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Why do you need the .vspscc and .vssscc files?

    Question

  • Just wondering.  In general these VCS overhead files are annoying and kind of get in the way.  Can't you just stuff everything you need to know into the .sln and .*proj files?
    Wednesday, May 25, 2005 4:25 AM

Answers

  • Team Foundation uses these to store lists of files that have been excluded from source control.  We leveraged some of the existing SCC integration layer in Visual Studio to integrate Team Foundation, and these files were one of the carryovers.  I'll have to check into what the logic was in breaking out these SCC settings into separate files as opposed to putting them in the solution and project files' SCC sections.
    Wednesday, May 25, 2005 5:00 PM

All replies

  • Team Foundation uses these to store lists of files that have been excluded from source control.  We leveraged some of the existing SCC integration layer in Visual Studio to integrate Team Foundation, and these files were one of the carryovers.  I'll have to check into what the logic was in breaking out these SCC settings into separate files as opposed to putting them in the solution and project files' SCC sections.
    Wednesday, May 25, 2005 5:00 PM
  •  

    But should these files be included in source control repositories, or excluded?  For example, a .suo file shouldn't be checked into source control.  What about .vspscc and .vssscc files?
    Tuesday, July 08, 2008 11:33 PM
  • If you use Visual Studio's "Add Solution to Source Control" feature it will take care of adding the "correct" files to source control.  And yes, it does add the .vspscc and vssscc files to source control.

    Tuesday, July 08, 2008 11:39 PM
  • Hi,

    How to exclude files from source control?

    In my case, I convert visual studio 2005 solution with some projects to Visual Studio 2008.

    There, I selected the option to exclude files from source control or some thing like that.
    Then, the file which is checkedin has been converted and there's a message saying 'not under source control'.

    But the thing is some files which has been checked out still have the link with source control.
    So, an error comes saying '... name space is missing'

    That's why I want to exclude those files from source control.

    Please help!

    Regards,
    Jay...

    So Little time; So much to do!
    Tuesday, June 09, 2009 12:49 PM
  •   It is annoying that the .vspscc file gets checked out every time you modify a project.  It would be nicer if the file was just checked out as needed. 
    *w*
    Wednesday, December 23, 2009 8:39 PM
  • We are looking into improving this in the future version of Visual Studio.
    Michal Malecki TFS Version Control Client
    • Proposed as answer by Craigfis Wednesday, November 03, 2010 4:48 PM
    Thursday, September 09, 2010 9:33 PM
  • From my understanding these files should be excluded from source control if you are working on a Solution with other developers. I have found that including these files causes a lot of merge issues with team projects.
    Wednesday, September 21, 2011 1:09 AM
  • Why should they be in either? These are TFS specific control files, why should their content be embedded nodes in a solution file? That's just more unnecessary bloat. Also, why drop these files into the workspace folder, they serve no other purpose that TFS settings for a solution, within Visual studio, so why no store this information somewhere else, like all other Visual studio specific settings, like the workspace mappings, preferences, license information etc.

    We work with offline contractors that use many different source control repositories and we require they do not put repo specific junk into our repository. If they have TFS, embedding their repo information into a solution to be checked into ours would be just like someone checking in subversion folders.

    Thursday, December 12, 2013 7:55 PM
  • can i delete it..because it create problem while checkIn
    Wednesday, March 12, 2014 5:59 AM
  • It's interesting that this discussion started way back in 2005 and now, almost ten years later, it still hasn't been resolved...  We still have the .vssscc files and they are still a problem  

    Fortunately, when I open a project outside of the Source Control Explorer, it works just fine and doesn't require these files to be created.  What we're going to do is tell our engineers to open solutions outside of the source control window, and if they do open them from there to say "No" to bind the solution to source control.  This is especially true since we are using local workspaces.

    Anyone disagree?


    Bruce

    10 hours 29 minutes ago