locked
Remnants of UAC Are On Even When Disabled

    Question

  • Experimenting, I turned UAC all the way down, but I still get prompts sometimes from Explorer and CMD windows that they don't have Administrators level privilege.  Apparently dragging UAC to the bottom doesn't accomplish quite what it once did - disabling it entirely.  Parts of it are still on, apparently.

     

    The Compatibility tab doesn't provide the opportunity to elevate privileges (the box is grayed-out), though for CMD manually choosing "Run as Administrator" overcomes the issue.

     

    Note that I am using a local account that I set up after the initial Live-connected install. In other words, I'm not the initial administrator, though the account is set up as an Administrator.

     

    How can I set up a fully privileged CMD window by double-clicking a shortcut?

     

    Or maybe more to the point, how can I be a fully-privileged administrator on the desktop full time?

     

    -Noel

    Friday, September 16, 2011 8:28 PM

Answers

  • >>How can I set up a fully privileged CMD window by double-clicking a shortcut?

    You can launch an elevated CMD window, without seeing UAC prompts, without disabling UAC altogether, by following these steps:

    1. Open Start and search for "User Account Control" in Settings
    2. Launch "User Account Control Settings"
    3. Set the slider to "Never notify"
    4. Click "OK"
    5. Create a new shortcut for cmd.exe on the desktop
    6. Open the shortcut's property dialog (rt-click and select properties)
    7. Click Advanced
    8. Check "Run as administrator"
    9. "OK"
    10. "OK"

    Now, when you double click that shortcut, cmd will always launch elevated, and you will not see a UAC dialog.

    I hope this helps.

    Thanks,

    Daniel

     

    • Marked as answer by Noel Carboni Monday, September 19, 2011 9:13 PM
    Monday, September 19, 2011 8:36 PM

All replies

  • This is no longer possible, as it breaks the app container security. If you run explorer.exe elevated (as is the case with UAC turned all the way off), metro style apps no longer work.
    Friday, September 16, 2011 8:58 PM
  • First, thank you for the answer, Ari. It says a lot about Microsoft's direction.

    You folks had to make UAC deconfigurable once. Did you forget why?

    Not having any working Metro apps (or having broken container security) wouldn't be terribly disappointing to me... I'm not into playing games with my computer; I need it for serious work, and I just must be in the minority of people who actually use multiple windows at one time.

    Do you have any plans to make a version of Windows that doesn't offer Metro style apps, for serious users of computers, not people who play with tablets or smart phones? "Windows 8 Professional" perhaps? Don't you actually have to USE Windows yourself to develop software?

    Looks like I may end up driving Windows 7 until the wheels fall off.

    -Noel

    Friday, September 16, 2011 9:58 PM
  • >>How can I set up a fully privileged CMD window by double-clicking a shortcut?

    You can launch an elevated CMD window, without seeing UAC prompts, without disabling UAC altogether, by following these steps:

    1. Open Start and search for "User Account Control" in Settings
    2. Launch "User Account Control Settings"
    3. Set the slider to "Never notify"
    4. Click "OK"
    5. Create a new shortcut for cmd.exe on the desktop
    6. Open the shortcut's property dialog (rt-click and select properties)
    7. Click Advanced
    8. Check "Run as administrator"
    9. "OK"
    10. "OK"

    Now, when you double click that shortcut, cmd will always launch elevated, and you will not see a UAC dialog.

    I hope this helps.

    Thanks,

    Daniel

     

    • Marked as answer by Noel Carboni Monday, September 19, 2011 9:13 PM
    Monday, September 19, 2011 8:36 PM
  • Thank you!  I had stopped looking for [ ] Run As Administrator when I saw it grayed-out in the compatibility dialog.

     

    One other question:  Any way to make it start in a folder other than C:\Windows\system32?

     

    -Noel


    Monday, September 19, 2011 9:10 PM
  • >>One other question: Any way to make it start in a folder other than C:\Windows\system32?

    Yes, you can do this with a short batch script.

    1. Right-click the cmd.exe shortcut you created to run as admin
    2. Click "Properties"
    3. Click the Edit Control next to "Target:"
    4. Replace "c:\windows\system32\cmd.exe" with "c:\windows\system32\cmd.exe /k c:\users\%username%\documents\ChangeLaunchDirectory.bat"
    5. Click "OK"

    Now, create the batch file.

    1. Open Explorer
    2. Navigate to your "Documents" folder (c:\users\%username%\documents)
    3. Create a new text file
    4. Paste the following contents:

    @echo off
    cd /d c:\users\%username%
    @echo on

         5. Save the text file as ChangeLaunchDirectory.bat

    Double click your shortcut and it should launch and admin command prompt, focused on your user profile folder.

    I hope this helps!


    Tuesday, September 20, 2011 10:09 PM
  • Thanks.  That's a bit of a hack of a workaround, though it's clear it can work.

     

    Why not just make CMD start in the folder listed as the "Start in:" folder regardless of whether it's started "As Administrator"?

     

    -Noel

    Tuesday, September 20, 2011 11:55 PM
  • I know this is beside your point and I don't mean to sound like I'm trolling -- but isn't it more secure keep UAC at the default?  I almost never see a prompt, and when I do it's on a fairly rare event (maybe once or twice week, when I'm doing something very deep in the OS).  With the benefits it gives, I really don't mind having to click Yes a few times a month (or press Y when my hands are on the keyboard).

     


    Shawn Keene
    Wednesday, September 21, 2011 12:48 AM
  • It's a fair question.

     

    As a 35 year career software architect engineer I don't make the kinds of mistakes where my system needs protecting from me, and the habits I have developed and the care I take ensure I am not going to be running malware, so...  I simply prefer to be the master of the computer. 

     

    Frankly UAC does nothing for me but get in the way, especially this BS where the file system magically redirects some files to other places.  With Windows 8 I find, for example, that when I want to look around in certain folders, now and again I get "you don't have permission" messages.  It's a sad statement against serious computing that Microsoft should ever think that disabling UAC should no longer be optional because of this laughable "Metro" initiative.  I figured this day would probably come.

     

    I guess I must be rare or a dying breed or something, because Microsoft seems to be taking Windows in a direction AWAY from being the real hard-core computer operating system it ought to be.  I imagine all the highly technical people there have retired as millionaires or billionaires.

     

    -Noel

    Wednesday, September 21, 2011 5:03 AM