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what are cpu architectures supported for building WDM drivers? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi All,

    I like to know if i386,IA32,IA64,AMD64 and ARM the only architectures supported for building WDM drivers or it exists other cpu architectures supported.

    thanks.

    Saturday, October 12, 2013 2:11 PM

Answers

  • Windows only supports CPU's that are little-endian or have a mode to allow them to run that way.  So for example SPARC (and I believe MIPS) have a mode bit and Windows ran on them in the past. 

    As far as I know, every modern CPU is either little endian or has the endian mode bit.


    Don Burn Windows Filesystem and Driver Consulting Website: http://www.windrvr.com Blog: http://msmvps.com/blogs/WinDrvr

    • Marked as answer by Yuri.B Saturday, October 12, 2013 3:27 PM
    Saturday, October 12, 2013 3:16 PM

All replies

  • I386 is IA32 this is supported for all versions of Windows.

    AMD64 which is also used by Intel on the current x86 extended architecture is supported since Windows XP.

    IA64 is Itanium and is supported from Windows Server 2003 to Windows Server 2008

    ARM is supported for Windows 8 and later, but you need to work with Microsoft.

    There were additional architectures supported before Windows 2000.

    So for today the answer is x86, AMD64 and ARM (with authorization) and IA64 pre-Windows 7.


    Don Burn Windows Filesystem and Driver Consulting Website: http://www.windrvr.com Blog: http://msmvps.com/blogs/WinDrvr

    Saturday, October 12, 2013 2:17 PM
  • I386 is IA32 this is supported for all versions of Windows.

    AMD64 which is also used by Intel on the current x86 extended architecture is supported since Windows XP.

    IA64 is Itanium and is supported from Windows Server 2003 to Windows Server 2008

    ARM is supported for Windows 8 and later, but you need to work with Microsoft.

    There were additional architectures supported before Windows 2000.

    So for today the answer is x86, AMD64 and ARM (with authorization) and IA64 pre-Windows 7.


    Don Burn Windows Filesystem and Driver Consulting Website: http://www.windrvr.com Blog: http://msmvps.com/blogs/WinDrvr


    ok, So those are all the supported architectures, is it?
    Saturday, October 12, 2013 2:23 PM
  • Yes unless you want to count PowerPC, MIPS, and Alpha on Windows NT.   Then there were prototypes that never got released for other architectures including SPARC, and some others.   The only requirement is little endian byte ordering.


    Don Burn Windows Filesystem and Driver Consulting Website: http://www.windrvr.com Blog: http://msmvps.com/blogs/WinDrvr

    Saturday, October 12, 2013 2:39 PM
  • Yes unless you want to count PowerPC, MIPS, and Alpha on Windows NT.   Then there were prototypes that never got released for other architectures including SPARC, and some others.   The only requirement is little endian byte ordering.


    Don Burn Windows Filesystem and Driver Consulting Website: http://www.windrvr.com Blog: http://msmvps.com/blogs/WinDrvr


    so you want to say is that windows supports only little-endian cpu?
    Saturday, October 12, 2013 3:03 PM
  • Windows only supports CPU's that are little-endian or have a mode to allow them to run that way.  So for example SPARC (and I believe MIPS) have a mode bit and Windows ran on them in the past. 

    As far as I know, every modern CPU is either little endian or has the endian mode bit.


    Don Burn Windows Filesystem and Driver Consulting Website: http://www.windrvr.com Blog: http://msmvps.com/blogs/WinDrvr

    • Marked as answer by Yuri.B Saturday, October 12, 2013 3:27 PM
    Saturday, October 12, 2013 3:16 PM
  • Windows only supports CPU's that are little-endian or have a mode to allow them to run that way.  So for example SPARC (and I believe MIPS) have a mode bit and Windows ran on them in the past. 

    As far as I know, every modern CPU is either little endian or has the endian mode bit.


    Don Burn Windows Filesystem and Driver Consulting Website: http://www.windrvr.com Blog: http://msmvps.com/blogs/WinDrvr


    I understand now, thanks!
    Saturday, October 12, 2013 3:27 PM