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Can I develop and debug Metro applications in Win7 with the Visual Studio 11 developer preview?

    Question

  • At the build conference I installed Visual Studio 11 on my Windows 7 ultimate laptop from the USB drive we were given, but when I open VS there are no templates for the Metro style apps (specifically looking for the JavaScript templates). I figured that even if I didn't have Windows 8 installed that I might still be able to test my apps in the simulator or look at WinRT via intellisense and see whats available.

    Is it possible to download the templates somewhere? Or do I have to be running Windows 8 in order to use any of this

    Thursday, September 15, 2011 10:05 PM

Answers

  • Metro style apps can be developed in Windows 8 only. So, you need to have Windows 8.


    Devesh Kumar Nayyar
    • Marked as answer by Drewdah Thursday, September 15, 2011 10:12 PM
    Thursday, September 15, 2011 10:11 PM

All replies

  • Metro style apps can be developed in Windows 8 only. So, you need to have Windows 8.


    Devesh Kumar Nayyar
    • Marked as answer by Drewdah Thursday, September 15, 2011 10:12 PM
    Thursday, September 15, 2011 10:11 PM
  • For this build release you will need to not only have Windows 8, but also need the WinRT installed. This can be acquired for //Build/ by using the Windows Developer Preview build (with tools installed).


    Visual Studio & .NET Framework Deployment Program Manager
    Friday, September 16, 2011 3:09 PM
  • DOH! 

    This would have been nice to know (say, oh, I don't know, via a readme.txt on the USB drive) before all 8,000 of us waste an hour or two installing on Win7 for no purpose.

    Saturday, September 17, 2011 10:16 PM
  • Thanks for confirming that this was the issue. It would be useful for more of the sites talking about Metro apps to state this explicitly, maybe most people close to issue think this is in the "bleeding obvious" category! Are there any other things that you don't get on Windows 7 with Visual Studio 11 other than the WinRT stuff?

    I'm sort of interested in what stops the back port of WinRT to Windows 7, other than marketing issues. Obviously the compiler can run and presumably most of the rest of the support is done by various libraries. Is there really stuff baked into the OS that precludes a back port. The reason I am interested is that the clients my company develop software for are only now in the middle of the XP->Windows 7 upgrade and it'll be a few years till they will want to stomach another upgrade. It would be nice to give them some compelling reasons why the back port is impossible other than marketing.

    Wednesday, September 21, 2011 1:35 AM
  • Missed another related question.

    Given that C++/CX compiles native I assume there are some performance benefits relative to C++/CLI. However if I call a C++/CX built library from C# would this be expected to be faster than the equivalent C++/CLI to C# hop. In general we try to reduce the number of managed to unmanged transitions in our code, is this all different now in terms of where you take the performance hits? Is there any documentation describing this sort of stuff?

    Wednesday, September 21, 2011 1:42 AM
  • Might I suggest you look at some of the build conference videos because they really explain a lot about it. From the videos I've seen so far, as I understand it metro apps will never run on anything lower than Win8 (what you call the 'backport'), because the windows kernel had to be radically redesigned to incorporate WinRT features in memory management, program execution etc. I think it's technical reasons, not marketing reasons that dictate this. Here's a really good (in my opinion) video on windows compatibility which explains much why Win8 is a different beast:

    http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/BUILD/BUILD2011/APP-116T

    So I guess the answer to your question is if your customer wants metro style apps, they must go Win8. If they want desktop programs, then the advantages are the perfomance improvements that are explained in many of the build videos from keynote #1 onwards. If those advantages don't sway them, then they sit tight, I guess. That upgrade decision process is the same as it has always been for any software on the market.

    But the good news is (once again, my opinion) all things being equal, your desktop software will run on both Win7 & Win8. MS could have cut the cord on older Win versions software, but they chose not to, & I for one am thankful for that.

    Wednesday, September 21, 2011 10:57 AM
  • - So, does this mean we cannot use a Win8 consumer preview (along with VS11 beta) to develop metro apps?

    - If we can then where should we download WinRT (I could not find). Is there any additional thing I need to install on Win8 CP in order to develop metro apps?

    For this build release you will need to not only have Windows 8, but also need the WinRT installed. This can be acquired for //Build/ by using the Windows Developer Preview build (with tools installed).

    Tuesday, March 6, 2012 5:45 AM
  • Hi Sarmadys,

    You're fine with the Consumer Preview and Visual Studio 11 beta. The rest of this thread was referring to the requirements when using the Developer Preview build back in September.

    --Rob

    Tuesday, March 6, 2012 5:48 AM
    Owner