none
The future of SB

    Question

  • I am new to programming myself, but have used SB in the past and was wondering why I should learn a dead language? I hate to be blunt, but that's just what Small BASIC seems to be, a good idea in itself, but without updates to fix bugs (I don't personally know of any when it comes to SB but there is always bugs.) or add new features, it seems that this language is frozen in time.

    Now I acknowledge the SB community is definitely alive and well, and that a lot of you love this language & manage to add to the functionality of SB, but why has Microsoft seemed to have dropped the ball on this gem of a language? I would love to see a version 2 where the tutorial is in the IDE like it was in version .9 instead of having to peruse through the PDF, that's counter-intuitive!

    Can one of you guys explain to me why you keep adding to this language when it already seems dead in the water?

    Sunday, March 30, 2014 6:20 AM

Answers

    1. Because it has an active community that believe in it. 
    2. MS and many of its employees also believe in it.
    3. Because it is a good idea - so I have confidence it will not die.
    4. It is a learning language and even if not developed further has value exactly as it is - as a bridge to many other languages and programing computers in general; which it is important that the next generation have some understanding of and can appreciate the creative fun to be had.

    It is true that MS has not developed further 'dropped the ball' since the creator of SB left MS, but MS is currently in the process ofpicking it up again - recent communications suggest that there will be updates, bug fixes etc.

    Sunday, March 30, 2014 8:38 PM
    Moderator
  • Hi Chris

    Thanks for asking this. I think it's important to continually consider the value/usefullness and future of anything that one uses.

    I don't develop extensions but with a bit of a stretch i suppose i add to the languages ecosystem by using SB and participating with it's related resources, like this forum.

    The reason i use SB is because i want to become a software developer and hopefully a successful one. So i continually evaluate how effective SB is in being a means to this end. So far for me it has been an excellent language choice, i just keep learning and speculate that this will only grow.

    SB's simplied ide and small library is the best feature for learning. It allows me to concentrate on a few powerful classes without having to sift through 100's of ide features. This gives me a chance to concentrate on core programming techniques right at the outset and forces me to learn how to create and manage my own methods of doing things.

    Using SB has given me a solid grounding and has allowed and forced me to explore more advanced stuff before i go on to learn more languages.

    The fact that the community is alive and well, the wiki's growing and people continue to develop extensions is probably a good indicator why SB is a good choice for learning. Also i speculate that .NET has a great future (probably more cross platform support coming) and a growing store. Products have life-cycles and i think MS is in a good place. Testimonials are another thing worth looking at. There's a lot and they're all good.

    So after 14 months of learning with SB and it's abundant learning resources, I'm stoked! I still use it and suspect i will for sometime to come.

    Eventually (5 year plan here) i aim to develop useful and entertaining applets and apps and post them on the stores and my own website, generate interest and hopefully recoup any modest outlays. I figure that getting off to a solid start will set me up well and reduce the incidence of creating my own techincal debt.

    I reckon, get a solid start. I researched what i was embarking on and i'm glad i chose SB. This article dicusses what i found out: http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/18192.development-map-for-becoming-a-good-programmer-using-small-basic-and-msdn/revision/14.aspx

    It seems obvious to me that the SB project is supported and valuable. I wouldn't be surprised if an upgrade was on the horizon. I have no bug or platform issues.

    I think the SB environment is a top candiate for those learning to program.

    I've learnt lots. Programming is a fantastic craft. I'm more enthusiastic then ever and i can only attribute this to SB, its community and the support, encouragement and broad experience that its members bring.

    I can't wait to post an app on the store (but i will 'cause i've got more i want to learn yet).

    That's why i continue to use SB. It's fun and the best learning environment i could find to become a .NET dev.

    Sunday, March 30, 2014 9:38 PM
    Moderator
  • The best things about SB are it's simplicity and it's use of graphics, which mean that you can start creating engaging programs really quickly. It's a great way to learn programming.

    Once you've worked your way through the tutorial, you will have encountered nearly all aspects of the language and you will have a good basic knowledge of programming.

    Then you have two choices: carry on with SB, learn about the extensions and write ever more interesting programs, or move on to another language.

    If you want to become a professional programmer and/or want to advance you knowledge of programming, take the second choice (see the thread about Additional Resources for some guidance). If you are happy being a hobbyist programmer then you can stick with SB and have fun.

    Monday, March 31, 2014 6:32 AM

All replies

    1. Because it has an active community that believe in it. 
    2. MS and many of its employees also believe in it.
    3. Because it is a good idea - so I have confidence it will not die.
    4. It is a learning language and even if not developed further has value exactly as it is - as a bridge to many other languages and programing computers in general; which it is important that the next generation have some understanding of and can appreciate the creative fun to be had.

    It is true that MS has not developed further 'dropped the ball' since the creator of SB left MS, but MS is currently in the process ofpicking it up again - recent communications suggest that there will be updates, bug fixes etc.

    Sunday, March 30, 2014 8:38 PM
    Moderator
  • Hi Chris

    Thanks for asking this. I think it's important to continually consider the value/usefullness and future of anything that one uses.

    I don't develop extensions but with a bit of a stretch i suppose i add to the languages ecosystem by using SB and participating with it's related resources, like this forum.

    The reason i use SB is because i want to become a software developer and hopefully a successful one. So i continually evaluate how effective SB is in being a means to this end. So far for me it has been an excellent language choice, i just keep learning and speculate that this will only grow.

    SB's simplied ide and small library is the best feature for learning. It allows me to concentrate on a few powerful classes without having to sift through 100's of ide features. This gives me a chance to concentrate on core programming techniques right at the outset and forces me to learn how to create and manage my own methods of doing things.

    Using SB has given me a solid grounding and has allowed and forced me to explore more advanced stuff before i go on to learn more languages.

    The fact that the community is alive and well, the wiki's growing and people continue to develop extensions is probably a good indicator why SB is a good choice for learning. Also i speculate that .NET has a great future (probably more cross platform support coming) and a growing store. Products have life-cycles and i think MS is in a good place. Testimonials are another thing worth looking at. There's a lot and they're all good.

    So after 14 months of learning with SB and it's abundant learning resources, I'm stoked! I still use it and suspect i will for sometime to come.

    Eventually (5 year plan here) i aim to develop useful and entertaining applets and apps and post them on the stores and my own website, generate interest and hopefully recoup any modest outlays. I figure that getting off to a solid start will set me up well and reduce the incidence of creating my own techincal debt.

    I reckon, get a solid start. I researched what i was embarking on and i'm glad i chose SB. This article dicusses what i found out: http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/18192.development-map-for-becoming-a-good-programmer-using-small-basic-and-msdn/revision/14.aspx

    It seems obvious to me that the SB project is supported and valuable. I wouldn't be surprised if an upgrade was on the horizon. I have no bug or platform issues.

    I think the SB environment is a top candiate for those learning to program.

    I've learnt lots. Programming is a fantastic craft. I'm more enthusiastic then ever and i can only attribute this to SB, its community and the support, encouragement and broad experience that its members bring.

    I can't wait to post an app on the store (but i will 'cause i've got more i want to learn yet).

    That's why i continue to use SB. It's fun and the best learning environment i could find to become a .NET dev.

    Sunday, March 30, 2014 9:38 PM
    Moderator
  • Wow thanks for the replies guys, the smallness of the language is definitely a plus for someone like me looking to understand the fundamentals of programming, you two have convinced me to become an SB enthusiast as well, I just hope there will be a version update soon with more cool features!
    Sunday, March 30, 2014 10:27 PM
  • I will study the introduction until I get a decent understanding then will go onto harder topics, but will come back for help when I really can't find an answer to my problem.

    Sunday, March 30, 2014 11:23 PM
  • The best things about SB are it's simplicity and it's use of graphics, which mean that you can start creating engaging programs really quickly. It's a great way to learn programming.

    Once you've worked your way through the tutorial, you will have encountered nearly all aspects of the language and you will have a good basic knowledge of programming.

    Then you have two choices: carry on with SB, learn about the extensions and write ever more interesting programs, or move on to another language.

    If you want to become a professional programmer and/or want to advance you knowledge of programming, take the second choice (see the thread about Additional Resources for some guidance). If you are happy being a hobbyist programmer then you can stick with SB and have fun.

    Monday, March 31, 2014 6:32 AM
  • Great answer outbyone!

    The curriculum is a fantastic learning resource, you can find a link to it here: http://smallbasic.com/

    Looking back I learnt the SB language (primarily using the curriculum) and while learning the language I LEARNT TO PROGRAM.

    Some good points on differentiating between learning a language and learning to program were raised on this thread: http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/8275f90d-a32a-4e08-9795-2d0693d2f24e/how-long-should-i-use-small-basic-as-a-learning-language?forum=smallbasic

    The opportunities available to programmers are huge and I think only limited by ones own passion and imagination.

    Here's a nice video on programming: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OWsyrnOBsJs

    Here's a nice one on effective delivery of learning resources: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gM95HHI4gLk

    I think SB and its virtual resources are a great mix. Up to date and a top candidate for continual improvement. IT's part of the future. I have undoubtedly learnt and benefited from its existence and delivery.

    Saturday, April 12, 2014 9:00 PM
    Moderator
  • small is beautiful

    Sunday, April 13, 2014 8:07 AM
  • It's hard to think of something as dead when the community is so alive and extensions are added to it and updated all the time.

     

    Plus, as LitDev said, we are working on it. We can't confirm a release though, until after the release. =^)


    Ed Price, Power BI & SQL Server Customer Program Manager (Blog, Small Basic, Wiki Ninjas, Wiki)

    Answer an interesting question? Create a wiki article about it!

    Tuesday, April 29, 2014 12:34 AM
    Owner
  • Jibba Jabba also mentioned the testimonials. Here are the ones we collected for kids age 8-13:

    http://blogs.msdn.com/b/smallbasic/archive/2012/10/25/small-basic-elementary-student-testimonials.aspx


    Ed Price, Power BI & SQL Server Customer Program Manager (Blog, Small Basic, Wiki Ninjas, Wiki)

    Answer an interesting question? Create a wiki article about it!

    Tuesday, April 29, 2014 12:56 AM
    Owner
  • This is a great topic! See this blog post: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/smallbasic/archive/2014/04/28/why-do-you-continue-to-use-small-basic-an-epic-answer.aspx

    Ed Price, Power BI & SQL Server Customer Program Manager (Blog, Small Basic, Wiki Ninjas, Wiki)

    Answer an interesting question? Create a wiki article about it!

    Tuesday, April 29, 2014 9:48 PM
    Owner