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.NET Framework Configuration Tool

    Question

  • Where is the .NET Framework Configuration Tool in Vista?  I have a .NET 2.0 application running on Vista that gets the error:  Application attempted to perform an operation not allowed byt the security policy.
    Monday, July 30, 2007 4:18 PM

All replies

  • By far the easiest way is to just start typing it into the Start menu search box. I find it appears by the time I've finished typing .net

    Monday, July 30, 2007 5:10 PM
  • No such luck on my side.  It's in Administrative Tools in XP.  Do you have to install the .NET Framework SDK on Vista in order to get it?  Vista comes with .NET 2.0 and .NET 3.0 which has the WPF components.  If its there could you be a little  more specific?  Thanks!
    Monday, July 30, 2007 5:18 PM
  •  

    I don't believe so, I think it should be installed by default, but I don't think it has a Start menu entry. If searching for it using the start menu search box doesn't work, you could always access it the long way:

     

    Run mmc.exe (the management console)

    Go to File -> Add new snap-in

    Add the .net framework 2.0 configuration tool

    Monday, July 30, 2007 10:09 PM
  •  

    I have ran the mmc.exe but I do not have a snap-in for .net framework 2.0 configuration tool.  There is no .NET snap-ins at all.

     

     

    Monday, July 30, 2007 10:14 PM
  • I have the same problem with my Vista PC (pre-installed with Vista Business), there is no snap-in or configuration wizard in my control panel.  Any ideas ?

     

    Tuesday, August 21, 2007 8:53 PM
  • me too, cant make even a simple rename a file operation work in vs2008 oracas, getting real mad, cant find a configuratiopn thing anywhere, the one in mmc dont have a security tab as described

    Wednesday, August 22, 2007 11:33 PM
  • Same problem here, Vista Ultimate, new fresh PC with a VS2008 beta 2 install (no previous dev tools), I can't locate the .NET configuration panel.

    All suggestion appreciated.

    If anyone has resolved this or doesn't have the problem in the first place please post.

    Thanks.
    Tuesday, October 09, 2007 10:24 PM
  • Guys,

     

    You have to install the .Net Framework 2.0 SDK. You maybe uninstalled it before installing VS2008 Beta 2

    Wednesday, November 14, 2007 6:49 PM
  • Late post but...

    The other way is to use the caspol.exe command line program that comes with the .net framework if you do not want to install the SDK.

    Sunday, March 09, 2008 9:46 PM
  • I think the main reason why this post remains unanswered is we want to know the answers to the following questions:
    is it necessary to get the clients to install the SDK and manually tweak the security policies to run our application?
    If yes, it is a usability issue, if not, the what is the right way to develop a software on .NET so that it is given the required priviledges it needed to complete its tasks, but not compromising security?
    Friday, October 10, 2008 3:18 PM
  • You can generate an MSI to configure security policies from within the .Net Framework Configuration Tool, so it shouldn't be necessary to install the full SDK on client machines.

    Friday, October 10, 2008 3:22 PM
  • This is a pretty old thread, but I hope this post helps resolve the issue.

     

    Microsoft moved the .NET Framework configuration tool from the redistributable to the SDK starting from version 2.0 of the framework because they believe such a GUI is an advanced feature that is more appropriate to an SDK. Many end users found it strange to see administrative tools related to a product called the .NET Framework that they did not know was even installed on their system.

     

    The official way to administer security settings on a system that only has the redistributable installed is to use caspol.exe (as mentioned previously in this thread). In-depth information on using caspol.exe can be found at http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/a0ke3k86.aspx.

     

    If you absolutely need to use the .NET Framework configuration tool, the official way to get it is to install the SDK. The tool is packaged as an MMC snap-in called mscorcfg.msc. You can read more about an unsupported way on Aaron Stebner's blog at http://blogs.msdn.com/astebner/archive/2006/01/23/516671.aspx.

     

    To answer your questions:

     

    "is it necessary to get the clients to install the SDK and manually tweak the security policies to run our application? If yes, it is a usability issue, if not, the what is the right way to develop a software on .NET so that it is given the required priviledges it needed to complete its tasks, but not compromising security?"

     

    I'd say no. I don't see why a typical user would need to change any of the security policies:

     * By default, any .NET Framework application running from the local file system is granted full trust and the application can do almost anything that the user has permission to do (if the user has administrative privileges, the application can do "virtually" anything)

     * A system administrator might want to limit what an application could possibly do when it is run by a certain user or group of users. If this limitation is preventing the application from behaving correctly, this is a problem that the user would need to resolve with the system administrator. As a .NET Framework applications developer, it'd be a good idea to learn how Code Access Security (CAS) works - it'd be a good idea to demand for certain permissions (imperatively) in your code and if not granted, your application might fail gracefully such as providing some meaningful feedback to the user, etc. Here's an example:

     

    // C#

    public static void CreateFolder(string folderName)

    {

      try

      {

        FileIOPermission filePermissions = new FileIOPermission(FileIOPermissionAccess.Write, @"C:\Program Files\");

        filePermissions.Demand();

        // create the folder

      }

      catch

      {

        // error-handling logic

      }

    }

     

    • Proposed as answer by ADSIO Friday, August 14, 2009 4:34 PM
    Saturday, October 11, 2008 5:56 AM
  • Right Click On the Program and select , Run Program as Administrator , that should do it
    it worked for me :)
    good luck :)
    Friday, August 14, 2009 4:35 PM