in a specific language or languages.

    does hint to the intuitive logic that a:font would be the more specific qualification and therefore used first.  I did verify that Office follows this common sense reading of the standard in general cases.  If a typeface is specified with an a:font element in the theme font collection (major or minor, depending on which is being applied) for the script tag corresponding to the language, it will use it.  If not, it will fall back to the latin, ea or cs settings for the bytes and install language or locale settings as we’ve discussed in other posts.  However, it should be noted that majorFont and minorFont are merely collections of font information.  They defer to the elements that use them and the implementation of those elements.  For example, 17.15.1.88 themeFontLang describes how to index into those.  It’s not guaranteed that every referring element will be specified to use them in the same way. 

    Best regards,
    Tom Jebo
    Escalation Engineer
    Microsoft Open Specifications

    Monday, April 15, 2013 11:27 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Hi Dave,

    Thanks for the question on a:font and latin/ea/cs, I will look into this for you. 

    Best regards,
    Tom Jebo
    Escalation Engineer
    Microsoft Open Specifications

    Thursday, March 7, 2013 6:46 AM
    Moderator
  • Hi Dave,

    The primer in ISO/IEC 29500-1:

    L.4.3.2.5  Major and Minor Font (Font Collection)

    The complex type CT_FontCollectiondefines a major and minor font which is used in the font scheme.

    A font collection consists of a font definition for Latin, East Asian, and complex script. On top of these

    three definitions, one can also define a font for use in a specific language or languages.

    does hint to the intuitive logic that a:font would be the more specific qualification and therefore used first.  I did verify that Office follows this common sense reading of the standard in general cases.  If a typeface is specified with an a:font element in the theme font collection (major or minor, depending on which is being applied) for the script tag corresponding to the language, it will use it.  If not, it will fall back to the latin, ea or cs settings for the bytes and install language or locale settings as we’ve discussed in other posts.  However, it should be noted that majorFont and minorFont are merely collections of font information.  They defer to the elements that use them and the implementation of those elements.  For example, 17.15.1.88 themeFontLang describes how to index into those.  It’s not guaranteed that every referring element will be specified to use them in the same way. 

    Best regards,
    Tom Jebo
    Escalation Engineer
    Microsoft Open Specifications

    Monday, April 15, 2013 11:27 PM
    Moderator
  • I love it when the answer is "it depends." Ok, we've found the same thing you found so we'll go with that and hope that Word rarely deviates from it.

    thanks - dave


    Who will win The Windward International Collegiate Programming Championships?

    Tuesday, April 16, 2013 1:01 PM