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low tech concrete vibrator RRS feed

  • General discussion

  • hey all,

    I made my own that seems to work pretty well.

    Very low tech.

    Took a piece of 2 foot rebar - slightly bent (aren't they all) and chucked it into my trusty old (very old) 120V plug in drill. That was trial one - it did not work well - more like an eggbeater.

    Second try I cleaned up the rebar and stuck the rebar in to a 2 foot iron pipe (3/4 inch) and taped the bottom end shut.

    Turn on the drill and it shakes the pipe like a mad thing. I saw lots of movement and lots of air.

    Really shook me too as I had to hold on to the drill with one hand and the pipe with the other.

    The vibrator I am making is Asin: B07BF5J4Y4 on Amazon.

    Wish I had that when I was filling my cores....


    • Edited by mctoor Tuesday, April 24, 2018 3:03 AM
    Tuesday, April 24, 2018 3:02 AM

All replies

  • Why did you bother posting that in this Forum?

    My soon to be shipped Land Crab says he don't care.


    La vida loca

    Tuesday, April 24, 2018 3:28 AM
  • Do you have any ideas ?
    Tuesday, April 24, 2018 5:34 AM
  • What do you think of this vibrator by Asin: B07BF5J4Y4 on Amazon ?

    Any help ?
    Wednesday, May 2, 2018 3:02 AM
  • Wen I search that model number, I get to a page describing a device used for putting foam back on to of a flat glass of beer. If that is the device you are referring to, it is actually an ultrasonic device. The ultrasound vibrations move from the base of the unit through some water which is used as a coupling agent and into the bottom of the beer glass. Don't forget that the ultrasound vibrations are actually mechanical waves causing pressure rises and drops at what ever the frequency of the ultrasound generator. Once inside the beer, the device works by activating the bubbles. During the drop (negative) part of the wave, the bubbles will expand because the pressure outside the bubble is lower than ambient. And when the pressure rise (positive) occurs the bubble gets smaller. If there is a fair bit of positive pressure, the bubble will actually implode and release a lot of shock wave energy into the beer. This is called "cavitation". That makes more gas bubbles appear.    
    Friday, August 31, 2018 6:52 PM