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Why can't I directly host desktop applications on the Windows 8 Marketplace?

    Question

  • //Apologies for posting in the wrong forum and categories!

    Hey Microsoft of all the design choices that I don't like on Windows 8, this is the one that has really been bugging me!

    From what I have been reading on various tech news/blog sites you guys want to emulate Apple and their products (notably the iPad and iPhone) so why on your desktop OS (which by the way has the most users when compared to the competition of Mac OS X, Linux, BSD...) do you not allow us developers to host our desktop apps in an equal fashion to your Metro ones?

    Both Mac OS X's App Store and the Ubuntu Software Centre both allow the hosting of desktop applications and I think that by not allowing this (plus removing the traditional Start menu, deprecating Gadgets, Metroising IE10) you are most certainly alienating yourselves from software developers and potential software developers like me who these days rely on marketplaces like the App Store, Google Play and Steam to generate income.

    All I ask from this post is that I get a response that answers my question about desktop app hosting (Metro does work in some places, but definitely not everywhere!) and why it seems that you want to deprecate the very desktop that has made Windows successful for the last 20 years or so!

    Inferno986return

    PS: Why is the address bar in Metroised IE10 on the bottom of the browser? That is just absurd!

    Tuesday, June 05, 2012 10:43 AM

Answers

  • Hi Inferno986return,

    You are correct that in the Windows 8 Consumer Preview, that Desktop Apps were not allowed to be submitted. With the Windows 8 Release Preview, we will allow for Desktop Apps to be submitted, once the Windows Store is open for Submissions.

    To Submit a Desktop App:
     
    1) The Developer Must be registered as a business.   
    2) Must have gone through the desktop logo certification process
    3) As a business, in the developer portal, you can choose from a list that   includes your approved/validated desktop logos that have gone through the   desktop logo certification process.   
    4) You can then select and have those apps listed in the Store’s desktop   app
    listing service.

    The Desktop is still a vital part of Windows 8 and is not going away. It may have been redesigned, but the features that users are use to are still there, just accessed a little differntly.

    I hope this helps.

    Thanks

    Hello Mark_1h,

    This question was primarily aimed at the Release Preview (where to my understanding) developers can only hosting internet links to their 
    software via the developer's website (as shown here in Section 2B).

    That and other evidence (such as the removal of desktop app development in the new Visual Studio Express Edition) show that Microsoft seems to be at the very least discouraging desktop application development (especially for n00bies like me).

    I personally think that Microsoft should take a Yin-Yang approach to Metro and desktop apps by hosting them equally and allowing both to thrive.

    I think that some kinds of apps such as little games (like Angry Birds and Cut the Rope) and utilities (like a Weather app or a Unit Convertor) are superior in the Metro and feel awkward outside of it (though I do think that Metro apps do need a better interface and a dedicated close button).

    Sorry I took a while to reply but my e-mail didn't flag up that your replied. Not sure who's fault it is, probably mine. :-)

    Inferno986return

    • Edited by Inferno986return Wednesday, June 06, 2012 5:08 PM Formatting, general fixes..
    • Marked as answer by mark_1h Wednesday, September 26, 2012 9:09 PM
    Wednesday, June 06, 2012 5:03 PM

All replies

  • Hi Inferno986return,

    You are correct that in the Windows 8 Consumer Preview, that Desktop Apps were not allowed to be submitted. With the Windows 8 Release Preview, we will allow for Desktop Apps to be submitted, once the Windows Store is open for Submissions.

    To Submit a Desktop App:
     
    1) The Developer Must be registered as a business.   
    2) Must have gone through the desktop logo certification process
    3) As a business, in the developer portal, you can choose from a list that   includes your approved/validated desktop logos that have gone through the   desktop logo certification process.   
    4) You can then select and have those apps listed in the Store’s desktop   app
    listing service.

    The Desktop is still a vital part of Windows 8 and is not going away. It may have been redesigned, but the features that users are use to are still there, just accessed a little differntly.

    I hope this helps.

    Thanks

    Tuesday, June 05, 2012 1:45 PM
  • Hi Inferno986return,

    You are correct that in the Windows 8 Consumer Preview, that Desktop Apps were not allowed to be submitted. With the Windows 8 Release Preview, we will allow for Desktop Apps to be submitted, once the Windows Store is open for Submissions.

    To Submit a Desktop App:
     
    1) The Developer Must be registered as a business.   
    2) Must have gone through the desktop logo certification process
    3) As a business, in the developer portal, you can choose from a list that   includes your approved/validated desktop logos that have gone through the   desktop logo certification process.   
    4) You can then select and have those apps listed in the Store’s desktop   app
    listing service.

    The Desktop is still a vital part of Windows 8 and is not going away. It may have been redesigned, but the features that users are use to are still there, just accessed a little differntly.

    I hope this helps.

    Thanks

    Hello Mark_1h,

    This question was primarily aimed at the Release Preview (where to my understanding) developers can only hosting internet links to their 
    software via the developer's website (as shown here in Section 2B).

    That and other evidence (such as the removal of desktop app development in the new Visual Studio Express Edition) show that Microsoft seems to be at the very least discouraging desktop application development (especially for n00bies like me).

    I personally think that Microsoft should take a Yin-Yang approach to Metro and desktop apps by hosting them equally and allowing both to thrive.

    I think that some kinds of apps such as little games (like Angry Birds and Cut the Rope) and utilities (like a Weather app or a Unit Convertor) are superior in the Metro and feel awkward outside of it (though I do think that Metro apps do need a better interface and a dedicated close button).

    Sorry I took a while to reply but my e-mail didn't flag up that your replied. Not sure who's fault it is, probably mine. :-)

    Inferno986return

    • Edited by Inferno986return Wednesday, June 06, 2012 5:08 PM Formatting, general fixes..
    • Marked as answer by mark_1h Wednesday, September 26, 2012 9:09 PM
    Wednesday, June 06, 2012 5:03 PM
  • Hi Inferno986return,

    You are correct that the Windows store will display tiles for Desktop apps, but what you will see will be a link to an external site for download. The Windows Store will not host the App.

    I would recommend posting to the Tools Sections  of the forum, for your question about the Desktop app development in Visual Studio 2012 Beta. They should be able to better assist you.

    Thank you for your feedback.

    Wednesday, June 06, 2012 6:26 PM
  • Hi Inferno986return,

    You are correct that the Windows store will display tiles for Desktop apps, but what you will see will be a link to an external site for download. The Windows Store will not host the App.

    I would recommend posting to the Tools Sections  of the forum, for your question about the Desktop app development in Visual Studio 2012 Beta. They should be able to better assist you.

    Thank you for your feedback.

    So Mark_1h, the question is "Why doesn't Microsoft directly host desktop apps and only allow an indirect link for them?".

    I was hoping (as I mentioned in detail in my last post) that Microsoft would have been clever and accommodated the development of both app types equally, I think this should be something that should be raised in a design discussion.

    I think the key to Windows 8's success would be to make sure you introduce something(s) that is(are) new and intuitive but at the same time upgrading what the user already has. I also think that it was a mistake deprecating the desktop gadgets too in that respect (does anyone at Microsoft use Android?).

    I will certainly do some further digging and discussion at the Tools Section about the Visual Studio 2012 IDE, but at the end of the day I am not that fussed and don't mind starting off development with a free alternative like Code::Blocks or DevC++. Besides Visual Studio (as of the 2011 release it seems) does NOT have support for the Java programming language so I would need a separate IDE anyway.

    Thanks for your help as always,

    Inferno986return


    Wednesday, June 06, 2012 7:47 PM