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Video editing like "DirectShow Editing Services"

    Question

  • Will Media Foundation support video editing like DirectShow Editing Services?
    Thanks, Amol Patki
    Thursday, August 27, 2009 1:39 PM

Answers

  • Are you looking at supporting Windows 7 only?  If not, look at the support for decoders in the MF docs.  In Vista you are limited to a couple of formats supported in Windows itself, there is no support for Windows prior to Vista for MF.  Given that and the fact that there are very few samples for MF, you're better off going with dshow to implement an editing system even if DES isn't sufficient for your needs (example: the SDK used for transitions and effects is deprecated and has no x64 support, AFIAK).  As I pointed out to you in the dshow forum, implementing an editing system is a big project.
    Please use Vote As Helpful (green up arrow at top-left of posts) and Mark As Answer where appropriate.
    My dshow site is http://tmhare.mvps.org.
    • Marked as answer by Amol P Wednesday, September 02, 2009 4:54 PM
    Monday, August 31, 2009 9:35 PM

All replies

  • Media Foundation is part of the Operating System SDK which means it's core to the OS. DirectShow is an API with a higher level of abstraction that facilitates that kind of functionality out-of-the-box. You can achieve the same effect with Media Foundation but with a lot more work.
    Friday, August 28, 2009 12:01 PM
  • If you mean does MF have DES functionality now, AFAIK, no it does not.  It is something that you could implement on top of MF yourself.  It would be a lot of work as the other poster pointed out.

    If you mean will MF ever have a DES layer, the answer is maybe.  MSFT does not generally pre-announce features.  Since new MF features have thus far followed Windows releases, it is unlikely that you will see this feature, if it comes, for some years.

    As far as the other poster's distinction between MF and dshow and their relation to Windows, I'm not clear on what he means.  Dshow and DES in qedit.dll have been part of the standard Windows end user distribution for many years.  The dshow SDK used to be part of the DirectX SDK but has been included with the Windows SDK longer than MF has existed in the Windows SDK. 

     
    Please use Vote As Helpful (green up arrow at top-left of posts) and Mark As Answer where appropriate.
    My dshow site is http://tmhare.mvps.org.
    Friday, August 28, 2009 2:49 PM
  • I was trying to simplisticly point out the difference between the extent of Windows SDK functionality versus focused API functionality. It would be similar to comparing assembly to a higher level programming language.
    Saturday, August 29, 2009 3:11 AM
  • I'm not clear on the distinction you're trying to make.  DES is part of dshow which is part of Windows.  It is not something you install separately.  For developer support, there are many parts of the Windows SDK, including MF, dshow, WMP, etc.  I don't see how MF is more "core to the OS" than dshow.
    Please use Vote As Helpful (green up arrow at top-left of posts) and Mark As Answer where appropriate.
    My dshow site is http://tmhare.mvps.org.
    Sunday, August 30, 2009 2:03 PM
  • Thanks guys. I think implementing something like DES over MF, is going to be really tough. Any hints how and where to start!!!
    Thanks, Amol Patki
    Monday, August 31, 2009 4:00 PM
  • Are you looking at supporting Windows 7 only?  If not, look at the support for decoders in the MF docs.  In Vista you are limited to a couple of formats supported in Windows itself, there is no support for Windows prior to Vista for MF.  Given that and the fact that there are very few samples for MF, you're better off going with dshow to implement an editing system even if DES isn't sufficient for your needs (example: the SDK used for transitions and effects is deprecated and has no x64 support, AFIAK).  As I pointed out to you in the dshow forum, implementing an editing system is a big project.
    Please use Vote As Helpful (green up arrow at top-left of posts) and Mark As Answer where appropriate.
    My dshow site is http://tmhare.mvps.org.
    • Marked as answer by Amol P Wednesday, September 02, 2009 4:54 PM
    Monday, August 31, 2009 9:35 PM
  • I have already built a video editing product using DES timeline, effects and transitions around 2 years back. If I want to start a video editing product now which technology should I use? You are absolutely right, that implementing a editing system in DS is a big project and will also need lot of resources. My problem is I am not able to decide which technology should I adopt for my new video editing product. Or should it again be the old DES???


    Thanks, Amol Patki
    Tuesday, September 01, 2009 6:14 AM
  • Look at the limitations I outlined above with MF.  For most people the fact that Vista has limited decoder and encoder support means that it is not a good choice for a product with a broad market base.  Combine this with there is no XP support at all for MF.  There are many more 3rd party filters available for dshow.  Windows 7 isn't releasing until October.  Finally, limitations of using DES have been stated earlier in the other thread and here.
    Please use Vote As Helpful (green up arrow at top-left of posts) and Mark As Answer where appropriate.
    My dshow site is http://tmhare.mvps.org.
    Tuesday, September 01, 2009 9:07 PM
  • I'm not clear on the distinction you're trying to make.  DES is part of dshow which is part of Windows.  It is not something you install separately.  For developer support, there are many parts of the Windows SDK, including MF, dshow, WMP, etc.  I don't see how MF is more "core to the OS" than dshow.
    Please use Vote As Helpful (green up arrow at top-left of posts) and Mark As Answer where appropriate.
    My dshow site is http://tmhare.mvps.org.

    I always thought DirectShow originally shipped with DirectX before Direct2D became depricated
    Thursday, September 03, 2009 5:34 PM
  • Dshow runtimes including quartz.dll and qedit.dll (DES) were included in Windows XP RTM and are including in Vista and Windows 7.  The dshow SDK was included in the DX SDK until it moved into the Windows (Platform) SDK in early 2005 but that was only important to developers.

    Direct2D is a new technology and is not deprecated:



    Please use Vote As Helpful (green up arrow at top-left of posts) and Mark As Answer where appropriate.
    My dshow site is http://tmhare.mvps.org.
    Thursday, September 03, 2009 10:14 PM
  • Haha, shows how long i've been out of the loop on that one. I'm going way back to DX5 when Direct2D was an interface independent of Direct3D. It was ported to Direct3D for a while then completely removed for years. Would DirectShow be stable enough for an intensive enterprise solution though? (i.e. reliability across platforms)
    Friday, September 04, 2009 1:37 AM
  • I think you're remembering DirectDraw as Direct2D :)

    Dshow is the basis of thousands of applications in the multimedia space.  WMP is based heavily on it although less so with more recent versions.  WM Encoder and MovieMaker and other MS apps too.

    Please use Vote As Helpful (green up arrow at top-left of posts) and Mark As Answer where appropriate.
    My dshow site is http://tmhare.mvps.org.
    Friday, September 04, 2009 2:34 AM