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Creating strmbase.lib release

    Question

  • I am having trouble finding the strmbase.lib file for DirectShow programming. I did some checking and found this thread:

    http://forums.microsoft.com/MSDN/ShowPost.aspx?PostID=1313961&SiteID=1

    The origional poster still seems to have problems after pointing to strmbasd as opposed to strmbase.lib. I was wondering how to build the release version, step by step? Hopefully this will avoid the problems he was having. Thanks in advance.
    Wednesday, April 16, 2008 8:26 PM

Answers

  • Strmbasd.lib is not included in the SDK \lib directory.  You need to build it yourself by building the \Multimedia\DirectShow\baseclasses sample first. 

     

    Strmbasd.lib is created when making a debug build of the baseclasses sample.  Strmbase.lib comes from a release build of the baseclasses. If you want to create a release build, you can do it from within Visual Studio IDE or at the command line of the Windows SDK.

     

    Windows SDK Command Line build environment

    The Windows SDK build environment opens automatically in Debug mode, and by default builds Debug builds.  You can use setenv commands to switch to Release mode:

    1.       Open the Windows SDK CMD shell (Start > All Programs > Windows SDK v6.1 > SDK CMD Shell).  This will work with older versions of the Windows SDKs too.

    2.       Type: setenv /release

    3.       The CMD shell will switch from yellow text (debug) to green text (release).

    4.       Build your sample as you usually do:

     

      • Code Snippet
        • Build a makefile by typing nmake
        • Build a .csproj file by typing msbuild *.csproj /p:platform=[win32 | X64 | IA64]
        • Build a .vbproj file by typing msbuild *.vbproj /p:platform=[win32 | X64 | IA64]
        • Build a .sln file by typing msbuild *.sln /p:platform=[win32 | X64 | IA64]
        • Build a .vcproj by typing vcbuild *.vcproj /platform=[win32 | X64 | IA64]

         

         

    From within the Visual Studio IDE

    Visual Studio opens by default in Debug mode, and by default builds Debug builds.  You can easily switch to Release mode.

    1.      When you open your sample in Visual Studio IDE you’ll see a green arrow pointing to the right next to the word “Debug” on the tool bar.  

    2.      Use the drop down menu to change “Debug” to “Release.”

    3.      Or you can open the configuration manager to set to “Release” from the menu bar: Project, Properties, Configuration Manager.  Use the pull down menu on the top of the configuration manager window to change your build settings to Release.

     

    --Karin

     

    ||Karin Meier||Windows SDK PM||Build Environment.Samples.Community ||http://blogs.msdn.com/KarinM||

     

    Sunday, April 20, 2008 12:45 AM

All replies

  • Strmbasd.lib is not included in the SDK \lib directory.  You need to build it yourself by building the \Multimedia\DirectShow\baseclasses sample first. 

     

    Strmbasd.lib is created when making a debug build of the baseclasses sample.  Strmbase.lib comes from a release build of the baseclasses. If you want to create a release build, you can do it from within Visual Studio IDE or at the command line of the Windows SDK.

     

    Windows SDK Command Line build environment

    The Windows SDK build environment opens automatically in Debug mode, and by default builds Debug builds.  You can use setenv commands to switch to Release mode:

    1.       Open the Windows SDK CMD shell (Start > All Programs > Windows SDK v6.1 > SDK CMD Shell).  This will work with older versions of the Windows SDKs too.

    2.       Type: setenv /release

    3.       The CMD shell will switch from yellow text (debug) to green text (release).

    4.       Build your sample as you usually do:

     

      • Code Snippet
        • Build a makefile by typing nmake
        • Build a .csproj file by typing msbuild *.csproj /p:platform=[win32 | X64 | IA64]
        • Build a .vbproj file by typing msbuild *.vbproj /p:platform=[win32 | X64 | IA64]
        • Build a .sln file by typing msbuild *.sln /p:platform=[win32 | X64 | IA64]
        • Build a .vcproj by typing vcbuild *.vcproj /platform=[win32 | X64 | IA64]

         

         

    From within the Visual Studio IDE

    Visual Studio opens by default in Debug mode, and by default builds Debug builds.  You can easily switch to Release mode.

    1.      When you open your sample in Visual Studio IDE you’ll see a green arrow pointing to the right next to the word “Debug” on the tool bar.  

    2.      Use the drop down menu to change “Debug” to “Release.”

    3.      Or you can open the configuration manager to set to “Release” from the menu bar: Project, Properties, Configuration Manager.  Use the pull down menu on the top of the configuration manager window to change your build settings to Release.

     

    --Karin

     

    ||Karin Meier||Windows SDK PM||Build Environment.Samples.Community ||http://blogs.msdn.com/KarinM||

     

    Sunday, April 20, 2008 12:45 AM
  • Thanks, I knew it had to be something simple.
    Thursday, April 24, 2008 12:16 PM
  • Great!  I’m glad it worked.  Sometimes what seems simple is not very obvious.  I’m going to write a blog post about this.  I’m sure others are running into the same problem.

     

    --Karin

     

    ||Karin Meier||Windows SDK PM||Build Environment.Samples.Community ||http://blogs.msdn.com/KarinM||

     

    • Proposed as answer by Mido C.NET Sunday, February 01, 2009 11:22 AM
    Thursday, April 24, 2008 3:28 PM
  • Thank you
    Sunday, February 01, 2009 11:27 AM