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Macros in Visual Studio 11 Developer Preview

    Question

  • Have macros been stripped from Visual Studio 11 completely? I can't find any reference to them, or panes like Macro Explorer, in the Developer Preview build. Or, is it just that they're not in this particular build?

    The docs for them aren't present in the MSDN Library either, except for one page in a different location to where it has been, containing a broken link: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-gb/library/ms165619(VS.110).aspx

    Wednesday, September 28, 2011 3:17 PM

Answers

  • In this version of Visual Studio, while there are literally hundreds of features, there are some we’ve actually taken out. One of those is the macros automation feature, including macro record/replay, macro projects and the Macros IDE. While we know that macros have been valuable for those who use them, unfortunately our usage data shows that less than 1% of Visual Studio developers take advantage of this feature. Therefore, we’ve found ourselves investing more deeply in the Visual Studio areas that get used every day, and have not updated macros for several releases.

    Even without providing any functional improvements though, macros have required ongoing investment due to the high bar we hold for compatibility, security, accessibility, and other requirements we follow for all features, every Visual Studio release. Ultimately, we were no longer able to justify the cost of continuing to maintain macros compared to other features that were being more widely used. Since Visual Studio 2010 and continuing with Visual Studio 11 Developer Preview, Microsoft has invested heavily in better automation facilities using extensions. In fact much of the automation accomplished through the macros features can be accomplished with functionality in Visual Studio extensions.

    Here are some further resources that we recommend, when setting out to author an extension:

     http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/vstudio/ff718165

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/vstudio/ff677564

    Wednesday, September 28, 2011 6:00 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • In this version of Visual Studio, while there are literally hundreds of features, there are some we’ve actually taken out. One of those is the macros automation feature, including macro record/replay, macro projects and the Macros IDE. While we know that macros have been valuable for those who use them, unfortunately our usage data shows that less than 1% of Visual Studio developers take advantage of this feature. Therefore, we’ve found ourselves investing more deeply in the Visual Studio areas that get used every day, and have not updated macros for several releases.

    Even without providing any functional improvements though, macros have required ongoing investment due to the high bar we hold for compatibility, security, accessibility, and other requirements we follow for all features, every Visual Studio release. Ultimately, we were no longer able to justify the cost of continuing to maintain macros compared to other features that were being more widely used. Since Visual Studio 2010 and continuing with Visual Studio 11 Developer Preview, Microsoft has invested heavily in better automation facilities using extensions. In fact much of the automation accomplished through the macros features can be accomplished with functionality in Visual Studio extensions.

    Here are some further resources that we recommend, when setting out to author an extension:

     http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/vstudio/ff718165

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/vstudio/ff677564

    Wednesday, September 28, 2011 6:00 PM
    Moderator
  • OK, cheer Matt. I've had to live without macros for a while now anyway since I switched to the Express Edition, but this is still pretty big news. It's not mentioned in the readme, and it definitely merits a post on the Visual Studio blog! That doc page also needs to be deleted...
    Thursday, September 29, 2011 1:21 PM
  • Here's an example of current usage of macros:

    http://stackoverflow.com/questions/931406/formatting-at-once-all-the-files-in-a-visual-studio-project

    Note this question has been viewed 849 times suggesting some interest

    Can you suggest an alternative solution to the stated problem that doesn't involve macros or will this have to be rewritten?

    Wednesday, October 05, 2011 3:51 PM
  • Hello from NYC,

    I guess this makes me part of the 1%!!!

    -J

    Tuesday, October 18, 2011 11:53 AM
  • Count me amongst the 1% who use Macros. 

    The feature I'll miss the most is Record and Playback.  I often use this feature for repetative mechanical operations that can't be accomplished with simple replace commands.

    I suspect (but have no data to back it up), that many people use the Record and Playback feature without appreciating that they are using a "macro".  Perhaps the 1% number represents those that write their own Visual Basic macros in the Macro explorer... While the percentage that use record and playback is much higher ??

     

    P.S.    

             While I am amongst the 1% that uses macros; I'm not among the 1% that the occupy-wallstreet protesters are calling out.

     

    Friday, October 21, 2011 3:47 PM
  • The feature I'll miss the most is Record and Playback.  I often use this feature for repetative mechanical operations that can't be accomplished with simple replace commands.

    Yep, that was my only use-case also. I'm not sure what the alternative is. The macro recording and playback didn't feel particularly powerful, but it was still quite useful.
    Monday, October 24, 2011 6:21 PM
  • Tuesday, October 25, 2011 5:23 PM
  • I'm part of that 1% as well.  The problem is that Microsoft has a lot of customers so even 1% is a large number of customers.  What irritates me is that I was OK with the existing piece of junk macro recorder in VS 2010.  At least it was available.  Now there's nothing.  I really don't care about having a language behind it... all I care about is a simple record-and-playback mechanism.  I think Microsoft tried to build something way too advanced instead of thinking of a simpler solution that would solve 90% of customers needs.
    Thursday, November 17, 2011 6:18 PM
  • Here's what Microsoft has suggested on Connect (at http://connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/details/697039/cannot-dump-document-keyboard-shortcuts-in-vs11)

     

    You can use DTE.Commands to get a list of a commands and then use the Bindings property to iterate through all the keybindings. Something similar to:

    foreach (Command command in dte.Commands)
    {
    if(((object[])command.Bindings).Length > 0)
    {
    foreach (object binding in (object[])command.Bindings)
    {

    You'll need to create either an Add-in or a VS Package (available in the VS SDK download). When writing it, the add-in/package will run in the Experimental Hive and you'll be able to test that it works.

    Thursday, January 12, 2012 12:58 PM
  • Here's my crude, but working solution, added to a new-project-wizard-generated C# add-in:

    public void Exec(string commandName, vsCommandExecOption executeOption, ref object varIn, ref object varOut, ref bool handled)
            {
                handled = false;
                SaveFileDialog dialog = new SaveFileDialog();
                dialog.Title = "Save keybindings to...";
                dialog.Filter = "TAB-delimited text files (*.txt)|*.txt";
                if (dialog.ShowDialog() == DialogResult.OK)
                {
                    StreamWriter f = File.CreateText(dialog.FileName);
                    f.Write("Command\tContext\tKey binding\n");
                    if (executeOption == vsCommandExecOption.vsCommandExecOptionDoDefault)
                    {
                        if (commandName == "DumpKeyboardShortcuts.Connect.DumpKeyboardShortcuts")
                        {
                            foreach (Command command in _applicationObject.Commands)
                            {
                                if (((object[])command.Bindings).Length > 0)
                                {
                                    foreach (object binding in (object[])command.Bindings)
                                    {
                                        f.Write(command.LocalizedName + "\t" + binding.ToString().Replace("::", "\t") + "\n");
                                    }
                                }
                            }
                           
                            f.Close();
                            handled = true;
                            return;
                        }
                    }
                }
            } 




    Thursday, January 12, 2012 2:49 PM
  • I am one of the 1% also. This is sad news! I use several macros with custom toolbars in my everyday development.

    On the other hand, I have found the performance of macros in 2010 to be a lot slower than 2003, so maybe I need to transition to extensions.

    Can you recommend a book on Visual Studio Extensions for a developer with experience using macros?

    Will Add-Ins be supported in Visual Studio 11? If yes, would it be easier to convert my existing macros to Add-Ins?

    Frank


    • Edited by OldGrouch Sunday, January 22, 2012 4:39 PM
    Sunday, January 22, 2012 1:28 AM
  • It seems to me that a number of the usages have to do with formatting source code.  Why not provide direct support for "formatting as part of file save", and "reformat all files in the project" ?  That would cover many users, as I see it, who have turned to macros because these are missing.  Thoughts?  Erik
    Friday, February 10, 2012 10:11 PM
  • I'm one of the 1% too. Apparently, there seem to be more than 1% (I'm pretty darn sure actually).

    So if a feature is not used, rather than educate your users on the use of the feature you remove it? That doesn't make sense. How bout a poll, before you take such as drastic step?

    The record/playback feature has been a real productivity feature. In fact I've been using this feature since Delphi 1 (The exact same keyboard shortcuts too) and then VS.NET. I've never used the macro editor etc. and have never cared nor seen a need for it. But the record/playback feature is priceless.

    I feel strongly that you guys need to re-think your decision or at least have it available as add-in (with a use at your own risk, disclaimer).


    http://www.matlus.com

    Tuesday, March 20, 2012 1:18 PM
  • +1. Macros were great.
    Wednesday, March 21, 2012 5:48 PM
  • This is a well reasoned point Matt and it seems fair but I have to put forward the idea that this 1% number comes from the automated usage reporting that people like me (super cool advanced users who use macros) find kinda gross and disable EVERY TIME. I got so sick of telling it no that I have an AutoHotkey program running that looks for annoying windows and answers them appropriately every quarter second or so. Among them are these opt in data usage reporters.

    I guess the joke's on me and the other super cool advanced users. We didn't realize that we were staying home from the election. I still don't know if I can bring myself to opt into these programs though. Man, I just realized that my "vote" here may be more likely to change my life than voting for the US President. Is that sad?

    I look forward to playing with extensions to see how that goes. Who knows, it might just blow macros away for what I want to do.

    • Proposed as answer by Tom Ince Thursday, November 15, 2012 12:03 PM
    • Unproposed as answer by Andrew McDonald Friday, November 16, 2012 2:04 AM
    Tuesday, April 03, 2012 2:33 PM
  • Well said Paul!

    http://www.matlus.com

    Tuesday, April 03, 2012 2:51 PM
  • I have also found record and playback of macros extremely useful. I also use it just to do the same text manipulations to a large number of rows. I hope the Visual Studio team brings that functionality back, maybe as a plugin.  This might be a simpler thing to support then the full macro record scenario.


    Tuesday, April 03, 2012 3:18 PM
  • I'm definitely in the 1% . . . as well as one of many who opt of automated usage reporting.  Little did I know I was giving up my vote on a very important feature!

    I've been making regular use of record/playback keystrokes way back to Programmer's Workbench days (i.e., Microsoft C Version 6).  This means that for 20+ years now Microsoft compiler products have supported some mechanism for record/playback keystrokes.  I find it amazing that in the year 2012 Microsoft now thinks it's a good idea to pull the plug on this "unused" feature.  If people aren't using this feature, they are either working too hard or don't know that such a feature exists.

    Today our office (a gaming studio) uses the more advanced Macros IDE to automate the following:

        1. Launching external Lua compiler (saving changes first), showing success or failure status of build, dumping errors (if any) to output, and allowing user to double-click on error output to pull up the Lua file name / line number in question.

        2. Capturing pseudo-breakpoints in our Lua code (i.e., user breakpoints set in Visual Studio, but VS doesn't understand) and passing this list to the Lua debugger.

        3. Smart/scripted search & replace operations, which incorporate usage of recorded keystrokes.

    Any idea how we would accomplish these things using Visual Studio 11?  By writing an extension?  And you think that we (your customers) have the time/money to do that?  It seems like a double-standard to mention cost as reason for not continuing macros yet, by not doing so, you transfer these costs to your customers.

    As a little customer feedback here, don't you think it would have been a good idea to have asked your customers to vote on this issue?  This is a pretty big deal and I can't help but feel that I'm being left "high and dry" by this unfortunate decision.

    Finally, as to the supposed "cost of continuing to maintain macros", I don't see why you simply don't just offer what you already have in Visual Studio 2010.  You don't even have to install that by default; it just has to be available.  Having only that level of support and security has worked fine for us for quite some time.

    I hope you will reconsider your decision to pull this important feature; I think more people are using it than your stats report.

    Thanks for listening,

    --Dave Novak

    • Edited by Dave_Novak Sunday, April 08, 2012 9:35 PM
    Sunday, April 08, 2012 9:31 PM
  • You should rethink about the “usage data”-thing. I’m exploring Visual Studio 11 since yesterday and miss the second feature that you stripped because of your “we know what you do from our usage statistics”.

    At first - Bring Back the Visual Studio Installation Customization Options:

    John Montgomery (Microsoft) “…only about 10% of customers chose to customize their installations…”

    http://visualstudio.uservoice.com/forums/121579-visual-studio/suggestions/2639283-bring-back-the-visual-studio-installation-customiz?page=2

    At second  - now I know that I’m also part of the 1% of the macro-users. I thought that the use of the Visual Studio 2008 MacroIDE in Visual Studio 2010 was a matter of time/resources. It was not clear (to me) that the use of macros is deprecated. 


    • Edited by a_zur Wednesday, April 11, 2012 10:20 AM
    Wednesday, April 11, 2012 8:21 AM
  • Extremely disappointed to hear this.

     

    Perhaps the most frustrating part is in the low utilization justification.

    VS Macros were always a bit clunky, barely working in 2005/2008. But with VS2010 most of the obvious bugs seem to be gone and they can prove very useful - if you can slug through the poorly documented api and VB restriction. And it's a surprise when no one uses them?

     

    In my mind, MS has the problem is reversed.

    Macro utilization would be drastically increased if the product was made better. Allow them to be written in C#, Document and Expand the API, enhance the recorder. Don’t eliminate a HUGE feature just because the current version falls short to the point that only the devoted can use it.

     




    • Edited by J. Zumwalt Wednesday, April 11, 2012 5:28 PM
    Wednesday, April 11, 2012 5:16 PM
  • I know I've already expressed my thoughts on the topic, but one question is still nagging at me: if Visual Studio extensions are the replacement for macro project and the Macros IDE, what then is the replacement for Record and Playback Keystrokes?  Yes, I realize that this too used macros behind the scenes, but my question is: can anyone actually author a Record and Playback Keystrokes Visual Studio Extension???  And, if so, it sure would be nice if Microsoft did this so we had something to truly replace the functionality they are taking away.  If such a thing is not possible through a Visual Studio Extension, I guess us "super cool advanced users" are just SOL and will be relegated to using Notepad++ (or any other reasonably advanced editor) in order to stay "super cool" by continuing to make use of record and playback keystrokes.

    Microsoft: don't hate me just because I'm in the 1%

    Also, be sure to cast your vote for this feature at Visual Studio User Voice here: http://visualstudio.uservoice.com/forums/121579-visual-studio/suggestions/2650757-bring-back-macros
    • Edited by Dave_Novak Friday, April 13, 2012 2:21 AM Added link to Visual Studio User Voice
    Friday, April 13, 2012 2:16 AM
  • All I can say to this... if your user metrics indicate only 1% of users ever need macros (including key stroke recording & replay!) there's a strong possibility your user metrics are wrong.  I think a previous poster had it right: Microsoft's user metrics systematically underrepresent power users because those are most likely to turn off the automatic feedback mechanism.
    Friday, April 20, 2012 9:36 AM
  • I can only comment on it one way... NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!

    Filip Skakun

    Friday, April 20, 2012 4:59 PM
  • That sucks. MS, some of us do have a substantial investment in macro development. 
    Sunday, May 06, 2012 10:30 PM
  • MS offers ease of programing, RAD tools on top of .NET stuff. There are 100 of classes, code automation tools (specifically for .NET buddies). Visual Studio is for sure the best IDE and debugger, and all that is for programmers flexibility.

    And now what? Removing one of the features, that aid in development? Why? From where MS has calculated that 1% ?

    There are many non-Internet connected developers using VS IDE inside office promises, or those who connected to net may have not participated in customer-experience-improvement program. These programmers would use macros frequently to do repetitive tasks.

    Why not ask the programmers itself before attempting to remove such nifty feature? If only 1% of VS users use macros, then I would say not more than 0.001% users of Office products would be using MACROS - remove it from there first. Why MS is attempting to make programmer's life miserable?

    Wednesday, May 09, 2012 3:52 PM
  • I'm just wondering - it's hard to believe that Microsoft would remove programmability of VS altogether because that would break all the tools, so maybe it's only the macros UI and language support that is being taken away. That gives opportunity for 3rd parties to add macros support - for example ReSharper might add macros support (such that would work well together with ReSharper - previously you had to disable Resharper to get the macros to work correctly - and that was done with a macro too!) or there might be some free extension. I'm only worried that recording macros with these tools might not work as well as it used to with the built-in macro recorder...

    Filip Skakun

    Wednesday, May 09, 2012 4:55 PM
  • Guess we'll have to make sure that StudioShell gets upgraded for VS11 http://studioshell.codeplex.com/
    Friday, May 11, 2012 1:50 AM
  • OK, this is enough. I can stand ugly user interface, I can stand horribly B&W icons, I can stand changes in project files making them incompatible with VS10, but I cannot live without macros. If MS want 1% less customers, drop macros. For me it is no macros - no upgrade.

    Đ.

    Sunday, May 13, 2012 12:52 PM
  • In Visual Studio 11, which I assume will cost, like VS 2010, about USD 12,000 in its top featured version, macro recording is not included? And on the other hand, I can record my keystrokes in free software like Notepad++?!

    If I would be a member of the VS dev team, I would feel ashamed about that.

    As a member of the 1% user group, I would really appreciate having macro recording in the IDE. Even a simple recorder without any editing features will do the job for me.

    Maybe MS will revise this decision. Or at least put an extension into the installation package, which is offering that functionality.


    Stefan


    • Edited by StevanR Wednesday, May 16, 2012 5:14 AM wrong numbering format
    Tuesday, May 15, 2012 9:26 PM
  • I must be part of the 1% also. I really doubt only 1% of users use macros. I wouldn't doubt that only 1% of users use the Macro IDE or save/load macros.

    Recording and playing back temporary macros is a necessary feature for any IDE. I don't care about the Macro IDE, or saving macros for future use. I NEED temporary macros to be more efficient.

    Let us assume for a minute that only 1% of users do actually use the Macros. That's more than enough in my book to keep the feature around. If 1% features keep being removed we're going to be left with a shell that compiles. Removing 1% features is something that Apple would do for their IPhone. An IDE is not a phone. We need control over the things we do. We need features that improve our productivity. We do not need features removed for the sake of simplicity.

    I will not be using VS2011 until I can use temporary macros.

    Thursday, May 17, 2012 3:05 PM
  • 99% of users must be part of 1% ...
    Sunday, May 20, 2012 6:44 AM
  • I think that Microsoft's statistical analysis methods is completely wrong and false. It does not represent what happens in the real world. I use macros ALL THE TIME and I know allot of other developers that use it. Heck, I even know Business Analysts that use it.
    Tuesday, May 22, 2012 5:17 AM
  • Where did you MS guys got that "1%" from? Apple?

    It has been about ten minutes after VS11 installation before I needed to record replay a little key sequence and I lost ten more minutes looking for the feature before my jaws falled on the ground confronted to the obvious: the macro recorder had been phased out.

    Putting record/play out of Visual Studio is an incredible mistake! Reminds me of I missed the fantastic C/C++ 7.0 PWB.EXE when I had to switch to the coarse code editor of Visual C++ 1.0 in Windows years ago.

    I've been using record/replay in code editors on a very regular basis since a lot of years, back to glorious BRIEF times for VERY USEFUL tedious tasks in lot of source files. I was perfectly happy in my old Visual Studio 6 when refactoring old code for instance, adding parameters to a family of functions ...

    Please get the macro recorder back !!! We actually used the Ctrl+Shift+R and Ctrl-Shift-P instant magic.

    I give you that ridiculous "ATL/MFC Trace Tool" should you need place in menus.

    Wednesday, May 23, 2012 2:07 PM
  • I can stand ugly user interface, I can stand horribly B&W icons, I can stand changes in project files making them incompatible with VS10, but I cannot live without macros.

    Đ.

    I second that one! We need our color icons back! Th B/W little icons all look the same, can't figure out which is which.
    Wednesday, May 23, 2012 2:11 PM
  • Don't you guys use your own product?

    Record and playback of keystrokes is one of those tools I need about once a week but when I need it I really, really appreciate it.  It is one of the features a programmer's editor has been expected to have since, what about 1975.

    This removal sucks.  Your stats tool clearly cannot help you distinguish between trivial and important features.  And the blather about it being "only in VB" is irrelevant.  Record and playback is the dominant use case, and on the rare occasions when I need to edit the macro I can figure out the semantics of a simple script.

    It is the functionality which is important, not your need to eliminate the last traces of VB.  You ripped out valued functionality.

    Wednesday, May 23, 2012 5:27 PM
  • This is unfortunate.  One of the big advantages MS has, is its excellent dev tools.  I guess I'll need to keep 2010 on my system. When you have 20k files in your project and you need to make a drastic interface change, macros really come in handy, and are much less error prone than sweeping code by hand.  

    I wouldn't be able to live without the recording, I use it at least once a week, sometimes, even, for mundane tasks that I could do by hand in a few minutes, but recording it allows me to do it in seconds (and again, less error prone).

    If I need to flip between VS10 and 11 constantly... I won't be very happy.

    The product I work on has VBA for its macros/recording/playback.  Our users use it a lot!  I understand how hard it is to maintain, every time you add a new feature, you must remember to also expose it via VBA.  When we add a new feature, we use a complex VBA macro (in VS) to generate most of the code needed to expose the new feature in VBA for our product (this can all be rewritten as an extension easily enough, I'm mostly concerned about the recording not working).


    Friday, May 25, 2012 1:56 PM
  • One does not simply remove macros from Visual Studio!

    now it seconds Notepad in not supporting Macros among all text editors.
    Friday, June 08, 2012 3:50 AM
  • My company has macros that insert file and function headers.  There is some code to determine filename, class, and function names but all is pretty basic.  What is the suggested method to capture this functionality in VS 2012?  Writing an extension seems like overkill but I lack experience to judge.

    Wednesday, June 13, 2012 6:59 AM
  • Writing an extension (or really, using an existing one) is definitely the suggested method. 

    At least StyleCop and Resharper have options for that, but presumably License Header Manager will be updated (and I suspect there are several others).

    Wednesday, June 13, 2012 2:46 PM
  • Does the Find/Replace Regex story get any better? It's non-standard pain in VS2010. If not, for mine, the record/playback needs to stay.
    Thursday, June 14, 2012 6:30 AM
  • It gets worse - the new Find/Replace mini-dialog supposedly has a regex option (hidden behind 2 of the 6 anonymous arrow icons), but I could not get it to work with regex groups (in VS2010 you can mark a group with curly braces and "\1\2\3..." tokens in the replace string are replaced with the respective groups).

    Filip Skakun

    Thursday, June 14, 2012 6:43 AM
  • It gets worse - the new Find/Replace mini-dialog supposedly has a regex option (hidden behind 2 of the 6 anonymous arrow icons), but I could not get it to work with regex groups (in VS2010 you can mark a group with curly braces and "\1\2\3..." tokens in the replace string are replaced with the respective groups).

    Filip Skakun


    Hello, groups are delimited with () in search string and referenced in replace string by $1, $2 etc.
    Thursday, June 14, 2012 10:17 AM
  • Quite to the contrary of what Filip wrote, it's incredibly better: find/replace is now using .Net Regular Expressions throughout. You have the full power of .net regex (with the ability to do brace matching, depth counting etc.)

    Of course this means that you no longer use {braces} but instead use (parenthesis) to delimit capturing groups, but it also means you can have named capture groups, look ahead, look behind etc.

    Thursday, June 14, 2012 3:34 PM
  • Thanks for the tip. That's great to know and I was suspecting that that could be the case and that regex queries were standardized in there. It's just that it is a breaking change for me and I did not know what the new conventions are and I will need to update my script library.

    Don't get me wrong - I like the idea of better screen space management and I think it's heading in the good direction. Still - the minified dialog suffers from some issues

    • the mentioned breaking change - even if for the better - is still a breaking change for me
    • it has the 6 arrow/triangle buttons that hide the old settings in seemingly random positions, so for example if I want to switch case sensitivity - I need to figure out which of them to click or remember the shortcut (Alt+C) and I still don't see which option is currently selected (tip - you can press down arrow to see it - see, it's good that I am complaining because it let's me do some research and learn)
    • the search scope dropdown does not show up when replace textbox is not shown
    • it does not remember the last searched string when you do a search and replace and then switch to another document to do the same

    Filip Skakun


    • Edited by Filip Skakun Thursday, June 14, 2012 8:49 PM added one more problem to the list
    Thursday, June 14, 2012 4:49 PM
  • There are some sample MS-supplied macros in Visual Studio 2010. One of the Macros is Macro to convert Macro to extension.

    I've successfully used it to convert my Macros to extensions.

    It is of course overkill to develop extensions. It is extremely inflexible. It is necessary to build it, install it, restart Visual Studio etc. Macros are such a nice convenience. VS API is quite ugly. Without record feature it'll take me 100 times longer to develop extension than macro.

    Before VS2012 I've heard rumors that C# will be allowed for macros (not a big concern for me, a VB developer, but somebody might be interested). And now this. Kill. Microsoft has a unique ability to kill their own products by management decisions that go against users - especially against the most valuable users - users trying to get maximum from MS products.


    Đ.

    Thursday, June 14, 2012 9:14 PM
  • Exactly - what's going on with Microsoft's mission to "help people and businesses throughout the world realize their full potential"? It does not seem like it's going so well on this thread. :)

    Filip Skakun

    Thursday, June 14, 2012 9:17 PM
  • I hope that everyone who has expressed remorse/displeasure about the removal of this feature has voted at Visual Studio User Voice here: http://visualstudio.uservoice.com/forums/121579-visual-studio/suggestions/2650757-bring-back-macros

    Not that MS listens to that voting any more than they do these comments, but it can't hurt I suppose.

    Thursday, June 14, 2012 9:29 PM
  • I have to admit I find changing the settings a bit frustrating (particularly when scope is set to "entire project" and I don't realize it).  And I'm annoyed with the way the search history works too.  I frequently end up hitting Ctrl+Shift+F or Ctrl+Shift+H to use the old fashioned dialog.
    Thursday, June 14, 2012 9:56 PM
  • Actually in new search you can also use named groups (<?Name>serach for this) and ${Name}. This is one of a few improvements in VS IDE.

    I'd appreciate having alternative big dialog for search.


    Đ.

    Thursday, June 14, 2012 10:07 PM
  • But you do have one, just hit Ctr+Shift+F
    Friday, June 15, 2012 4:44 AM
  • The main power of macros come with recording/playback for stuff that you need just now and probably never again. So writing an extension for these things is not the way to go. I have relied on macros to do major sweeps through large code base many times. And each time a different set of actions needed to be performed on a set of files. With macros I can achieve this in a couple minutes. With extensions... well... that would take a lot of time of writing and debugging.

    Also, the ability to run a macro when a breakpoint is hits is very useful. Just now I had a case when I was able to reproduce a very elusive bug. During saving a document an unhandled exception happened. I needed to resave the document again but our old UI menu handler was saying that the document is still being saved and could not be saved again. So, I needed to override the return value of one function to make sure it returns the number of active tasks to be zero.

    I couldn't close the application and rebuild or do anything else because chances are I wouldn't be able to recreate the document that exhibited the problem. I needed to override the return value of "GetTaskCount()" function that was something like that:

    int GetTaskCount()
    {
      int nCount = 0;
      for(auto p = tasks.begin(); p != tasks.end(); ++p)
      {
        if(some_condition(p))
           nCount++;
      }
      return nCount;
    }

    So, I put a breakpoint on the last line of the function (with "return nCount;"). and then specified "When Hit..." condition and set it to call my macro "ChangeVar()" and continue execution.

    In my VS macros I created this macro:

    Public Module Module1
        Sub ChangeVar()
            DTE.Debugger.ExecuteStatement("nCount=0")
        End Sub
    End Module

    And voila, I didn't have to restart the program. I was able to dynamically change the variable value (and I couldn't just break into debugger because that event handler is called on idle and every change focus notification). 

    I would not be able to do any of that if you take macros away... :(

    Thursday, June 21, 2012 6:49 PM
  • I absolutely agree!

    I totally disagree with removing macros. I also don't believe the mere 1% either. That may be the metrics that they're receiving, but I suspect that most "power users" (the very type of person likely to be using macros), like myself, have turned off the phones home feature.

    In addition to removing such a helpful feature as Macros, all this "new interface" stuff is supposed to bring VS in line with "Metro" guidelines. I find it ironic that Metro & Windows 8 are all great big blocks of color, but that we (developers) needed color removed from VS???

    These are two of the worst decisions that I've seen Microsoft make. But not just I don't like what they've done, I don't like that they tried to pass it off as "nobody was using it", and "you asked for it, we've given it to you". That has seriously eroded my trust in what Microsoft say, I'm afraid.


    Yann - LightSwitch Central - Click here for FREE Themes, Controls, Types and Commands
     
    If you find a reply helpful, please click "Vote as Helpful", if a reply answers your question, please click "Mark as Answer"
     
    By doing this you'll help people find answers faster.


    • Proposed as answer by Sebastian AveryBanned Saturday, December 08, 2012 11:46 AM
    • Unproposed as answer by Andrew McDonald Saturday, December 08, 2012 12:21 PM
    • Proposed as answer by Serg-V Monday, January 14, 2013 2:38 PM
    • Unproposed as answer by Andrew McDonald Monday, January 14, 2013 6:20 PM
    • Edited by Yann DuranMicrosoft community contributor Wednesday, January 16, 2013 1:07 AM Rearranged text to better address the question's topic foremost (I don't even know why I was off-topic to start with - sorry Andrew)
    Thursday, June 28, 2012 11:12 AM
  • WHAT THE !!!! How can you do that Microsoft ! I don't believe only 1% was using the Macros !

    I have 30 macros written by myself which I use almost everyday and many many people in my office do that !

    And you want us to write a freaking add in for every simple thing we want to do? Amazing.

    • Edited by Piyush Soni Thursday, June 28, 2012 5:54 PM whatever
    Thursday, June 28, 2012 5:53 PM
  • Just another vote from someone who loved this feature.  In fact it was one big advantage over Apple's XCode IDE and a reason to prefer dev on the MS platform.

    There are a lot of votes on this thread - how many required for it to be statistically significant?

    Btw, one great use for record/playback was as refactoring tool - whenever you needed some obscure refactoring you could sometimes fake it with search/cursor movements/editing in the macro.

    Saturday, July 07, 2012 6:29 PM
  • +1 for being in the 1%... I don't know what I'll do without the keyboard record/playback feature.  I've been using 11 RC thinking MS disabled the feature in the RC, not permanently!  I've been struggling along in my daily use awaiting the return of macros in the actual release... now I'm sad and confused... what will I do?  I'm here in fact because I'm stumped as to how to solve a text editing problem without it!  I guess since I keep around VS2008 in a VM to build our XP client (for a host of other reasons including significant executable size increases and compatibility in more recent versions), I suppose I could do my record/playback in that, but that sounds extremely inconvenient!  I swear every new release of VS is another challenge.  Should I install notepad++ for keyboard macros?  Or maybe Eclipse?  I'm not sure they'll satisfy the requirement but I guess I need to go investigate...
    Monday, August 13, 2012 1:37 PM
  • There is a selection bias or bug in the "usage data" reporting. Personally I have always turned off usage data reporting. Macros have been a staple in code editors since the 80's, and are still used by far more than 1%. Why else do all your competitors have it?

    check out VG.net: http://www.vgdotnet.com

    Monday, August 20, 2012 10:51 PM
  • Yep, one more here. I disable the statistics reporting feature, and don't use the record/playback macros feature, but have a small macro that removes trailing whitespace on every document save. We use git for source control, and this helps make whitespace squashing a non-concern. 

    Maybe what they meant to say was that 100% of macros users use it less than 1% of the time..? From everything I've been hearing about VS 11, you (MS) are supposed to be able to deliver things out-of-band without a full lifecycle release of the product. So bring this back. Please. And anyone here, please contribute 3 of your votes to this idea at the uservoice forum. They can't ignore that. 


    • Edited by Dan Ludwig Tuesday, August 21, 2012 7:40 PM
    Tuesday, August 21, 2012 7:39 PM
  • I'm belong to those 1 percent as well. sad to see the feature gone, remember that it was removed earlier as well in net version of VS, to reappear in more recent versions.

    Have there been any research on the kind of users that sends usage data? I myself send it, but know many friends and colleagues that never would send usage data.

    Please reevaluate the decision to remove it and se if you can add it as extension or update late.

    Monday, September 03, 2012 7:27 PM
  • 1% here too.. now I have to leave vs2012 to do annoying keystroke automation tasks.

    Boo.

    Wednesday, September 12, 2012 8:25 PM
  • Crappy UI and no Macro. If the statistics is the reason, expect Edit -> Advanced things going out sooner than you think.

    This is epic-fail, I really thought VS is worldclass IDE, not anymore.

    Wednesday, September 26, 2012 8:46 PM
  • I guess I'm stuck with VS2010 then, bummer, I was just starting to like 2012 but I use macro's wayy too much to go without.  My favorite macro switches between header and source files, no way I'm going to solution explorer every time.  My trial experience will influence whether the entire department upgrades.
    • Proposed as answer by Dave_Novak Thursday, September 27, 2012 1:20 PM
    • Unproposed as answer by Dave_Novak Thursday, September 27, 2012 1:20 PM
    Wednesday, September 26, 2012 9:26 PM
  • In the 'for what it's worth' category, there is some discussion of how one would go about converting Macros to Add-Ins, which are supported in VS-2012, over in this thread: http://visualstudio.uservoice.com/forums/121579-visual-studio/suggestions/2650757-bring-back-macros

    Hope that helps!

    Thursday, September 27, 2012 1:26 PM
  • Thanks Dave_Novak, I'll look into that.
    Tuesday, October 02, 2012 5:40 PM
  • Thank you Microsoft for taking 1% of my week figuring out why I couldn't find macros. Do the Microsoft Word guys charge too much for their work on the Macro feature?

    I guess I'll have to use Ultra Edit to process my VS files.

    Friday, October 12, 2012 11:17 PM
  • The feature I'll miss the most is Record and Playback.  I often use this feature for repetative mechanical operations that can't be accomplished with simple replace commands.

    Yep, that was my only use-case also. I'm not sure what the alternative is. The macro recording and playback didn't feel particularly powerful, but it was still quite useful.

    This is true for me as well. Macros are a most for any good editor.

    Monday, October 22, 2012 9:07 PM
  • I was just warming up to Visual Studio 11 when I discoved that my library of macros are now useless.  This is very disappointing!
    Friday, October 26, 2012 11:32 AM
  • I guess this 1%'ter will start having to record and playback his macros in Notepad++.

    Ian Oakes www.trillian.com.au

    Tuesday, October 30, 2012 11:00 AM
  • While we know that macros have been valuable for those who use them, unfortunately our usage data shows that less than 1% of Visual Studio developers take advantage of this feature.

    And all of them have replied to this thread :)

    Ian Oakes www.trillian.com.au

    Tuesday, October 30, 2012 11:02 AM
  • The new version of the Visual Studio 2012 development environment doesn't support creation of simple automation macros anymore. Microsoft was planning to abandon macros in their IDE long ago, having made the first attempt to do so in the early beta version of Visual Studio 2010, but they had to bring back the macros support in the final version under the pressure of the discontented users.

    Microsoft actually stopped developing the macros system in Visual Studio long ago, which becomes apparent once you open the embedded Macro IDE. Moreover, you still can create macros only in Visual Basic, while other .NET languages have never got any support. At the same time, according to the usage statistics, just a bit less than 1% of all the Visual Studio users regularly use macros (at least, if we can believe the statistics by Microsoft), while the disproportion between their usage and costs on supporting the backward compatibility of macros grows even bigger with each new IDE version. According to the MSVS developers on the official MSDN forums, Microsoft will start investing these resources into support of other, more full-fledged, automation methods and environment extensions available in Visual Studio, beginning with the Visual Studio 2012 version. These extensions, in particular, include the extension modules Add-In and Extension Package. These types of IDE extensions will allow programmers to interact with the development environment at a much deeper level compared to macros, while they will still be able to use the EnvDTE automation model which serves as a basis for all those Visual Studio macros. It means that the full functionality of these macros of yours will be available in extensions as well.

    Since Visual Studio extensions are in fact independent dll libraries, it may seem at first that using them instead of usually disposable macros is not practical. Actually, creating extensions of this kind is nowadays simple and transparent as never before, regardless of your previous experience of working with Visual Studio (this will be true, of course, if only we expect the complexity of these extensions' functionality to be comparable with that of macros). You can easily try to create your own extension starting with simple steps described in this article. This guide will allow you to create a completely functional managed extension module for all the Visual Studio versions literally within 10 minutes and start using your functional at once, while the rest articles of this series will help you find out the particular details.


    Andrey Karpov is technical manager of the OOO "Program Verification Systems" (Co Ltd) company developing the PVS-Studio tool which is a package of static code analyzers integrating into the Visual Studio development environment.

    Thursday, November 01, 2012 6:27 AM
  • Every time I update my service reference I need to use the macro so it uses common classes.  It seems like most people use macros for find and replace.  It would be great if you could save your find and replace.  Maybe 1 save would have multiple find and replaces for a file.  

    Adding something like this wouldn't be a great strain on VS.


    dan

    Friday, November 02, 2012 12:36 AM
  • I'm working around the missing temporary-macros issue by using the Visual Studio External-Tools feature to launch the currently open file in NotePad++ as follows:

    +++

    Title: &Notepad++

    Command: C:\Program Files (x86)\Notepad++\notepad++.exe

    Arguments: $(ItemPath)

    +++

    and then using the Notepad++ Macro Recorder.


    [o o]

    Sunday, November 04, 2012 1:38 AM
  • Cool, thanks. Make sure to vote for the bug here: https://connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/details/768683/macros-missing-now-getting-rsi-having-to-manually-alter-100-lines-of-code#tabs

    Filip Skakun

    Tuesday, November 06, 2012 6:54 PM
  • For find and replace I found this utility better than notepadd++ because you don't have to keep clicking ok on every replace

    http://www.ecobyte.com/replacetext/


    dan

    Thursday, November 15, 2012 10:03 PM
  • Cool, thanks. Make sure to vote for the bug here: https://connect.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/feedback/details/768683/macros-missing-now-getting-rsi-having-to-manually-alter-100-lines-of-code#tabs

    Filip Skakun

    I voted! And all posters in this thread should. But Microsoft said "Unfortunately, we have removed support for macros in Visual Studio 2012 and do not at this time have plans to support your scenario with macros. Please feel free to log a new suggestion on our UserVoice site or add your votes to an existing macros related suggestion".

    In the bug report another user posted this link:

    http://visualstudio.uservoice.com/forums/121579-visual-studio/suggestions/2650757-bring-back-macros

    so I registered to Uservoice, I voted and posted a comment! 

    Please, Microsoft, give us back macros. And please, allow us to write them in our .NET language of choice!

    Sunday, December 02, 2012 2:44 PM
  • I've installed the free open-source "Text Macros for Visual Studio 2012" Extension at:

    http://visualstudiogallery.msdn.microsoft.com/8e2103b6-87cf-4fef-9410-a580c434b602

    It doesn't create a macro that can be edited but it does allow Record/Play within the IDE.

    I'm happy enough now...


    [o o]

    Monday, December 03, 2012 9:37 AM
  • Sadly to know this, after transition from VS 08/10 projects, I am one of the poor 1%.

    But what is the equivalent of running a macro in "When hit..." breakpoint, I think it's rather hard to do than macros


    I am a passionate game programmer.

    Tuesday, December 04, 2012 5:05 AM
  • Sadly to know this, after transition from VS 08/10 projects, I am one of the poor 1%.


    Looks like this famous 1% is larger than Microsoft thinks...

    But what is the equivalent of running a macro in "When hit..." breakpoint, I think it's rather hard to do than macros

     

    Although it's a rarely used feature (and probably unknown to many) the "When hit" breakpoint can be a lifesaver in the right circumstances. But AFAIK there is no equivalent is VS 2012   :(

    Microsoft, if you can hear our voices, BRING BACK MACROS ! 



    • Edited by AlexanderVat Thursday, December 06, 2012 10:17 PM
    Thursday, December 06, 2012 9:40 PM
  • There is an add-in for Visual Studio which replaces missing macros functionality. Although it does not use VB but Lua scripting language, you might want to try it out. There is a recorder, macro code editor window with IntelliSense, and simple debugger.  The add-in also supports earlier VS, so if you prefer Lua language rather than VB, you can use it instead original VSMacros.

    http://www.softerg.com/vsscript

    Saturday, December 08, 2012 5:50 PM
  • Just can't believe you took out this handy feature! It was not even the time that macros used to save it was the fact the you could get rid of lot of tedious job in such a pleasant way

    To be honest I don't believe your statistics about 1%

    Wednesday, December 26, 2012 3:46 AM
  • I can't agree more with everyone voting to keep macros. I don't know if Quick Macros were a part of M$ computations, but I use it ALL the time. I want to add a div wrapper to a section of my forms across dozens of forms and being able to hit PLAY saves me incredible amount of time!
    • Edited by deltaearl Sunday, January 06, 2013 8:04 PM
    Sunday, January 06, 2013 8:03 PM
  • Add-ins and other types of extensions are way more complicated to develop than a macro. Especially for automating a one-off editing macro you will use for only a few minutes.

    check out VG.net: http://www.vgdotnet.com

    Thursday, January 10, 2013 10:43 PM
  • I too complained above and stuck with VS 2010 for a few weeks.  But guys...THE WORKAROUND IS NOT TOO BAD after all.

    As already suggested above, I'll re-suggest "Text Macros for Visual Studio 2012" (http://visualstudiogallery.msdn.microsoft.com/8e2103b6-87cf-4fef-9410-a580c434b602?SRC=VSIDE) ... however I recommend actually getting and building the source code for it, and then manually installing the extension yourself.  There is some functionality that we've been used to with the old macro recorder (for example, being able to search for text as one of the macro steps) that isn't implemented in the current version, but its easy enough to modify the code to make it work correctly.

    Cheers!

    Monday, January 14, 2013 8:03 PM
  • If this is such an underused feature, why are there 999 votes (is that a hard cap?  funny number) to bring that feature back?

    http://visualstudio.uservoice.com/forums/121579-visual-studio/suggestions/2650757-bring-back-macros?page=7&per_page=20

    Wednesday, January 16, 2013 3:03 AM
  • I am also in the 1%

    I have used VS since the late 90s and quick macros and a very fast editor were my top two VS text editor features meaning that I used it for pretty much all text editing, now with these two features gone, I have reverted to editing in vs6 and debugging in vs11

    If anyone knows of a vs6 text editor pluging for vs11 I would be very happy again.

    Friday, February 15, 2013 8:42 AM
  • There are not enough A's in the world to fill the ranks of Microsoft and like Bill said, once you hire B's they hire C's.  It is painfully obvious that this is the case.  

    Macros, while maybe only being used by 1% of the case study, are one of the mose effective RAD tools created.  I use them reguarly for any slightly repeditive task and abstracted more timely tasks to tool bar short cuts for the entire team.

    I will now be installing an older version of Visual Studio to have this functionality available.

    I assure you while you have taken efforts to please the masses you have hobled the most effective group of users.

    Thursday, February 21, 2013 5:40 PM
  • What you don't seem to get is that the macro facility actually represents an infinite number of feature additions -- sure some of them quirky, some of them niche, some of them only fit for the person that wrote them (some not even that) but regardless, AN INFINITE NUMBER OF FEATURES, custom fit to each of our likings!

    You're so selective about which features to keep or drop, so frugal and austere, but this move is PENNY WISE, POUND FOOLISH.  You have just ripped our ability to quickly, easily and painlessly extend VS UI right out from under us -- thanks for nothing!

    What you also don't get is that macro record was was the fast track to learning how EnvDTE works.  Historically the docs for this have been sketchy and poor, but it didn't matter, we were almost always only a recorded macro away from the set of building blocks we needed, or at the very least, a solid jumping-in point.

    And whoever offered AddIns as a substitute -- gah!  Pain in the AddIns more like, they take significant time to develop, the "manager" isn't one, loading/unloading is broken, you have to copy stupid files to stupid directories -- I'll bet you a BRIEF keyboard compatability AddIn that less than 1% of those that use macros, develop AddIns.

    It just occurred to me that your numbers come from those that consent to sending back usage data -- so what percentage of all users do they represent? Did it ever occur to you that those folks are most likely NOT accurately represetative of the developer community as a whole. They're probably mostly young ones who haven't been thrown under a bus enough times to deeply distrust Microsoft -- yet!

    I wish I could convincingly state that crap like this will be your downfall -- in a perfect world it would be.  Just like a wildfire growing so large it makes its wind is never a good thing, corporations that lead an industry by virtue of size alone... well, this change would be case in point.

    -Mark McGinty

    Tuesday, February 26, 2013 12:27 AM
  • I want to add my $.02 as well. I use the record playback feature at least several times a week. I was extremely disappointed when I started using VS2012 and found that it had been removed. I also turn off feedback, so it was likely not noticed by Microsoft that I was using it. Bad statistics lead to bad decisions. Of course, I'll admit that collecting good and valid statistics of what users are doing is not easy. I suspect many advanced users are turning off the usage reporting.
    Thursday, March 07, 2013 8:05 PM
  • If you don't mind using Lua scripting language instead of VB, you might want to check out this:

    http://www.softerg.com/vsscript

    This is a replacement for VS macros in the form of an add-in. It uses Lua scripting language (instead of VB), but most of Visual Studio API (DTE) is implemented.

    Major features are:

    Interactive macro recorder.

    Powerful scripting language based on Lua.

    Own Script Editor window in Visual Studio IDE, which can be docked or placed anywhere.

    Fully functional editor with dedicated Lua language support. Features include: syntax highlighting, IntelliSense, real-time syntax error detection, underlining wrong code lines, error messages displayed in tooltips, code outlining, automated block commenting/uncommenting, and more.

    Integrated script debugger. Features: stepping (into/over/out modes), running/stopping, breakpoints, call stack, multiple coroutines (thread of execution in Lua), displaying contents of variables, evaluating simple expressions.

    High performance.

    Language library for DTE bindings. That means you just use Lua to write VS macros using exactly same API as before.

    Thursday, March 14, 2013 4:15 PM
  • Every time... Ms ruins something with "improvements".

    every upgrade I ask myself if this is the time I just bite the bullet and switch to Linux.

    getting very close now...

    Wednesday, March 20, 2013 1:13 PM
  • Microsoft has lost it.  All of their decisions are towards dumbing down the UI or catering to the apparent 99% of dummies. 

    Monday, April 08, 2013 9:54 PM
  • FWIW, I had to downgrade to 2010 because of this (after paying for 2012 no less).

    Saturday, April 13, 2013 2:09 AM
  • This is ridiculous.  Microsoft has become the "ripping features out" company, while wasting time on useless and bizarre UI changes.

    I only had a few macros, but the idea of writing a compiled extension to replace a 5 to 10 line macro is just nuts.

    Overall, writing simple enhancements to one's environment is getting harder and harder.  Windows Themes are much harder to write than the old Control Panel Display applet (yep, I still use Windows Classic, not Aero), VS extensions are harder to write than macros.  Everything is being escalated to "needs a developer".  What next, removal of VBA from Microsoft Office?

    Maybe if Microsoft had replace VBA with PowerShell (?) or some "non-COM" macro replacement, or upgraded VBA to be able to link to .NET frameworks, I could understand.

    I'm a developer myself, but I don't always want to have to create a project / solution for some simple task.


    Wayne Erfling (aka Cornan The Iowan)

    Thursday, April 18, 2013 1:52 PM
  • I cannot belive that Microsoft has done this too (after having change all icons on VS, having removed the start button on Windows 8 and having replacing the entire Office interface !).

    Where is Bill Gates ?

    Once upon a time, Microsoft was listening to it's expert customers (those 1% that uses extra-features and know all shortcuts), knowing that those who are not now would follow and appreciate.

    At works, about 50 % of our Visual Studio users are not developers. They are testers and/or expert users and use VS to access Work Items and to code some dirty algorithm. Does Microsoft listen to them as much as it listen to us, real developers ?

    I'm really frustrated about those unpredictable move from Microsoft.


    Wednesday, April 24, 2013 2:53 PM
  • I cannot belive that Microsoft has done this too (after having change all icons on VS, having removed the start button on Windows 8 and having replacing the entire Office interface !).

    Where is Bill Gates ?

    Once upon a time, Microsoft was listening to it's expert customers (those 1% that uses extra-features and know all shortcuts), knowing that those who are not now would follow and appreciate.

    At works, about 50 % of our Visual Studio users are not developers. They are testers and/or expert users and use VS to access Work Items and to code some dirty algorithm. Does Microsoft listen to them as much as it listen to us, real developers ?

    I'm really frustrated about those unpredictable move from Microsoft.


    +1

    I definitively wonder whether it soft is made to work with or to please their marketing department

    • Edited by v4nv4n Friday, May 03, 2013 1:07 PM
    Friday, May 03, 2013 12:58 PM

  • I have been using VS 2012 for months, and was not aware this feature has been deprecated. Right now I have a task that is going to take many hours or perhaps even a few days without macros. I could have done it in less than an hour with macros.

    I use this feature less than once a year. When I need it, it's usually because it's going to save me a lot of work. That makes it very important to have it available, even though I hardly ever use it.

    It's a bit like having seat belts and airbags in your car. You don't expect ever to use it, but when you need it you certainly appreciate it's there. You can't just look at the usage count. There are other considerations.


    Bent Tranberg

    Monday, June 03, 2013 8:34 AM
  • And Microsoft didn't even document this? 

    Stunning!

    Absolutely stupid crap pulled by the big folks at Microsoft.

    Friday, July 05, 2013 5:06 PM
  • Yeah they need to add a "features and functionality removed" section to "what's new".  Leaving us to hunt in vain is adding insult to injury.
    Friday, July 05, 2013 6:11 PM
  • This is literally the biggest mistake Microsoft has taken towards professional developers since focusing 98% of their resources on .NET development.
    Wednesday, August 07, 2013 4:06 AM
  • I spent an hour looking through the menu bar, the options dialog and finally, the customize menus, looking for "view macro window", "show macro window", "macro recorder", anything... only to find this shaft from MS.  Insulting.
    Wednesday, August 07, 2013 4:08 AM
  • I really think there's a bug in your "data usage statistics" records...

    EVERYONE .net developer I know were using these macros.  Not in the "macro" menu, but with the quick record-play option to repeat tasks easily.

    Now, we're copying to notepad++, execute our macro, and get the code back to vstudio...


    Frederic

    Tuesday, September 03, 2013 7:43 PM
  • Oh... That is a big mistake ... I hope it would be rolled back! 

    Monday, September 16, 2013 9:38 PM
  • One more alternative is a new Visual Commander extension that can use existing Visual Studio macros code and supports new commands and extensions in C# or VB.


    Sergey Vlasov | Vlasov Studio | Visual Studio add-ins, extensions and tools


    Thursday, September 19, 2013 7:00 AM
  • +1. As seen by the many comments, users like myself do not constitute 1% of the users who need this macro functions. Because we deal with text editor, it's idiodic to remove this functionality. I use it daily like many others. What the hell were they thinking. BRING MACROS BACK. Like others, I'm sticking to using VS 2010 until this is brought back.

    </article><//article>
    Monday, September 23, 2013 4:51 PM
  • It seems to me that one of the main reasons that people didn't use Marco was because the functionality was not being kept up-to-date; some things were not possible to automate... such as some TFS dialogs.

    I really don't see how not keeping a feature current becomes a reason for droppping the feature.

    Thursday, October 24, 2013 2:56 PM
  • Macros are back:

    An open-source extension for Visual Studio 2012/2013: 

    visualstudiogallery.msdn.microsoft.com/8e2103b6-87cf-4fef-9410-a580c434b602

    Wednesday, January 15, 2014 11:49 PM
  • In this version of Visual Studio, while there are literally hundreds of features, there are some we’ve actually taken out...

    Every time I read something about Visual Studio 2012/2013, I get more and more disappointed. First the setup and deployment project and now macros.

    What's scares me, is that there may be more features they've taken out, and I will only find out when I upgrade...

     

    Tuesday, February 04, 2014 9:10 AM