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HOW TO consume WCF Service in ASP.Net using Visual Studio 2008 - Cannot find Endpoint.

    Question

  • Dear Friends:

     

    I am trying to consume a WCF Service in an ASP.Net web application.   When I try and execute within the ASP.Net client the constructor “ServiceClient client = new ServiceClient();” to construct the proxy created by the svcutil.exe, I get this error message:

     

    InvalidOperationException was unhandled by user code

    Could not find default endpoint element that references contract ‘IService’ in the ServiceModel client configuration section.  This might be because no configuration file was found for your application or because no endpoint element matching this contract could be found in the client element.

     

    I am just starting with WCF in VS 2008.   Years ago, I did try WCF when it was yet called Indigo, but those I worked for were not prepared to use Microsoft’s beta releases.   So now I am attempting once again to start using WCF now that it is a released product.   The tutorials out on the Internet usually discuss creating a simple WCF service and then consuming it within a Console Program which is not what I want.   Basically, I am use to creating Web Services for ASP.Net applications but now I would like to step up and start consuming WCF services.  

    There are right now only two books available concerning WCF using VS 2008.   There is a big reference book, Programming WCF Services by Juval Lowy but it has no tutorials.   Michelle Bustamante is great in here WCF book “Learning WCF”, but I haven’t been able to find and order her newest release through O’Reilly covering VS 2008, but only older additions covering VS 2005.   So right now, I and likely a lot of other developers are in need of some pointed guidance specifically consuming WCF Services with ASP.Net applications using VS 2008.

     

    My thought is that I will describe here what I am doing, and maybe then someone who knows will point out what is missing.   The result will be that then when others search the Internet, they will get a complete answer to help them as well once they read the threads that will result from this issue.   I am getting this above error in an ASP.Net web application which is as basic as “Hello World”, but in this case we could call it “Hello WCF”.   Here is what I am doing so far:

     

    (1)     Create “HelloWCF” client web application:

    a.       In VS 2008, click File, New, and then Web Site.

    b.       Within “New Web Site” dialog, select the template “ASP.Net Web Site”, and name your web application “HelloWCF”.   Click the OK button to create the web application.

    c.       When the “Default.aspx” page for then new web application appears, click the “Design” button at the bottom of the page.  When the Design view displays, drag and drop an ASP Button from the Toolbox to “Default.aspx” page.  Save the entire project.

    d.       Display the “Solution Explorer.”, right-click the “HelloWCF” project, and click the “New Folder” option.  Rename the newly created “NewFolder1” to App_Code”.

    (2)     Create “MyWCFService” web site:

    a.       With the “Solution Explorer” for the “HelloWCF” client application displayed, once again click File, Add, and then New Web Site.

    b.       When the “Add New Web Site” dialog displays, select “WCF Service” template, and name your WCF service “WCFService”.  Click the OK button to create the WCF service.

     

    (3)     Create “proxy” and add it to the “HelloWCF” client web application:

    a.       Right-click the “App_Code” folder within the “HelloWCF” client web application, and click the Add Existing Item … option.

    b.       When the Add Existing Item dialog displays, navigate to the App_Code folder within the client application, select the “proxyWCFService.cs” class, and click the Add button.

    c.       Right-click the “WCFService” project within the “Solution Explorer”, and select the “Set as Startup Project”.   Click F5 to start and run the WCF Service.   When the “Debugging Not Enabled” dialog displays, click the OK button to modify the Web.config file.

    d.       When the Service Service page displays, you will see a line of code that if exercised will create “proxy” class for the “HelloWCF” client program.  That line of code will look something like this:

    svcutil.exe http://localhost:1554/WCFService/Service.svc?wsdl

    Select and copy this line of code to the ClipBoard.

    e.       You now want to create a batch file that will on demand create or re-create that “proxy” class.  From the Start button, click the Run.. button,  and enter the word “notepad” as the program to open.  Click the OK button to start Notepad.   Click the Edit button within Notepad, and select Paste.  When the line of code to create the “proxy” class displays within Notepad, modify as follows so that it will create a “proxy” class with an appropriate name such as “proxyWCFService”:

    svcutil.exe http://localhost:1554/WCFService/Service.svc?wsdl /out:proxyWCFService.cs

    f.         Within Notepad, click the File, and Save options.   When the Save As dialog displays, navigate to the App_Code folder within the “HelloWCF” client web application.   Change the “File Name” to “MakeProxyClass.bat”, and then click the OK button save the batch file.

    g.       Now click File, and Exit within Notepad to exit Notepad.

    h.       Start Windows Explorer, and then navigate to the App_Code folder with the “HelloWCF” client web application.   Copy “svcutil.exe” to the App_Code folder.   With this utility within the App_Code folder,  now double click the “MakeProxyClass.bat” file to create the “proxyWCFService.cs” class within the App_Code folder.
    Exit Windows Explorer.

    i.         Returning to VS 2008, click Debug and then select “Stop Debugging” to stop the running “WCFService”.

     

    (4)     Add Service Reference to “HelloWCF” client web application:

    a.       Right-click the “HelloWCF” project within the “Solution Explorer” and select the Set as Startup Project option.

    b.       Again right-click the “HelloWCF” project within the “Solution Explorer”, but this time select the Add Service Reference… option.

    c.       When the “Add Service Reference” dialog displays, enter into the Address text box the name of the WCF service, which in this example is “http://localhost:1554/WCFService/Service.svc”.   Now, when you type in your address, the port number will be of course unique to your development environment.

    d.        Click the GO button.   When the “Service” displays within the Services list box, click the OK button to add the ServiceReference1 Namespace as a reference.  Adding this Service Reference will properly modify the client’s “web.config” file to include HttpBinding, and to define the endpoint for the WCF Service such as follows:


        <system.serviceModel>

            <bindings>

                <wsHttpBinding>

                    <binding name="WSHttpBinding_IService" closeTimeout="00:01:00"

                        openTimeout="00:01:00" receiveTimeout="00:10:00" sendTimeout="00:01:00"

                        bypassProxyOnLocal="false" transactionFlow="false" hostNameComparisonMode="StrongWildcard"

                        maxBufferPoolSize="524288" maxReceivedMessageSize="65536"

                        messageEncoding="Text" textEncoding="utf-8" useDefaultWebProxy="true"

                        allowCookies="false">

                        <readerQuotas maxDepth="32" maxStringContentLength="8192" maxArrayLength="16384"

                            maxBytesPerRead="4096" maxNameTableCharCount="16384" />

                        <reliableSession ordered="true" inactivityTimeout="00:10:00"

                            enabled="false" />

                        <security mode="Message">

                            <transport clientCredentialType="Windows" proxyCredentialType="None"

                                realm="" />

                            <message clientCredentialType="Windows" negotiateServiceCredential="true"

                                algorithmSuite="Default" establishSecurityContext="true" />

                        </security>

                    </binding>

                </wsHttpBinding>

            </bindings>

            <client>

                <endpoint address="http://localhost:1554/WCFService/Service.svc"

                    binding="wsHttpBinding" bindingConfiguration="WSHttpBinding_IService"

                    contract="ServiceReference1.IService" name="WSHttpBinding_IService">

                    <identity>

                        <dns value="localhost" />

                    </identity>

                </endpoint>

            </client>

        </system.serviceModel>

     

    (5)     Within “HelloWCF” client web application, and add “ServiceModel” constructor:

    a.       Click the “Default.aspx” tab within VS 2008.

    b.       Double click the “Button” to create the code block for click event.   Add a “using” statement for the “ServiceModel” namespace, and a constructor within the Button click even for the ServiceClient, whch should look like this.

    using System.Data;

    using System.Linq;

    using System.Web;

    using System.Web.Security;

    using System.Web.UI;

    using System.Web.UI.HtmlControls;

    using System.Web.UI.WebControls;

    using System.Web.UI.WebControls.WebParts;

    using System.Xml.Linq;

    using System.ServiceModel;                      //Added to the application.

     

    public partial class _Default : System.Web.UI.Page

    {

        protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)

        {

     

        }

        protected void Button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)

        {

            ServiceClient client = new ServiceClient();

    //Constructor added to Button1 code block

        }

    }

    c.       From File, click Save All for the solution.   Now click F5 to run “HellowWCF” web application.   When the “Debugging Not Enabled” dialog displays, click the OK button to modify the web application’s Web.Config file.

    d.       When the Default.aspx page displays within the Browser, click the Button to cause the “proxy” constructor to be called.

     

    (6)     Run “HelloWCF” client web application and get “Endpoint” failure.   So what have I missed?

    a.       When you click the Button when the web application is running, the application exceptions out as described earlier.

     

    InvalidOperationException was unhandled by user code

    Could not find default endpoint element that references contract ‘IService’ in the ServiceModel client configuration section.  This might be because no configuration file was found for your application or because no endpoint element matching this contract could be found in the client element.

     

    b.       This is where I require your guidance.   First of all, I find the error message itself misleading because if you even try to add a “configuration file” within Add New Item for a web application, there is no “Configuration File” template.   Secondly, the “endpoint” the error message complains can not be found is clearly visible within the Web.Config file as I displayed at the end of step 4 of these instructions.   Basically, none of the code within the WCF Service was altered at all.   The names of the service and interface were left exactly as Service and IService as VS 2008 created them.   Thus, I would appreciate your guidance in determining how to satisfy this exception and fix the web application so that it can successfully create the constructor for the “proxyWCFService.cs” class.

    I look forward to your suggestions to this issue.

     

    Sincerely,

     

     

    Burton G. Wilkins, .Net Developer.

     


    .Net Developer
    Monday, March 16, 2009 3:21 AM

Answers

  •  

    Dear Randall Tombaugh:

     

    Thank you for your answer, which of course worked.   The devil is of course always in the details.  In this case my reliance on the “svcutil.exe” program came out of having knowledge of earlier releases of WCF, which I simply assumed had to be used.   There was no explanation clear as you have made it that actually in many ways the use of “svcutil.exe” for web development may be a bit obsolete having now its processes thoroughly integrated in VS 2008.

     

    Having embraced you solution, I have amended my description below of how to create the simplest of web applications “HelloWCF” and begin using a WCF Service:

     

    (1)     Create “HelloWCF” client web application:

    a.       In VS 2008, click File, New, and then Web Site.

    b.       Within “New Web Site” dialog, select the template “ASP.Net Web Site”, and name your web application “HelloWCF”.   Click the OK button to create the web application.

    c.       When the “Default.aspx” page for then new web application appears, click the “Design” button at the bottom of the page.  When the Design view displays, drag and drop an ASP Button from the Toolbox to “Default.aspx” page.  Save the entire project.

    (2)     Create “MyWCFService” web site:

    a.       With the “Solution Explorer” for the “HelloWCF” client application displayed, once again click File, Add, and then New Web Site.

    b.       When the “Add New Web Site” dialog displays, select “WCF Service” template, and name your WCF service “WCFService”.  Click the OK button to create the WCF service.

     

    (3)     Create “proxy” and add it to the “HelloWCF” client web application:

    a.       Right-click the “App_Code” folder within the “HelloWCF” client web application, and click the Add Existing Item … option.

    b.       When the Add Existing Item dialog displays, navigate to the App_Code folder within the client application, select the “proxyWCFService.cs” class, and click the Add button.

    c.       Right-click the “WCFService” project within the “Solution Explorer”, and select the “Set as Startup Project”.   Click F5 to start and run the WCF Service.   When the “Debugging Not Enabled” dialog displays, click the OK button to modify the Web.config file.

    d.       When the Service Service page displays, you will see a line of code that if exercised will create “proxy” class for the “HelloWCF” client program.  That line of code will look something like this:

    svcutil.exe http://localhost:1554/WCFService/Service.svc?wsdl

    Select and copy this line of code to the ClipBoard this portion of that code line:

           http://localhost:1554/WCFService/Service.svc

     

    (4)     Add Service Reference to “HelloWCF” client web application:

    a.       Right-click the “HelloWCF” project within the “Solution Explorer” and select the Set as Startup Project option.

    b.       Again right-click the “HelloWCF” project within the “Solution Explorer”, but this time select the Add Service Reference… option.

    c.       When the “Add Service Reference” dialog displays, enter into the Address text box the name of the WCF service, which in this example is “http://localhost:1554/WCFService/Service.svc.   Now, when you type in your address, the port number will be of course unique to your development environment.

    d.       Note that at the bottom of this dialog there is a Namespace text, which presently has the default “ServiceReference1” within it.   Change this to something more descriptive.   Since the name of the WCF service is “WCFService”, in this case we will simply change this namespace to “WCFService”.   This namespace will later on be used within the client web application to associate references to the WCF service with this reference.

    e.       Click the GO button.   When the “Service” displays within the Services list box, click the OK button to add the WCFService Namespace as a reference.  Adding this Service Reference will properly modify the client’s “web.config” file to include HttpBinding, and to define the endpoint for the WCF Service such as follows:

    <system.serviceModel>

       <bindings>

       <wsHttpBinding>

        <binding name="WSHttpBinding_IService" closeTimeout="00:01:00"

         openTimeout="00:01:00" receiveTimeout="00:10:00" sendTimeout="00:01:00"

         bypassProxyOnLocal="false" transactionFlow="false" hostNameComparisonMode="StrongWildcard"

         maxBufferPoolSize="524288" maxReceivedMessageSize="65536" messageEncoding="Text"

         textEncoding="utf-8" useDefaultWebProxy="true" allowCookies="false">

         <readerQuotas maxDepth="32" maxStringContentLength="8192" maxArrayLength="16384"

          maxBytesPerRead="4096" maxNameTableCharCount="16384" />

         <reliableSession ordered="true" inactivityTimeout="00:10:00"

          enabled="false" />

         <security mode="Message">

          <transport clientCredentialType="Windows" proxyCredentialType="None"

           realm="" />

          <message clientCredentialType="Windows" negotiateServiceCredential="true"

           algorithmSuite="Default" establishSecurityContext="true" />

         </security>

        </binding>

       </wsHttpBinding>

      </bindings>

      <client>

       <endpoint address="http://localhost:1995/WCFService/Service.svc"

        binding="wsHttpBinding" bindingConfiguration="WSHttpBinding_IService"

        contract="WebService.IService" name="WSHttpBinding_IService">

        <identity>

         <dns value="localhost" />

        </identity>

       </endpoint>

      </client>

    </system.serviceModel>

     

    The good news is that as you modify your WCF service during development, you need only right click on App_WebReferences now within your client solution and click “Update Web/Services References” to update your “web.config” file to reflect any changes made.

     

    (5)     Within “HelloWCF” client web application, and add “ServiceModel” constructor:

    a.       Click the “Default.aspx” tab within VS 2008.

    b.       Double click the “Button” to create the code block for click event.   Add a “using” statement for the “WCFService” namespace you specified when creating the Add Service Reference, and a constructor within the Button click even for the ServiceClient, whch should look like this.

    using System.Data;

    using System.Linq;

    using System.Web;

    using System.Web.Security;

    using System.Web.UI;

    using System.Web.UI.HtmlControls;

    using System.Web.UI.WebControls;

    using System.Web.UI.WebControls.WebParts;

    using System.Xml.Linq;

    using System.WCFService;                      //Referencing WCF Service.

     

    public partial class _Default : System.Web.UI.Page

    {

        protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)

        {

     

        }

        protected void Button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)

        {

            ServiceClient client = new ServiceClient();

    //Constructor of “WCFService” namespace added to Button1 code block

        }

    }

    c.       From File, click Save All for the solution.   Now click F5 to run “HelloWCF” web application.   When the “Debugging Not Enabled” dialog displays, click the OK button to modify the web application’s Web.Config file.

     

    (6)     Run “HelloWCF” client web application to access the “WCFService”.   

    a.       Set a breakpoint on the “ServiceCleint” constructor.

    b.       When the Default.aspx page displays within the Browser, click the Button to cause the “proxy” constructor to be called.

    c.       The HelloWCF” client web application will stop on the constructor.

    d.       Click F11 to single step through the constructor “ServiceClient client = new ServiceClient();

    e.       You have succeeded to call the constructor of your WCF Service and could now add further logic to reference methods with it.  

    f.         Click F5 to allow the web client to continue.

     

    From this point on, any programmer should be able to add additional methods, change the name of the service, and look forward to the eventual deployment of there WCF Service.   Thank you for your guidance.

     

    Sincerely,

     

     

    Burton G. Wilkins, .Net Developer.

     


    .Net Developer
    • Marked as answer by Burt Wilkins Tuesday, March 17, 2009 9:40 PM
    Tuesday, March 17, 2009 9:40 PM

All replies

  • Hi Burt,

    First, thanks for providing such a complete description of your issue--it really made it easier to understand what you are doing.

    The problem you have actually stems from your client proxy generation.  You are actually generating the client proxy twice.  Using svcutil is one way, and adding a service reference is the other way.  Both create your ServiceClient code and a config file.  You are actually using the code produced by svcutil, but the config produced by adding a service reference.  Using either way will work, but mixing the two ways leads to the exception you are seeing (which I was able to reproduce).

    If you want to continue to use svcutil to generate your client proxy, be aware that svutil will generate both a .cs file and an output.config file.  You'll need to merge the <system.serviceModel> settings from the output.config file into the asp.net's web.config file.  Of course, there is no easy way to automate this web.config file merge.

    When you add a service reference like you did, it not only modifies the web.config, but also generates your client proxy code (although the code doesn't end up in the app_code directory but is under the App_WebReferences directory).  When you added the service reference, you were asked to provide the namespace.  The client proxy code exists in this namespace.  I set the namespace to WCFservice, so my client code looks like the code below.  Notice the "using WCFservice".  Also, its important to note that there is nothing in my ASP.NET app_code folder.  The nice thing about using the "add service reference" mthod is that you can right-click on the service reference at select "update" to update the proxy client code after you change your WCF service.

    1 using System;  
    2 using System.Collections.Generic;  
    3 using System.Linq;  
    4 using System.Web;  
    5 using System.Web.UI;  
    6 using System.Web.UI.WebControls;  
    7 using System.ServiceModel;  
    8 using System.Runtime.Serialization;  
    9 using WCFservice;  
    10  
    11 public partial class _Default : System.Web.UI.Page   
    12 {  
    13     protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)  
    14     {  
    15  
    16     }  
    17     protected void Button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)  
    18     {  
    19         ServiceClient client = new ServiceClient();  
    20         Button1.Text = client.GetData(5);  
    21     }  
    22
     
    Hope this helps.

    ~Randall
    Tuesday, March 17, 2009 12:42 AM
    Moderator
  •  

    Dear Randall Tombaugh:

     

    Thank you for your answer, which of course worked.   The devil is of course always in the details.  In this case my reliance on the “svcutil.exe” program came out of having knowledge of earlier releases of WCF, which I simply assumed had to be used.   There was no explanation clear as you have made it that actually in many ways the use of “svcutil.exe” for web development may be a bit obsolete having now its processes thoroughly integrated in VS 2008.

     

    Having embraced you solution, I have amended my description below of how to create the simplest of web applications “HelloWCF” and begin using a WCF Service:

     

    (1)     Create “HelloWCF” client web application:

    a.       In VS 2008, click File, New, and then Web Site.

    b.       Within “New Web Site” dialog, select the template “ASP.Net Web Site”, and name your web application “HelloWCF”.   Click the OK button to create the web application.

    c.       When the “Default.aspx” page for then new web application appears, click the “Design” button at the bottom of the page.  When the Design view displays, drag and drop an ASP Button from the Toolbox to “Default.aspx” page.  Save the entire project.

    (2)     Create “MyWCFService” web site:

    a.       With the “Solution Explorer” for the “HelloWCF” client application displayed, once again click File, Add, and then New Web Site.

    b.       When the “Add New Web Site” dialog displays, select “WCF Service” template, and name your WCF service “WCFService”.  Click the OK button to create the WCF service.

     

    (3)     Create “proxy” and add it to the “HelloWCF” client web application:

    a.       Right-click the “App_Code” folder within the “HelloWCF” client web application, and click the Add Existing Item … option.

    b.       When the Add Existing Item dialog displays, navigate to the App_Code folder within the client application, select the “proxyWCFService.cs” class, and click the Add button.

    c.       Right-click the “WCFService” project within the “Solution Explorer”, and select the “Set as Startup Project”.   Click F5 to start and run the WCF Service.   When the “Debugging Not Enabled” dialog displays, click the OK button to modify the Web.config file.

    d.       When the Service Service page displays, you will see a line of code that if exercised will create “proxy” class for the “HelloWCF” client program.  That line of code will look something like this:

    svcutil.exe http://localhost:1554/WCFService/Service.svc?wsdl

    Select and copy this line of code to the ClipBoard this portion of that code line:

           http://localhost:1554/WCFService/Service.svc

     

    (4)     Add Service Reference to “HelloWCF” client web application:

    a.       Right-click the “HelloWCF” project within the “Solution Explorer” and select the Set as Startup Project option.

    b.       Again right-click the “HelloWCF” project within the “Solution Explorer”, but this time select the Add Service Reference… option.

    c.       When the “Add Service Reference” dialog displays, enter into the Address text box the name of the WCF service, which in this example is “http://localhost:1554/WCFService/Service.svc.   Now, when you type in your address, the port number will be of course unique to your development environment.

    d.       Note that at the bottom of this dialog there is a Namespace text, which presently has the default “ServiceReference1” within it.   Change this to something more descriptive.   Since the name of the WCF service is “WCFService”, in this case we will simply change this namespace to “WCFService”.   This namespace will later on be used within the client web application to associate references to the WCF service with this reference.

    e.       Click the GO button.   When the “Service” displays within the Services list box, click the OK button to add the WCFService Namespace as a reference.  Adding this Service Reference will properly modify the client’s “web.config” file to include HttpBinding, and to define the endpoint for the WCF Service such as follows:

    <system.serviceModel>

       <bindings>

       <wsHttpBinding>

        <binding name="WSHttpBinding_IService" closeTimeout="00:01:00"

         openTimeout="00:01:00" receiveTimeout="00:10:00" sendTimeout="00:01:00"

         bypassProxyOnLocal="false" transactionFlow="false" hostNameComparisonMode="StrongWildcard"

         maxBufferPoolSize="524288" maxReceivedMessageSize="65536" messageEncoding="Text"

         textEncoding="utf-8" useDefaultWebProxy="true" allowCookies="false">

         <readerQuotas maxDepth="32" maxStringContentLength="8192" maxArrayLength="16384"

          maxBytesPerRead="4096" maxNameTableCharCount="16384" />

         <reliableSession ordered="true" inactivityTimeout="00:10:00"

          enabled="false" />

         <security mode="Message">

          <transport clientCredentialType="Windows" proxyCredentialType="None"

           realm="" />

          <message clientCredentialType="Windows" negotiateServiceCredential="true"

           algorithmSuite="Default" establishSecurityContext="true" />

         </security>

        </binding>

       </wsHttpBinding>

      </bindings>

      <client>

       <endpoint address="http://localhost:1995/WCFService/Service.svc"

        binding="wsHttpBinding" bindingConfiguration="WSHttpBinding_IService"

        contract="WebService.IService" name="WSHttpBinding_IService">

        <identity>

         <dns value="localhost" />

        </identity>

       </endpoint>

      </client>

    </system.serviceModel>

     

    The good news is that as you modify your WCF service during development, you need only right click on App_WebReferences now within your client solution and click “Update Web/Services References” to update your “web.config” file to reflect any changes made.

     

    (5)     Within “HelloWCF” client web application, and add “ServiceModel” constructor:

    a.       Click the “Default.aspx” tab within VS 2008.

    b.       Double click the “Button” to create the code block for click event.   Add a “using” statement for the “WCFService” namespace you specified when creating the Add Service Reference, and a constructor within the Button click even for the ServiceClient, whch should look like this.

    using System.Data;

    using System.Linq;

    using System.Web;

    using System.Web.Security;

    using System.Web.UI;

    using System.Web.UI.HtmlControls;

    using System.Web.UI.WebControls;

    using System.Web.UI.WebControls.WebParts;

    using System.Xml.Linq;

    using System.WCFService;                      //Referencing WCF Service.

     

    public partial class _Default : System.Web.UI.Page

    {

        protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)

        {

     

        }

        protected void Button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)

        {

            ServiceClient client = new ServiceClient();

    //Constructor of “WCFService” namespace added to Button1 code block

        }

    }

    c.       From File, click Save All for the solution.   Now click F5 to run “HelloWCF” web application.   When the “Debugging Not Enabled” dialog displays, click the OK button to modify the web application’s Web.Config file.

     

    (6)     Run “HelloWCF” client web application to access the “WCFService”.   

    a.       Set a breakpoint on the “ServiceCleint” constructor.

    b.       When the Default.aspx page displays within the Browser, click the Button to cause the “proxy” constructor to be called.

    c.       The HelloWCF” client web application will stop on the constructor.

    d.       Click F11 to single step through the constructor “ServiceClient client = new ServiceClient();

    e.       You have succeeded to call the constructor of your WCF Service and could now add further logic to reference methods with it.  

    f.         Click F5 to allow the web client to continue.

     

    From this point on, any programmer should be able to add additional methods, change the name of the service, and look forward to the eventual deployment of there WCF Service.   Thank you for your guidance.

     

    Sincerely,

     

     

    Burton G. Wilkins, .Net Developer.

     


    .Net Developer
    • Marked as answer by Burt Wilkins Tuesday, March 17, 2009 9:40 PM
    Tuesday, March 17, 2009 9:40 PM