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Displaying Good Quality Graphics in a large Simulation

    Question

  • Hi Guys and Gals,

    My first forum post here so lets hope I get a good solution :D. Im a 4th year student at SLIIT (Sri Lanka Institute of Information Technology) and Im doing my final year project right now. Our group decided to build a traffic flow simulator that simulates real life scenarios (100 vehicles heading in one direction, the roads getting jammed, etc. etc) using AI agents (cars mostly).

    Now the question I want to ask is, I will have to show all these entities moving around, and since we plan to model a large area there will be lots of objects moving around and interacting with each other. Im pretty new to C# (I used mainly Java) and I doubt the best way to show all this graphics is to just dump them on the main form . So whats the best way to showcase all of this?

    By the way the elements will be 2D (sprites?) initially, but there will be lots of them. We might want to make it into a 3d vis thing but thats not immediate. In any case whats the best way to show off everything without the program lagging?

    Thanks in advanced for the help
    Tuesday, January 23, 2007 9:28 AM

Answers

  • To do such type of thing, You better Consider Managed DirectX and use it with C#. Its capable of rendering high class graphics (2D and 3D) both. To work with DirectX you need DirectX SDK which can be download from www.Microsoft.com freely.

    Simply do a google search download and start playing with it.

    Best Regards,

    Rizwan aka RizwanSharp

    Tuesday, January 23, 2007 3:23 PM
  • Hi,

      as Rizwan mentioned Direct3D is definitely a good way to go, also if you look into .Net 3.0 which has Windows Presentation Framework (WPF) you can create complex 2D and 3D graphics relatively easily, it is worth looking into.

     

    Mark.

    Tuesday, January 23, 2007 3:48 PM

All replies

  • To do such type of thing, You better Consider Managed DirectX and use it with C#. Its capable of rendering high class graphics (2D and 3D) both. To work with DirectX you need DirectX SDK which can be download from www.Microsoft.com freely.

    Simply do a google search download and start playing with it.

    Best Regards,

    Rizwan aka RizwanSharp

    Tuesday, January 23, 2007 3:23 PM
  • Hi,

      as Rizwan mentioned Direct3D is definitely a good way to go, also if you look into .Net 3.0 which has Windows Presentation Framework (WPF) you can create complex 2D and 3D graphics relatively easily, it is worth looking into.

     

    Mark.

    Tuesday, January 23, 2007 3:48 PM
  •  Mark Dawson wrote:

    Hi,

      as Rizwan mentioned Direct3D is definitely a good way to go, also if you look into .Net 3.0 which has Windows Presentation Framework (WPF) you can create complex 2D and 3D graphics relatively easily, it is worth looking into.

     

    Mark.

    Thanks Mark for pointing the WPF, Yes You must consider using WPF better than DirectX because next generation of applications are goinh to be developed using WPF so your experience will be with you forever in contrast if you use DirectX you'll be specific to the Game Programming.

    Thank Again Mark ,

    Best Regards,

    Rizwan aka RizwanSharp

    Tuesday, January 23, 2007 3:59 PM
  • Hi Guys !

    Thanks for the quick reply. Yeah I heard of WPF used in a new news reader (made by MS and NY Times I think). In any case will I be able to use this framework if I am using Visual C# 2005? I have .NET framework 2.0 right now. So if I upgrade it can I carry out that work on Visial C# 2005? And any other speacial requirements I might need to start working on this ?

    Thanks
    Thursday, January 25, 2007 5:04 AM
  • Hi,

      you will need .Net 3.0 which comes installed with Windows Vista or as a seperate download for Windows XP SP2 or Windows Server 2003.  You can also download an addon for visual studio to create WPF projects.  You might also want to look into Microsoft Expression tools which are used for creating XAML content like Flash.

     

    Mark.

    Thursday, January 25, 2007 7:31 AM
  • Hi Mark

    thanks for the information. This has been really useful and it has cleared up a lot of foggy areas in our project.

    John

    Thursday, January 25, 2007 11:05 AM