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Converting VB6 apps to VB2010

    Question

  • I'm trying out VB2010 before I buy it. I have a number of applications that have been written in VB6. So far i have found no way to load them into VB2010 and convert them. Is this possible??? A few of these apps are to large to re-write so what do I need to do???

     

    TIA Rick

    Tuesday, August 24, 2010 4:02 AM

Answers

  • Use the express edition of VB2008 to help convert to VB.NET.  Even less painful; use the Interop Forms Toolkit.  Ask on the "Visual Basic Interop and Upgrade" forum.  Read some of the posts on that forum for guidance.
    • Marked as answer by Liliane Teng Monday, August 30, 2010 9:30 AM
    Tuesday, August 24, 2010 6:44 AM
  • Hi,

    VB6 and VB.net are totally different languages, and MS have never officially endorsed a automatic migration route for anything beyond simple applications. The migration path is non-trivial. There are several companies around that offer migration services, I haven't tried them but my advice would be manage it yourself.

    There are some good third-party alternatives to the built-in migration wizard: Artinsoft's and VBMigration.com.

    • Marked as answer by Liliane Teng Monday, August 30, 2010 9:30 AM
    Tuesday, August 24, 2010 5:48 AM
  • Be aware that beside some disapointed VB6 users who wanted to keep there COM experience, which Microsoft has changed 10 years ago for NET, the language changes between version VB4 and VB6 were much more then between those are between VB6 and VB10. 

    Since version Visual Studio 2010 is the translation tool from VB6 to VB10 not anymore in the IDE.

    But when you scroll up look straight forward to the top of the screen you see probably the tab Visual Basic 6.0.

    That is to give for instance for users like you the path for translating.

    Be aware that VB10 is not simply anymore only a program language for Windows Forms, it is currently also full for Web and will be full for Phone and whatever there maybe.  Web is ASP.Net and Silverligth, Desktop is Windows Forms and WPF.

    Also working with Databases is not anymore done for a in practise maximum of about 50 users but for 50.000 users.

     


    Success
    Cor
    • Marked as answer by Liliane Teng Monday, August 30, 2010 9:48 AM
    Tuesday, August 24, 2010 7:07 AM

All replies

  • Hi,

    VB6 and VB.net are totally different languages, and MS have never officially endorsed a automatic migration route for anything beyond simple applications. The migration path is non-trivial. There are several companies around that offer migration services, I haven't tried them but my advice would be manage it yourself.

    There are some good third-party alternatives to the built-in migration wizard: Artinsoft's and VBMigration.com.

    • Marked as answer by Liliane Teng Monday, August 30, 2010 9:30 AM
    Tuesday, August 24, 2010 5:48 AM
  • Use the express edition of VB2008 to help convert to VB.NET.  Even less painful; use the Interop Forms Toolkit.  Ask on the "Visual Basic Interop and Upgrade" forum.  Read some of the posts on that forum for guidance.
    • Marked as answer by Liliane Teng Monday, August 30, 2010 9:30 AM
    Tuesday, August 24, 2010 6:44 AM
  • Be aware that beside some disapointed VB6 users who wanted to keep there COM experience, which Microsoft has changed 10 years ago for NET, the language changes between version VB4 and VB6 were much more then between those are between VB6 and VB10. 

    Since version Visual Studio 2010 is the translation tool from VB6 to VB10 not anymore in the IDE.

    But when you scroll up look straight forward to the top of the screen you see probably the tab Visual Basic 6.0.

    That is to give for instance for users like you the path for translating.

    Be aware that VB10 is not simply anymore only a program language for Windows Forms, it is currently also full for Web and will be full for Phone and whatever there maybe.  Web is ASP.Net and Silverligth, Desktop is Windows Forms and WPF.

    Also working with Databases is not anymore done for a in practise maximum of about 50 users but for 50.000 users.

     


    Success
    Cor
    • Marked as answer by Liliane Teng Monday, August 30, 2010 9:48 AM
    Tuesday, August 24, 2010 7:07 AM
  • Question is, why do you want to update?

    As everyone has suggested they are different languages all be it with the same syntax.

    You never know the large VB application might become a small VB.NET application.

    …we each have more potential than we might ever presume to guess.
    Tuesday, August 24, 2010 3:59 PM
  • Question is, why do you want to update?

    As everyone has suggested they are different languages all be it with the same syntax.

    You never know the large VB application might become a small VB.NET application.

    …we each have more potential than we might ever presume to guess.

    All? That is exactly what I try to deny, that fable should be removed. 

    The VB program language is only more extended, but the languages description version 6 is almost completely still in language description VB10.

    The way of using classes is extremely changed, but that is the same with all Net languages and a VB6 user has than in fact an advantage because he know at least the program language. (Not all the classes, but those I don't also not know all).


    Success
    Cor
    Tuesday, August 24, 2010 6:21 PM
  • As everyone has suggested they are different languages all be it with the same syntax.

    If they have the same syntax, they are the same language.  VB programmers seem to have a problem of confusing runtime library with language - for instance in most C derived languages, including C#, there are no built in function at all, everything is a library call.   The VB language is the set of keywords and the built in functions, that make up it's core syntax.  For the most part, that is exactly the same as VB6 - only extended.  There are of course exceptions, some things removed or renamed, but syntactically VB6 and VB.NET are probably 80 - 90% the same.

    Where they differ the most, is in the underlying object library and platform.


    Tom Shelton
    Tuesday, August 24, 2010 6:57 PM
  • No worries Cor, I'll rephrase ....

    I, and I alone, suggest VB and VB.NET are two different languages; all be it with similar syntax.

    I'll extend that by adding that from my own, and only my own, experience I can tell instantly whether someone with VB background has coded in VB.NET; it looks wrong.

     

    Sorry, I stated that everyone suggested something, when it wasn't true.

     


    …we each have more potential than we might ever presume to guess.
    Tuesday, August 24, 2010 7:05 PM