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Open Souce .NET Framework

    Question

  • Since  Microsoft claims that .NET framework is opensource, Which part of it is actually opensource ? Other then .NET Reflector Pro is there any other tool through which we can see all the .NET framework source code. Can we load .NET framework source code in Visual studio and see the soluting along with projects and cs files ?
    Monday, October 17, 2011 10:52 AM

Answers

  • The common definition of Open Source includes the right to copy, modify and redistribute the code (usually with a viral implication). The Microsoft Reference Source License is a lot more restrictive than that, so it doesn't fit that definition of Open Source. I advise that you read carefully the MS-RSL and the modified version applied to the .NET Framework.

    @JohnWein: the links you posted may need fixing. I believe you posted the contents of this page.

    --m

    • Marked as answer by Paul Zhou Tuesday, October 25, 2011 5:56 AM
    Monday, October 17, 2011 7:20 PM

All replies

  • Can we disassemble the CLR library (mscoree.dll) ? if yes, which tools do we need ? . Since Microsoft claims that .NET Framework is opensource that means CLR is also a part of opensource code ? Since CLR is a CLI implementation...can we know what parts of CLR in which language
    • Edited by Gopala Krishna Monday, October 17, 2011 11:13 AM
    • Merged by Paul Zhou Wednesday, October 19, 2011 5:51 AM the same question
    Monday, October 17, 2011 10:56 AM
  • .Net framework is not an open source. It is a free redistuable Package.

    Below are some free open source clr available

    Mono
    Portable.NET
    CrossNet
    Microsoft's .NET Micro Framework

    Although Mscoree.dll is part of the .NET framework, it is an unmanaged DLL. It is also a COM server.

    You can easily see its exported functions using either the Dependency Walker (Depends.Exe) or the Dumpbin.exe utility.

     


    Lingaraj Mishra
    • Marked as answer by Gopala Krishna Monday, October 17, 2011 11:22 AM
    • Unmarked as answer by Gopala Krishna Monday, October 17, 2011 12:05 PM
    Monday, October 17, 2011 11:13 AM
  • Hi Lingaraj,

    Thanks for the answer. it clarifies most of my questions. Could you please read the below article by Scott and comment on this ?

    http://weblogs.asp.net/scottgu/archive/2008/01/16/net-framework-library-source-code-now-available.aspx

    http://weblogs.asp.net/scottgu/archive/2007/10/03/releasing-the-source-code-for-the-net-framework-libraries.aspx

    Gopal

    Monday, October 17, 2011 11:22 AM
  • You can inspect most of the BCL using tools like Il Spy, but if you want to recreate the actual projects and source code it's up to you to do so.

    Be aware, though, that the .NET Framework is not open source as far as I know; it is an open standard (both ECMA and ISO) and you can get hold of the source code under the Microsoft Shared Source initiative, but none of this amounts to an open source license. You may want to check these facts before you attempt to release your own derivative work of the .NET Framework.

    HTH
    --mc

    Monday, October 17, 2011 11:32 AM
  • It's all open source.  Microsoft calls it Reference Source.  Download what you want and you can step through it during debugging, but (WARNING) that gets old quickly.  The Reference Source forum has full info.
    • Edited by JohnWein Monday, October 17, 2011 11:50 AM
    Monday, October 17, 2011 11:50 AM
  • Monday, October 17, 2011 11:53 AM
  • Hi John,

    Could you please provide me the links fo rthe reference source ? Also could you please provide me the links which confirms me that .NET CLR code is also open source ? I guess the code for CLR is written in C++ and CLR is implemented as COM server. Am i right ?



    Monday, October 17, 2011 12:10 PM
  • The CLR is NOT open source.  The available reference source is long out of date (years). 

    If you want an open source alternative, look at Mono.


    -cd Mark the best replies as answers!
    Monday, October 17, 2011 3:51 PM
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    • Edited by JohnWein Monday, October 17, 2011 7:23 PM
    Monday, October 17, 2011 4:01 PM
  • The common definition of Open Source includes the right to copy, modify and redistribute the code (usually with a viral implication). The Microsoft Reference Source License is a lot more restrictive than that, so it doesn't fit that definition of Open Source. I advise that you read carefully the MS-RSL and the modified version applied to the .NET Framework.

    @JohnWein: the links you posted may need fixing. I believe you posted the contents of this page.

    --m

    • Marked as answer by Paul Zhou Tuesday, October 25, 2011 5:56 AM
    Monday, October 17, 2011 7:20 PM