none
C++ compiler for Windows 7 Home Premium 64 bit

    Question

  • Hi,

    I am looking for a C++ compiler for my windows 7 Home premium 64 bit. By compiler, I mean like the Turbo C classic IDE that runs on MSDOS ni win XP machines.

    I had that installable which i used to install in my Win XP,  I tried to run it in Win 7 64 bit with that win xP sp2 compatibility mode, but it would not start.

     

    Then i tried looking for it on the internet, I had a suggesstion to install DOSBOX and go with it, but it would not work too.

    So, I need an IDE kind of thing that works with Win 7 64 bit. I could try some links that you guys gonna post.

    Any working versions of the program( previously tested) would be appreciated.

    Thanks, Maran.

    Monday, September 06, 2010 12:47 PM

Answers

  • Hi David, Thanks for the reply!

    but I am looking for the normal C++ compiler that runs in a DOS environment. Cause thats what I was taught with at school/college.

    I am sure this Visual C++ 2010 express would allow you to run normal C++ programs.. Please confirm this one. :)

    Yes, Visual C++ 2010 Express is a C++ compiler. I'm not exactly sure what you mean by "normal". If you want to use it from the command line, for example, you certainly can. But you really should learn to use the IDE which will make you much more productive. 
    And I already have a licensed VS 2005, but I am yet to check if it allows to program C++ with Win 7 64 bit.
    Yes, it can. Sounds like you never tried it. Make sure you apply the latest service pack.
    Monday, September 06, 2010 4:06 PM
  • You can compile and link programs on the command line using the same compiler and linker that the Visual Studio IDE uses.

    VS 2005 can be used to build 64-bit programs, but you have to make sure that the appropriate component is installed.  Everything You Need To Know To Start Programming 64-Bit Windows Systems is old but still relevant.

    For Windows 7 functionality, you will also need a suitable Windows SDK for Windows 7; the current one still supports VS 2005 - make sure you read the Release Notes.


    Answering policy: see profile.
    Monday, September 06, 2010 4:07 PM

All replies

  • Well, the obvious candidate is the Visual C++ 2010 Express edition.  This is free (with registration) but doesn't come with MFC and some other stuff that the paid-for editions have.
    Answering policy: see profile.
    Monday, September 06, 2010 1:20 PM
  • Hi David, Thanks for the reply!

    but I am looking for the normal C++ compiler that runs in a DOS environment. Cause thats what I was taught with at school/college.

    I am sure this Visual C++ 2010 express would allow you to run normal C++ programs.. Please confirm this one. :)

     

    And I already have a licensed VS 2005, but I am yet to check if it allows to program C++ with Win 7 64 bit.

    - Maran.

    Monday, September 06, 2010 3:41 PM
  • Hi David, Thanks for the reply!

    but I am looking for the normal C++ compiler that runs in a DOS environment. Cause thats what I was taught with at school/college.

    I am sure this Visual C++ 2010 express would allow you to run normal C++ programs.. Please confirm this one. :)

    Yes, Visual C++ 2010 Express is a C++ compiler. I'm not exactly sure what you mean by "normal". If you want to use it from the command line, for example, you certainly can. But you really should learn to use the IDE which will make you much more productive. 
    And I already have a licensed VS 2005, but I am yet to check if it allows to program C++ with Win 7 64 bit.
    Yes, it can. Sounds like you never tried it. Make sure you apply the latest service pack.
    Monday, September 06, 2010 4:06 PM
  • You can compile and link programs on the command line using the same compiler and linker that the Visual Studio IDE uses.

    VS 2005 can be used to build 64-bit programs, but you have to make sure that the appropriate component is installed.  Everything You Need To Know To Start Programming 64-Bit Windows Systems is old but still relevant.

    For Windows 7 functionality, you will also need a suitable Windows SDK for Windows 7; the current one still supports VS 2005 - make sure you read the Release Notes.


    Answering policy: see profile.
    Monday, September 06, 2010 4:07 PM
  • Hello Brian, 

    By Normal I meant, the Turbo C++ compiler that we used in olden days. Sorry, i should have been a techie here. But this compiler is for my sister who's pursuing Computer engineering at college. They dont use an IDE like VS.

    Anyways, I will make her learn the IDE. Thanks :)

     

    - Maran

    Monday, September 06, 2010 5:40 PM
  • Great! I will try the Windows SDK.

    Thanks to both of you guys! I am pretty much packed this week, I would try the suggesstions and let my sissy know about them by the weekend. :)

     

    - Maran.

    Monday, September 06, 2010 5:44 PM
  • THE BEST OPTION IS DEV C++ COMPILER .......ITS VERY GOOD ON 64 BIT AND HANDY FOR SOFTWARE DEVOLPERS
    Saturday, January 15, 2011 2:53 PM
  • Turbo C++ (Dos style Compiler) :    http://www.windows7download.com/win7-turbo-c-/pblhvcrj.html

     

    How install it on your 64 bit system:  http://blog.bestsoftware4download.com/2010/02/how-to-install-turbo-c-on-windows-7-64bit/

     

    Hope these links help..

    • Proposed as answer by esmiller67 Friday, February 04, 2011 12:58 AM
    Friday, February 04, 2011 12:58 AM
  • Hi there,

    I would recomend you use the Intel C++ compiler (now sold as Intel Composer XE) it will work with MSVS and standalone UI - including a comand line option

    Regards

     

    David


    • Proposed as answer by c s nair Sunday, April 29, 2012 5:18 AM
    Wednesday, April 27, 2011 2:11 PM