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Best price for BUYING SQL SERVER 2008 R2 STANDARD?

    Question

  • Hello!

    is it possible to BUY SQL Server, with one-time fee?

    has anyone bought it like that, and what would be the price?

    we're looking forward installing STANDARD edition over EXPRESS on our server, but would like to have it as one-time fee and not monthly per-processor or simmilar ?

    Thanx!

    Wednesday, May 23, 2012 9:01 AM

Answers

  • SQL Server 2008 R2 - 1 Server + 10 CALs = US$2,000 (approx) ($880 for the server and $120 each for the CALs)

    SQL Server 2008 R2 - 1 Processor = $6,800 (approx)

    Buying a Processor licence means you never have to buy extra CALs for new users.

    From the above prices you can see that the break-even point between the two licence models is about 50 users/devices. If you have more than 50 (or can anticipate that you will get there soon) then the Processor licence will be cheaper.


    Simon Jones
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    Wednesday, May 23, 2012 11:08 AM

All replies

  • Hello Miroslav,

    For an on-premise SQL Server you don't have to pay a monthly fee; that's only for SQL Azure database.

    You pay once a server license and eighter user CAL's or a processor license (since 2012 it's a core license)


    Olaf Helper
    * cogito ergo sum * errare humanum est * quote erat demonstrandum *
    Wenn ich denke, ist das ein Fehler und das beweise ich täglich
    Blog Xing

    Wednesday, May 23, 2012 9:11 AM
  • Olaf,

    Thanks for fast reply!

    - is it still possible to buy 2008 R2, or do they sell only 2012 now?

    - what would be price TO REALLY BUY SQL Standard edition?

    it's kind of confusing to find out such information, so i am looking to you guys, hopefully YOu have such experience and fast reply! :)

    over EXPRESS edition, we just need two things:

    - 10 GB max removed

    - 1 core server usage removed

    so, if there is some version in between EXPRESS and STANDARD that can do this, it would fork for us as well.

    Thanks

    Wednesday, May 23, 2012 9:19 AM
  • SQL Server's current version is 2012

    The different versions are available in two different purchasing models

    1. Priced Per Core
    2. Priced Per Server + Per User/Per Device

    SQL Server 2012 Standard edition is available in either of these model. Which is better for you depends on the number of cores you want to use in your server and the number of users or devices you want to connect. Calculate both and then look at any expansion plans you have. If you don't want to pay more later to add extra users then Per Core licencing would be the best option though it may cost more.

    You can buy the licence(s) you want outright with one payment or you can, with some volume licensing plans, spread the cost over three years. You can add Software Assurance if you want (though it is included by default in Open Value Licences) which pays for any upgrades to your software during the SA agreement term.

    Some retailers may still have stock of SQL Server 2008 R2. It uses per processor licencing rather than per core but is otherwise the same.


    Simon Jones
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    Wednesday, May 23, 2012 9:21 AM
  • - what would be price TO REALLY BUY SQL Standard edition?

    ...

    so, if there is some version in between EXPRESS and STANDARD that can do this, it would fork for us as well.

    For real prices visit some online shops, like http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Dsoftware&field-keywords=sql+server+2008r2+standard+edition

    For 2008R2 there was also a web and a cheaper workgroup available, but with 2012 they have been remove. For a feature compare of 2008R2 see http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc645993


    Olaf Helper
    * cogito ergo sum * errare humanum est * quote erat demonstrandum *
    Wenn ich denke, ist das ein Fehler und das beweise ich täglich
    Blog Xing

    Wednesday, May 23, 2012 9:36 AM
  • Simon,

    - our application is IIS 3 tier

    - it will have maybe max 5-10 users connected at any given time.

    what do you think would be the best option for us?

    also - will 2012 SQL be OK with LS v1.0 ?

    Wednesday, May 23, 2012 9:53 AM
  • Currently LS don't support SQL Server 2012, see:
    http://visualstudio.uservoice.com/forums/127959-visual-studio-lightswitch/suggestions/2733549-support-for-sql-server-2012
    http://geekswithblogs.net/GGBlogger/archive/2012/02/11/microsoft-lightswitch-and-sql-2012.aspx

    But if you buy a 2012 licence you can "downgrad", means with the 2012 licence you are allowed to install 2008R2 instead. As soon as LS support 2012 you can upgrade to 2012.


    Olaf Helper
    * cogito ergo sum * errare humanum est * quote erat demonstrandum *
    Wenn ich denke, ist das ein Fehler und das beweise ich täglich
    Blog Xing

    Wednesday, May 23, 2012 10:13 AM
  • What do you mean "to really buy"? You can't "really buy" Software, unless you have it made for you - then you own the copyright and you can do what you want with it.

    What you buy from Microsoft is always "a licence to run the software". Unless you buy a subscription licence with a fixed term (or you buy OEM licence with some new hardware or Product KeyCard to upgrade a trial) your licence is a perpetual for the version you purchase. You only get upgrades to new versions if you purchase Software Assurance. (OEM and Product KeyCard licences die with the hardware - you can't transfer them to other computers even if you destroy the old computer or uninstall the software from it.)

    For SQL Server you have to buy a licence to run on a number of Cores (or Processors) OR you buy a licence for the Server plus a Client Access Licence (CAL) for each User or Device you want to connect.

    It doesn't matter whether you "buy" from a bricks and mortar shop, over the web or from a volume licence specialist, you are still only getting a licence to run the software. The installation pack may come on a DVD or as a download, you may get a box or not, what matters is the licence.

    How much it costs depends on where you live and which retailer you go to.


    Simon Jones
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    Wednesday, May 23, 2012 10:41 AM
  • Simon,

    Thanx for detailed answer.

    we had couple of proposals - so far it was only over monthly payments (kind of renting, pay-per-month).

    what we need is ONE TIME PAYMENT, so we dont have to worry about that each month, this is what i meant by "really buying", sorry for not expressing better.

    Thanks again!

    Wednesday, May 23, 2012 10:52 AM
  • It isn't how many users/devices are connected at any give time. It is how many separate users/devices may be connected.

    You only get Downgrade rights if you purchase Software Assurance (or it is included in your volume licence agreement - EG Open Value).

    For 10 users (with no possibility of exceeding this) it will usually be cheaper to purchase 1 Server licence + 10 CALs. If you might need more users later then if you get to 25, 50 or 75 CALs a per Core/Processor licence may be cheaper so if you're going to get there soon you may choose to purchase per Core/Processor now rather than wait.


    Simon Jones
    If you found this post helpful, please "Vote as Helpful". If it actually answered your question, please remember to "Mark as Answer". This will help other people find answers to their problems more quickly.

    Wednesday, May 23, 2012 10:54 AM
  • SQL Server 2008 R2 - 1 Server + 10 CALs = US$2,000 (approx) ($880 for the server and $120 each for the CALs)

    SQL Server 2008 R2 - 1 Processor = $6,800 (approx)

    Buying a Processor licence means you never have to buy extra CALs for new users.

    From the above prices you can see that the break-even point between the two licence models is about 50 users/devices. If you have more than 50 (or can anticipate that you will get there soon) then the Processor licence will be cheaper.


    Simon Jones
    If you found this post helpful, please "Vote as Helpful". If it actually answered your question, please remember to "Mark as Answer". This will help other people find answers to their problems more quickly.

    Wednesday, May 23, 2012 11:08 AM
  • Simon,

    THANX A MILLION, this is info i was trying to get, but somehow it was impossible for me to get straight answer like this.

    i know i am a pain :) just this:

    - if we go ahead for any of those licenses - can i use it on some VIRTUAL SERVER for couple of months, and then migrate to another server, or once installed license is valid only for that machine?

    - is it still possible to buy 2008R2 as that is needed for our LS app.?

    THANX!

    Wednesday, May 23, 2012 11:24 AM
  • Providing you don't buy a cheap OEM licence then you can install on a Virtual Server and then move to a Physical Server at a later date. OEM licences cannot (legally) be moved from one machine to another. That's one of the reasons they are so cheap - If you change the hardware you have to buy the software licence again.

    If you buy Processor licence(s) then you must, legally, set the options for SQL Server to run on the number of processors for which you have licences. IE if you only buy one Processor licence but your physical or virtual machine has two then you must tell SQL Server to only use one Processor.

    If you buy Server + CAL licences you have to have enough CALs for all the users who will use SQL Server. Not the number of concurrent users but the total number of named users. (If someone leaves, or changes jobs so they will not use the SQL Server any more, their licence can be reused by a new person.) If lots of users will all use the same PC(s) you can count the total number of "devices" rather than users and purchase CALs for the devices.

    Yes, you can still buy SQL Server 2008 R2 though stocks are getting low at some retailers.


    Simon Jones
    If you found this post helpful, please "Vote as Helpful". If it actually answered your question, please remember to "Mark as Answer". This will help other people find answers to their problems more quickly.

    Wednesday, May 23, 2012 11:36 AM
  • Simon,

    me again :-)

    does Sql Server 2008 R2 Web Edition exists?

    given the scenario (3 tier IIS), maybe it would be the best thing?

    i am sorry for taking so much of your time, but sales reps i talked with seems to know about this even less than me :)

    Thanx!

    Wednesday, May 23, 2012 11:57 AM
  • Web and Workgroup editions of SQL Server 2008 R2 are still available (though stock will be limited) but they have fewer features than Standard. For instance you don't get Integration or Analysis Services with Web or Workgroup editions and Reporting Services has reduced functionality.

    See here for a comparison of the different editions. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc645993(v=sql.105).aspx

    It doesn't matter if you are using a 3-tier IIS application as to which edition you buy.

    Get yourself a better sales rep.


    Simon Jones
    If you found this post helpful, please "Vote as Helpful". If it actually answered your question, please remember to "Mark as Answer". This will help other people find answers to their problems more quickly.

    Wednesday, May 23, 2012 1:08 PM