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Visual Studio 2005 Standard vs Professional RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi,

    I am trying to decide between the Standard and Professional versions of visual studio. The only information I can find on the Microsoft web site with a product comparison is ...

    http://lab.msdn.microsoft.com/vs2005/productinfo/productline/default.aspx


    this lists several differences which may/may not be of concern to me. Does anybody know where I could find more information on....

    1. The difference between the 'streamlined' and 'full' user experience (I assume this means IDE)

    2. What is extensibility available in the professional edition above the 'consume extensions' of the standard edition?

    3. Does 'remote' debugging refer to debugging code from a different 'solution' on the same or a different PC, or something alltogether different?

    Also are solutions developed in one version fully compatible with the other?

    Thanks in advance,

    DJ
    Thursday, September 22, 2005 10:53 AM

Answers

  • Dirk,

    The linked website in the original post is the official word on what's going to be in each SKU.

    If you have questions about specific features, I'll be glad to let you know which SKU has what.  Meantime, here's the answers to your questions above:

    * In answer to your question about the Extensibility features, the STD SKU can consume 3rd party add-ins, but it cannot be used to create them.  Unless you're an ISV looking to create an add-in for other developers, this shouldn't limit you.

    * Remote debugging refers to cross-machine debugging.

    * Solutions are completely compatible between the Standard and Pro SKUs.

    * The "streamlined user experience" means that the UI has been preset with simplified development in mind.

    Thanks!
    Robert McIntyre
    Visual Studio Product Team
    Tuesday, September 27, 2005 6:23 PM
    Moderator
  • ChasP:
    I have been using vb Express 2005 now for a few weeks, and it has been working great for me.  As far as I can tell, I can get by without the "Pro" features.

    The "streamlined" interface looks to me like its missing a few of the more "advanced" menus like fewer options in debugging windows, context menu on the code line numbers, etc.  But so far, I've been able to build anything I've found missing into a custom menu using the Customize feature.

    Consume extensions vs. full means you cannot create add-ins but you can use them.

    Click once is a simplified deployment architechture instead of building full-featured MSI based installations (which I would recommend Advanced Installer for anyway.  There is a freeware version that does the job splendidly for my company)

    Server explorer is for using a "sql server enterprise manager"-like interface inside the IDE.  If you use sql server, and have enterprise manager, then it is much a matter of convenience to keep it all inside the ide instead of switching.  Some people, however, I believe use it to do static data object stuff such as dataset definitions, but I've found creating everything in memory to be a much more flexible way to go anyway--for me anyway.  Bottom line--with the server explorer pane, you can do the database stuff with the SQL server Express version (and I believe MSDE) but not full blown SQL Server.

    SQL Server integration... I personally have not encountered this (for the same reason as above).  I believe any integration can be achieved in code and it is simply a waste of money in my situation.  Of course, I started thinking this way when I was 16 and got VB 4 standard.  Couldn't do the data stuff through the IDE so I just learned how to code it all through DAO instead.

    I would download the Express version for free from microsoft and see if it does what you like!  Remember, only you can decide what you'll need to get the job done--don't let other people intimidate you by saying if you're a pro you use pro.  It's bunk.

    Hope this helps!

    Monday, December 12, 2005 12:32 AM

All replies

  • In general, Professional allows you to develop Enterprise quality applications.  If you intend to use SQL Server, connect across corporate networks, generate Crystal Reports, etc., you should get the Professional.  Otherwise, you're probably OK with the standard.  Try out the betas for each if you have access, you most likely won't notice a big difference.  Also, if you're writing any server based programs, stick with Professional.

    Remote debugging allows you to debug an application running on a remote machine or server.

    Hope this helps,
    Josh Lindenmuth
    Thursday, September 22, 2005 1:37 PM
    Moderator
  • Josh,

    Thanks for the help.

    This gives a good general overview of the differences. Are you aware of any documentation anywhere that details what is missing from the standard edition versus the professional?

    Dirk
    Friday, September 23, 2005 1:45 AM
  • Dirk,

    The linked website in the original post is the official word on what's going to be in each SKU.

    If you have questions about specific features, I'll be glad to let you know which SKU has what.  Meantime, here's the answers to your questions above:

    * In answer to your question about the Extensibility features, the STD SKU can consume 3rd party add-ins, but it cannot be used to create them.  Unless you're an ISV looking to create an add-in for other developers, this shouldn't limit you.

    * Remote debugging refers to cross-machine debugging.

    * Solutions are completely compatible between the Standard and Pro SKUs.

    * The "streamlined user experience" means that the UI has been preset with simplified development in mind.

    Thanks!
    Robert McIntyre
    Visual Studio Product Team
    Tuesday, September 27, 2005 6:23 PM
    Moderator
  • Robert - speaking of versions, do you happen to know which version will be given to attendees at the Visual Studio 2005 / SQL Server launches in October/November?

    Thanks,
    Josh
    Tuesday, September 27, 2005 8:02 PM
    Moderator
  • I don't believe that information is available yet.

    Thanks!
    Robert McIntyre
    Microsoft Visual Studio Product Team
    Tuesday, September 27, 2005 8:08 PM
    Moderator
  • Robert,

    Thanks for the info this helps a lot.

    Some more detail on the "streamlined user experience" would be good:

    1. When you say "preset", I assume this means defined for that SKU, or can the UI be configured by the user?

    2. Can you give examples of some of the major differences with the UI between the SKU's and how the STD SKU may restrict the developer's use of funtionality in Visual Basic?

    Thanks in advance,
    Dirk.
    Thursday, September 29, 2005 6:53 AM
  • Thanks Dirk...

    1.  The UI will be configurable by the user; it will just have a set of defaults that we feel are most useful/efficient for the target customer for the Standard SKU.  All functionality that is included with the Standard SKU will be accessible.

    2.  Some of the differences between the Standard and Professional SKUs include a simplified Database Explorer in the Standard SKU, no Server Explorer in the Standard SKU, and a limited XML editing/debugging story (no specific XSLT/XSD editor, for example).

    The languages themselves remain fairly consistent between SKUs.

    Hope this helps,
    Robert McIntyre
    Visual Studio Product Team
    Friday, September 30, 2005 11:09 PM
    Moderator
  • does lack of remote debugging in the standard edition affect mobile device devlopment at all? (IE can you still debug applications on the device with standard?)

    in fact is there any difference between standard and pro that affects mobile device development?
    Wednesday, October 5, 2005 7:13 PM
  • I have several questions:

    1) Does Standard support multi project web solutions (say a web site and several class library projects in the same solution) like pro.

    2) Will Standard support Winfx tools (such as the Workflow Foundation VS 2005 extensions) when they ship?

    3) Does Standard supporting only 'click once' imply that no installer projects are available?

    Thanx,

    Lynn Eriksen
    Sunday, October 16, 2005 7:43 AM
  • No offense intended, but I think it should be noted that Professional is not required to do these things (except remote debugging).  I've been developing multi-user, SQL Server, data collision aware, 3-tier solutions for almost 3 years using VB.net Standard v. 2002 and 2003, including class libraries and visual inheritance.  In fact, I've been written up on About.com for stretching Standard far into territory normally considered Pro-only.

    A lot of it is how automated you want things to be.  I've always had to get the most out of the entry-level product due to an almost non-existent budget for dev. software, so Standard has always been my avenue.  You learn a lot of tricks through the restriction.

    But I'd rather have Pro ^^  I'm asking for it this time.
    Tuesday, November 15, 2005 7:11 PM
  • The Microsoft documentation gives some great keywords, but I am curious if someone call tell me more...

    What does streamlined user experience vs. full mean?
    What does consume extensions vs. full mean under extensibility?
    What does click once vs. yes mean for deployment tools?
    What is the server explorer mode?
    What does SQL server integration mean?

    Thanks... as a starting developer the price difference is enough to make me want more detail before choosing.

    Also, I have not found a retailer that has VS2005 available yet... any suggestions?

    Friday, December 9, 2005 2:10 PM
  •  Josh Lindenmuth wrote:
    In general, Professional allows you to develop Enterprise quality applications.


    <humor>
    I doubt any edition will allow a person to right quality applications... that is coder dependant.
    </humor>
    Sunday, December 11, 2005 12:22 AM
  • ChasP:
    I have been using vb Express 2005 now for a few weeks, and it has been working great for me.  As far as I can tell, I can get by without the "Pro" features.

    The "streamlined" interface looks to me like its missing a few of the more "advanced" menus like fewer options in debugging windows, context menu on the code line numbers, etc.  But so far, I've been able to build anything I've found missing into a custom menu using the Customize feature.

    Consume extensions vs. full means you cannot create add-ins but you can use them.

    Click once is a simplified deployment architechture instead of building full-featured MSI based installations (which I would recommend Advanced Installer for anyway.  There is a freeware version that does the job splendidly for my company)

    Server explorer is for using a "sql server enterprise manager"-like interface inside the IDE.  If you use sql server, and have enterprise manager, then it is much a matter of convenience to keep it all inside the ide instead of switching.  Some people, however, I believe use it to do static data object stuff such as dataset definitions, but I've found creating everything in memory to be a much more flexible way to go anyway--for me anyway.  Bottom line--with the server explorer pane, you can do the database stuff with the SQL server Express version (and I believe MSDE) but not full blown SQL Server.

    SQL Server integration... I personally have not encountered this (for the same reason as above).  I believe any integration can be achieved in code and it is simply a waste of money in my situation.  Of course, I started thinking this way when I was 16 and got VB 4 standard.  Couldn't do the data stuff through the IDE so I just learned how to code it all through DAO instead.

    I would download the Express version for free from microsoft and see if it does what you like!  Remember, only you can decide what you'll need to get the job done--don't let other people intimidate you by saying if you're a pro you use pro.  It's bunk.

    Hope this helps!

    Monday, December 12, 2005 12:32 AM
  •  Elijah wrote:
    ChasP:
    I have been using vb Express 2005 now for a few weeks, and it has been working great for me.  As far as I can tell, I can get by without the "Pro" features.

    The "streamlined" interface looks to me like its missing a few of the more "advanced" menus like fewer options in debugging windows, context menu on the code line numbers, etc.  But so far, I've been able to build anything I've found missing into a custom menu using the Customize feature.

    Consume extensions vs. full means you cannot create add-ins but you can use them.

    Click once is a simplified deployment architechture instead of building full-featured MSI based installations (which I would recommend Advanced Installer for anyway.  There is a freeware version that does the job splendidly for my company)

    Server explorer is for using a "sql server enterprise manager"-like interface inside the IDE.  If you use sql server, and have enterprise manager, then it is much a matter of convenience to keep it all inside the ide instead of switching.  Some people, however, I believe use it to do static data object stuff such as dataset definitions, but I've found creating everything in memory to be a much more flexible way to go anyway--for me anyway.  Bottom line--with the server explorer pane, you can do the database stuff with the SQL server Express version (and I believe MSDE) but not full blown SQL Server.

    SQL Server integration... I personally have not encountered this (for the same reason as above).  I believe any integration can be achieved in code and it is simply a waste of money in my situation.  Of course, I started thinking this way when I was 16 and got VB 4 standard.  Couldn't do the data stuff through the IDE so I just learned how to code it all through DAO instead.

    I would download the Express version for free from microsoft and see if it does what you like!  Remember, only you can decide what you'll need to get the job done--don't let other people intimidate you by saying if you're a pro you use pro.  It's bunk.

    Hope this helps!



    Thanks... I will most likely get the standard edition. I mostly write C# web applications using SQL server and prefer to do that work right on the SQL server. My windows applications are all for smaller companies and they use access and have single user applications.
    Monday, December 12, 2005 3:20 AM
  • Hi Robert,

    What about C++ in Std Edition? Does it have MFC/ATL and is dialog editor aware of MFC/ATL available for Std Edition?

    Thanks.
    Monday, December 12, 2005 2:57 PM