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What does it take to get Brief emulation added back to VS 2010?

    General discussion

  • It's unbelievable that Brief emulation was removed from VS2010. This is a huge mistake. It was removed once from a previous version, and then re-appeared in the next version. One of the MSFT 'answer' comments was that "... because the IDE is now written completely in WPF, there wasn't time to include features used by less than 5% of VS users...". So, WPF is supposed to increase our productivity, but yet it became an impediment to the development of VS 2010 when adding editor emulators? For those of you at Microsoft, there are still people who can type over 100 WPM, who actually can, in many situations, type code faster than floundering around with "...point and click 'til you drop..." interfaces, and who actually write really serious code, particularly programs that help keep Windows OS relevant. What added feature to VS 2010 is more important than the functionality of a great text editor. Are we supposed to believe that text editing is a thing of the past as a signficant aspect of program development? You know, there are things behind Windows interfaces (like algorithms, etc.) that require a LOT of non-IDE enabled coding. Unbelievable... Brief has been around since the mid-1980's. It was THE editor of choice for power programmers when I was learning. Way to go MSFT. Let me know ASAP when I can expect Brief emulation back in the 2010 IDE...
    Saturday, July 31, 2010 1:52 PM

All replies

  • The hammer has met the nail squarely on the head with this commentary.  The lack of any hindsight is astounding.  A programming IDE not built for programmers, but at least the web PHD crowd will be able to copy and paste our work with relatively little effort.  Outstanding!  Now installing SlickEdit on Win 7 as we speak. 
    Sunday, August 08, 2010 6:11 AM
  • There is unfortunately no ETA for adding Brief emulation back into VS 2010 at this time.  It sounds like JackboyJr has seen the official response about this, but the main point is that we didn't have time to get everything working in the new editor.  If we do develop a VS 2010 extension for Brief emulation or reimplement this support in the next release of Visual Studio, I'll update this thread.

    Brittany Behrens | Program Manager | Visual Studio Platform - Editor | The Visual Studio Blog | @VSEditor on Twitter

    Monday, August 09, 2010 11:20 PM
  • Now that the EMACS extension is out, can we expect an Brief extension soon?
    Wednesday, September 29, 2010 5:52 PM
  • @mmcgrego:  No.  We're not working on a Brief emulation extension and don't currently plan to create one.  We understand the criticisms of considering usage numbers in decision-making, but even among the relatively small percentage of VS customers who use emulations, the Emacs user base dwarfs the Brief user base.  Again, I truly wish we could include everything that was available in previous versions, but unfortunately it's not always possible.

    Brittany Behrens | Program Manager | Visual Studio Platform - Editor | The Visual Studio Blog | @VSEditor on Twitter

    Wednesday, September 29, 2010 8:02 PM
  • Brittany - No Brief emulation???  WTF!!!  Count me among those who grew up on Brief and is EXTREMELY ANGRY at you guys for pulling the rug out from under it with VS 2010.  I'm so mad I want to fly to Redmond and scream.

    Friday, November 12, 2010 6:01 PM
  • When you looked at the usage numbers, how do you know how many of your users are seasoned, productive engineers that have been around the block a while.  That's the group, among whom there would be a higher percentage of Brief emulation users, who have been disenfranchised by this decision making.

     

    Until Microsoft feels that developers such as myself are important, I'll have to edit in VS2008 and use VS2010 to build, which means that many of the new features included in the move to WPF are of little or no value to me.

    Monday, November 15, 2010 11:08 PM
  • The usage numbers are "low" because so many (younger) programmers have only grown up with mouse-driven systems and have no idea how productive a properly designed keyboard editor can be. This clearly applies to Microsoft's designers and developers too. Unfortunately this seems to be the way it will be - most people I know don't even consider thinking that an editor could be better - they just accept whatever is thrown at them. So long as it's got lots of useless things popping up in their face and it's in different colours they think it's great.

    I grew up with Brief and STILL consider it BY FAR the best text editor ever produced. Visual Studio - in spite of it's claim to "Brief emulation" has never come close to offering the productivity that Brief did. One thing I miss EVERY day is the ability to have multiple "windows" containing different files. I still sometimes type "if" then a space and wonder why the editor hasn't put brackets after the space as Brief would do for you.

    I was considering trialling VS2010 until I saw this post - I don't think I'll bother now. We have a copy of VS2005 in the office which I sometimes "have" to use, but the Brief "emulation" in this is shocking - in particular doing a find leaves the selection on when you move the cursor meaning you have to hit 4 other keys to get rid of it (alt-L to turn it on cos it thinks it's off and then alt-L to actually turn it off).

    I could go on and on about the deficiencies in Microsoft's development of text editors (and frequently do in the office, much to the dismay of my colleagues) - it seems to me there is no consideration of how keyboard editing can be improved, much to the detriment of the population as a whole.
    Friday, November 26, 2010 2:24 PM
  • Brittany,

    I was hoping that there might have been some positive progress to reconsider the addtion of BRIEF emulation to VS2010 editor. I regret that sometimes blogger comments are perceived be to hostile or irrate, but you surely understand that end-users like consistency and minimal changes unless they are truly improvements; and that any changes should be for the better. Long time programmers sometimes become irritated with the 'constant' programming paradigm changes that Microsoft imposes on programmers. And yet, we seem to persevere and modify code (that has become legacy code) because of 'improvements'. Win32, COM, DCOM, COM+, Remote, Win32API, MFC, ATL, C-->C++->unmanaged-->managed, 'this' is deprecated, "...we no longer support java...", "...we now support java...", umpteen database interface syntaxes and data models, and there are plenty more examples.

    And yet, the one thing that always has remained virtually constant was the text editor if you used BRIEF, before Visual C, to Visual Studio, to VS add-ins like CodeWright, to VS direct emulation. In otherwords, being able to use the same text editor over the last 25+ years has made it easier to swallow a new programming model that pops up every 6-months or so. And, I'm not complaining about the various newer coding methods, but only to make the point that having the utility of the same text editor through all these changes was a wonderful thing. I am wondering if you are even the slightest bit familiar with BRIEF, and realize that writing certain types of code where you don't have to take your hands off the keyboard (to use a mouse) is very effective and productive. Even the Windows user interface can be manipulated without a mouse (painful yes, but it can be).

    But, here I drone on, and this is not the primary point I want to make.  I know that in VS2010, from the menu bar Tools->Options->Environment->keyboard, one can re-define keys/key combinations. However, in order to emulate BRIEF, you need to be able to toggle the highlight on and off. Without wanting to make things complicated, I think there are about 12 or 15 'editor' key sequences or combos that, if provided in VS2010 as a 'BRIEF' choice or feature, you guys could satisfy 99% of the BRIEF users and make these people VERY happy. These include ALT-C (then cursor keys, home/end, or pagup/dn keys), ALT-M (then cursor keys), ALT-L (then cursor up/dn, pgup/dn), ALT-D, ALT-X, ALT-U, home-home-home, end-end-end, numeric-+, numeric-'-', numeric-insert.  If any of the other readers can think of any more of the MOST important BRIEF key/key combos desired, by all means respond.  For example, I can live WITHOUT BRIEF macro emulation. Again, I want to emphasize that BRIEF was optimized for the true touch-typists out there. I just want to figure out how you guys at Microsoft can make this happen. It seems to me that even if only 5% of users like BRIEF, isn't that still like one million people or something worldwide. That's still a LOT of people.

    Thanks again for the opportunity to plead our case. Surely, it isn't that difficult to accomplish is it?

     

    Wednesday, December 22, 2010 3:49 PM
  • Can we get an update on if/when we might see the return of Brief? At a recent programmer meeting in Waterloo the anger over the loss of Brief was fairly impressive. At the same time I didn't hear a single person say "Oh but having the IDE re-written in WPF sure does make up for the loss of it!”  I am really surprised that MS has chosen to abandon its long term core users for the sake of adding some additional bells and whistles to the IDE.  Not only dropping the feature but making the editor unable to re-assign keys specific to Brief just seems to add salt to the wound.  Having to work in VS2008 and then compile in VS2010 is a major pain in the ____.  The canned responses from MS are also not helping the situation, there is certainly no shortage of requests for Brief to be put back in VS2010 (Google it).  We simply want to know when VS2010 will be the equal of VS2008.


    Thursday, December 23, 2010 9:35 PM
  • Yeah, I agree with JackboyJr - he's precisely right in his assessment of which Brief functionality is required (certainly for satisfying my requirements).

    Surely making this concession to helping out us Brief-emulation users wouldn't cost Microsoft that much.

    Thursday, January 06, 2011 11:00 AM
  • Count me in. I have no plans to move to VS2010 until Brief emulation is back. Alternatively, why can't MS add .NET4 support to VS2008 which does at least have some form of Brief emulation.

    I did try to get used to life without Brief keystrokes but it's so much slower and you continually have to reach for the mouse. What a pain!

    Saturday, January 15, 2011 4:00 PM
  • I would just like to add my protest to those of others who are protesting this withdrawal of features in VS2010. Very irritating. Bring back Brief emulation.
    Monday, January 17, 2011 3:58 PM
  • Another vote to add Brief emulation to VS 2010! I feel like I'm programming in Notepad!
    Tuesday, January 18, 2011 10:23 PM
  • I guess we can see from Microsoft's silence on this issue (No responses since Sept 2010) that they really don't give a damn about the more mature coders using VS2010. This really is a shame since likely we were the ones that pushed for adoption of the MS toolkit stack in our departments over the years, and the thanks we get is the eradication of the very way we use these tools. Just to add further insult, we are told that our editor was dropped because they had to focus on prettying up the rest of the IDE and didn't have time for such things as solid text entry.
    Monday, January 24, 2011 6:23 AM
  • I have been using Brief since the "MS-DOS days" when there was no mouse attached to the computer.  Brief was great.  Along came Visual Studio 6 and had Brief Emulation, although there were some problems with it.  Most annoying was block select Alt+C,Cursor Key.  In VS6.0, you have to do Alt+C,Esc,Cursor Key.  Some block functions did not work properly as well.  It was workable though.

    Along came Visual Studio 2003, 2005, 2008 which had diminishing Brief Emulation.  I would keep VS6 installed and used it for any heavy keyboard editing.

    Visual Studio 2010 is now here, but Brief Emulation is MIA.  I am finally forced to learn a new system.  In search of a solution (or workaround),  I decided if I could find equivalent keystrokes for VS, I could conform.

    Here are somewhat equivalent VS2010 keys for Brief Emulation.  What made Brief so productive is that the most common functions (Cut, Copy, Past, Undo) are single keystrokes (and well placed keys).

     Function                  Brief-Keys                VS2010-Keys             
     Cursor Control           
         Begin of Line            Home  Home,Home              
         End of Line              End                       End                    
         Top of File              Ctrl+Home or Home,Home    Ctrl+Home              
         End of File              Ctrl+End                  Ctrl+End               
     Selection                
         Block Select             Alt+C,CursorKeys  Alt+Shift+CursorKeys   
         Mark Lines               Alt+M,CursorKeys          Shift+CursorKeys       
         Insert/Overwrite Mode    Alt+i                     Ins                    
     Clipboard                
         Cut  (to clipboard)      - (Number Pad)            Shift+Del  or  Ctrl+X
         Copy (to clipboard)      + (Number Pad)            Ctrl+Ins  or   Ctrl+C
         Paste (from clipboard)   Ins Shift+Ins   or   Ctrl+Y
         Undo                     * (Number Pad)            Ctrl+Z     or   Alt+Backspace
         Redo                     Ctr+U                     Ctrl+Y                 
     Search / Replace         
         Find in File             Alt+S                     Ctrl+F                 
         Find Next Occurrance     Shift+F5  F3                     
         Replace String           Alt+T                     Ctrl+H                 
         Goto Line #              Alt+G                     Ctrl+G                 
     Delete                   
         Kill Line                Alt+D                     Ctrl+Del               
         Kill to Line End         Alt+K                     Alt+Shift+End,Del      
     File                     
         Save File                Alt+W                     Ctrl+Shift+S           
     Macros   
         Define Macro             F7                       Ctrl+Shift+R
         Play Macro               F8                       Ctrl+Shift+P
    Brief Block Functins
        Indent Lines Alt+C,CurDn,Tab  
        Deindent Lines Alt+C,CurDn Ctrl+Shift+P
       Insert in all Lines Alt+C,CurDn, Type Chars Ctrl+Shift+P

    In the original Brief editor, you could mark a block, and do a search/replace within that block.  This is one that was very useful at times, but dont know an equivalent.

    http://www.lugaru.com/brikeys.html
    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms165488(v=vs.90).aspx
    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/da5kh0wa.aspx#designerseditorsshared

     

    Monday, January 24, 2011 11:00 PM
  • Unfortunately, this means that Visual Studio 2010 is going to greatly reduce my productivity.  That's a real shame for a product that is supposed to be an "upgrade".

    Other programmers in our group would watch me editing using the BRIEF keyboard emulation and marvel at how quickly I could perform tasks that were extremely difficult using the Visual Studio editing commands.  Now I will have to undertake any serious editing in an editor outside of the IDE.

    I suppose that makes it a Disintegrated Development Environment.


    Bill Roper
    Monday, April 18, 2011 9:49 PM
  • Coder_Dan posted a macro in a separate thread that I modified into the three macros below. They do most of the cut/copy/paste functionality of brief and VS2010 lets you bind these to numpad+, numpad-, and insert keys. I'm still working on these to get them further along, but they have been working well for me for a few weeks now.

     

        Sub BriefCut()

            Dim selection As EnvDTE.TextSelection

            Dim xpos As Integer

            selection = DTE.ActiveWindow.Selection()

            If (selection.IsEmpty) Then

                xpos = selection.ActivePoint.VirtualCharOffset

                selection.SelectLine()

                selection.Cut()

                selection.MoveToLineAndOffset(selection.ActivePoint.Line, xpos)

            Else

                selection.Cut()

            End If

        End Sub

     

        Sub BriefCopy()

            Dim selection As EnvDTE.TextSelection

            Dim xpos As Integer

            selection = DTE.ActiveWindow.Selection()

            If (selection.IsEmpty) Then

                xpos = selection.ActivePoint.VirtualCharOffset

                selection.SelectLine()

                selection.Copy()

                selection.MoveToLineAndOffset(selection.ActivePoint.Line - 1, xpos)

            Else

                selection.Copy()

            End If

        End Sub

     

        Sub BriefPaste()

            Dim selection As EnvDTE.TextSelection

            selection = DTE.ActiveWindow.Selection()

            selection.Paste()

     

            Dim text As String

            If (System.Windows.Forms.Clipboard.ContainsText()) Then

                text = System.Windows.Forms.Clipboard.GetText()

            End If

        End Sub

    Wednesday, April 20, 2011 12:44 AM
  • Add me to the list. There are two developers in my group who have used Brief for years. I agree with everyone here that I can be much more productive with Brief than with standard Windows editors. Switching between the keyboard and mouse is such a waste of time.

    Please work on an extension for Brief.

     

    Friday, July 22, 2011 2:28 AM
  • Well, this is almost comical. I decided to search to see if Brief emulation was ever going to be supported properly in VS. Having just switched on one PC to VS2010, I decided it was time to give another look. Oh my. I will undoubtedly continue to alt-tab from Codewright until the end of time.  The times I have checked VS Brief emulation it has been pretty sketchy with a few showstoppers that made me never bother to try force myself to adjust.

    And that's really what this is about, being forced. Being forced to trade productivity for irritability.  Of course it's a dwindling 5% that want Brief emulation. When you don't support something that number of your users isn't going to increase.  After nearly 2 decades of being ignored that you still have 5% is amazing.  What was the original number that wanted it?

    Putting it another way, 10% of the population is left handed. If VS somehow did not support left handers 20 years ago, how many lefties would be using it today? And the ones that did use it, what would their attitude be towards it?  How many would switch when the opportunity arose, even to a completely different platform?

    When put in such a light, the official response of not having time seems flippant or a poor joke.

    Here's something else. I'm very proud to be among the "Brief" users. Not because of any brand loyalty but because it tells me something about the person.  It generally tells me that this is another seasoned power programmer who will get the job done -- faster, stronger, better. I know this from working with several who still refuse to switch; who started in their teens and aren't retiring soon.

    On the whole, I have little doubt that the code produced by this 5% is far better than the other 95%. You'd think MSFT would want this group on their side generating good apps.

     

     

     

     

     

    Tuesday, August 30, 2011 10:52 AM
  •  Without wanting to make things complicated, I think there are about 12 or 15 'editor' key sequences or combos that, if provided in VS2010 as a 'BRIEF' choice or feature, you guys could satisfy 99% of the BRIEF users and make these people VERY happy. These include ALT-C (then cursor keys, home/end, or pagup/dn keys), ALT-M (then cursor keys), ALT-L (then cursor up/dn, pgup/dn), ALT-D, ALT-X, ALT-U, home-home-home, end-end-end, numeric-+, numeric-'-', numeric-insert.  If any of the other readers can think of any more of the MOST important BRIEF key/key combos desired, by all means respond.  For example, I can live WITHOUT BRIEF macro emulation. Again, I want to emphasize that BRIEF was optimized for the true touch-typists out there. I just want to figure out how you guys at Microsoft can make this happen. It seems to me that even if only 5% of users like BRIEF, isn't that still like one million people or something worldwide. That's still a LOT of people.

    Thanks again for the opportunity to plead our case. Surely, it isn't that difficult to accomplish is it?

     

    This section from JackboyJr's comments is GOLD!!!  If we could just get the most-used keystrokes emulated, and he's definitely hit my favorites, then we can avoid touching that mouse thingy just to perform EXTREMELY COMMON editing functions.  I understand that emulating all the capabilities of Brief is more than the MS team is willing to tackle but just get us the basics.  Please.  If there were a Brief user, just one, on the MS editor team, this wouldn't even be an issue.  Also, this is not a resistance to change or refusal to do something "new". This is about real, seasoned developers understanding tool efficiency and what works best for them.  I also understand this is purely a business case from microsoft's perspective but how much effort is REALLY involved here?

     

    Tuesday, August 30, 2011 6:16 PM
  • One more resounding request for Brief emulation!!!!!!
    Monday, September 12, 2011 5:40 PM
  • So Brittany,

    How's the WPF thing working out for ya? Check out this link. Rumor? Speculation? Typical Microsoft? What does this statement mean? "... WPF ended up as a bodge job...." (see quote below)

    http://www.zdnet.com/blog/microsoft/microsofts-windows-server-8-taking-the-cloud-to-the-operating-system/10643

    An excerpt from the above link (in the 'Talk Back' section towards the bottom of the page)...

    RE: Microsoft's Windows Server 8: Taking the cloud to the operating system
    @rbethell
    .Net Will use Jupiter. Microsoft are not getting rid of .Net. Jupiter is a replacement for WPF, Windows Forms if you're still using them and if it lives up to its promise and is fast enough may replace some DirectX use in C++. WPF ended up as a bodge job. I've got a middle range desk top. Put 40 WPF Polygon objects on the screen in debug mode and it grinds to a halt. I haven't tried leveraging WPFs graphics capabilities on a tablet, but the result must be pathetic. WPFs problem was that it ended up grafted on top of Win 32. Jupiter is what what WPF was meant to be.
    ZDNet Gravatar
    RichStrat
    about 3 days ago
    So, does that mean BRIEF emulation is back in for VS 2012? You must say yes, yes, yes!!!
    Thanks. Jack
    Saturday, September 17, 2011 10:04 PM
  • I would like to also add my disdain to the lack of BRIEF emulation. BRIEF ROCKS when it comes to productive coding - nothing else comes close. I would also like to know where these statistics come from that claims such a small percentage of developers use BRIEF. I find it really hard to believe. BRIEF was the first serious editor for the PC, it lasted a long time, was purchased by Borland (hmm, I wonder if that has anything to do with Microsoft's decision - nah) and MUST have been used by most of the really seasoned developers. The current VS keystroke layout SUCKS compared to BRIEF. Microsoft, get over yourself and quit telling us what we want, ESPECIALLY when it comes to something as critical as keyboard productivity - a programmers bread andbutter derives from the keyboard; it should be taken VERY seriously.
    Saturday, October 08, 2011 2:06 AM
  • Nice job, Jackboy!  I agree with absolutely everything you've said here -- and that goes for everyone else that posted, except for Brittany (who, it occurs to me, is done listening to our case.)

    I'm afraid I can't quite buy into the "we didn't have time", or "WPF made it too difficult" excuses; clearly the actual reason is that they simply didn't want to.  They've surely had time to add it by now, but they haven't because: they don't want to. 

    I sort of doubt they ever truly wanted to implement true BRIEF compatibility, IIRC it was first introduced in VS4 -- probably because there were still a number of people still actually using BRIEF + MultiScope, and/or Symantec C++ (which had respectable BRIEF emulation.)  VS1 and VS2 sucked (I don't recall using VS3) but VS4 was decent.. my guess is they added BRIEF to it then, to make using it more compelling to all the hold-outs.

    As has been noted, if they had ever truly gotten BRIEF right, it would likely have gained users over time, rather than lost, but they didn't, BRIEF mode has degraded with each successive release of VS, to the point that its advantage is difficult to perceive, to those that have never used the original BRIEF.   And now it would seem MSFT has finally pulled this thorn from it's side.

    But enough history... have any of you considered collaberating to make this happen?  Like an open Source Forge project or something?  It would likely be a fairly large undertaking, but divided amongst some number of talented programmers, perhaps do-able?

     

    -MM

    Sunday, October 23, 2011 2:15 PM
  • Just playing around with macros I came up with a passible BRIEF selection/cut/paste work-alike. (Alt-C, Alt-L, Alt-D, NUM+, NUM-, INS) Unfortunately, to make it fly I had to remap the arrow up/down/left/right to macro functions, which noticeably degraded keystroke performance, plus it side-affected intellitype, and broke the arrows in the immediate window.

    So for now I had to give up on Alt-C and Alt-L, I'd rather just use Alt-Shift to select columns, mapping the arrow keys to macros is unlivable. I downloaded the VS2010 SDK, perhaps an AddIn would allow me to process the arrow keys without noticeably impacting the user experience, but in the interim [which may last forever] this will do.

    I also implemented HOME and END -- almost perfectly. The first time HOME is pressed the cursor goes to start of line, and the third time it goes to start of document, but I haven't figured out how to tell which line is the first one visible. Similarly, the first and third time END is pressed it works just like BRIEF did, but that pesky second press, which of course depends on knowing what part of the document is visible, is likewise broken. If I can find a way around this imperfection I'll be pretty happy with what I have. (If I can create an AddIn that makes Alt-C/Alt-L practical too, I'll be ecstatic.)

    Long story short, though it isn't complete BRIEF emulation, at least I've gotten some of the productivity back, that was lost to this "business decision."

    I'll post the macro code here after I've tested it a little more thoroughly.

    -MM

    Monday, October 31, 2011 10:36 AM
  • I converted my macro set to an AddIn, and it works quite nicely -- even ALT-C/ALT-L, no noticible performance issues whatsoever!  I have made the project available here.

    Enjoy!

    -MM

    Friday, March 02, 2012 11:15 AM
  • Thanks Mark, while this is far from pererct, its sufficient for most of what I do. Thanks for saving my programming life (what's left of it...)

    --Qolin 

    Monday, June 18, 2012 8:25 AM
  • BTW the link in Mark's post above seems to be wrong, I found it all at http://depracatethis.blogspot.co.uk/2012/04/visual-studio-brief-keyboard-emulation.html

    --Qolin

    Monday, June 18, 2012 8:27 AM
  • Thanks Mark, while this is far from pererct, its sufficient for most of what I do. Thanks for saving my programming life (what's left of it...)

    --Qolin 

    I agree it's quite a ways off perfect.  The most critical flaw is that it screws with movement keys in non-text windows.  I thought the problem might be that it created a commandbar (under the tools menu) with accelerators but I removed that... still no love.  Removing the commandbar did change behavior, when it was present the functions assigned to the shortcut keys executed in the last text window you were using.  Now they don't but they still don't work in non-text editor windows.

    For my money this is a VS2010 bug, limiting the scope of keyboard shortcuts to a particulat type of VS window clearly doesn't work right, and the behavior I've observed rather defies my concept of "ActiveDocument" but be that as it may, this problem threatens the workability of my code... the WYSIWYG HTML editior and the immediate window, for examples, are both a bummer without the arrow keys.

    The other glaring issue would be that HOME HOME or END END movements can be inadvertently invoked, I notice it when I need to paste something to the end of several different-length lines (down, end, paste [repeat])  Pressing any other key should interrupt that sequence.  (Since I don't trap all keys, pressing any other BRIEF key will have to suffice.) 

    I just made that change to the code on my bench, but this problem is so minor compared to the first one... I'll try to get the change up to my blog in the next few days...

    All in all it has become something of a disappointment to me. I wish I could find an example of a .vsk project for VS2010, or a project template, or even any docs about it.  I wish I knew specifically why brief.vsk from older versions loads in VS2010 but doesn't function?  TextDocumentKeyPressEvents looked promising but it only fires for key strokes that will change the text... useless for this... [sigh]

    Oh well, thanks for the note.

    -MM


    Wednesday, June 20, 2012 7:01 AM