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In-Place RESTORE procedure using Power Tool ???

    Dotaz

  • Ok, I'm relatively new to TFS as I've been evaluating it for the last 2 months as we are thinking of migrating from ClearCase.  I've been a ClearCase admin for 15 years.

    So I have a TFS 2010 test environment setup.  I've got the Dec 2011 Power Toys installed on the server.  I've got a backup setup/running successfully for the last 2 weeks using the power toy.

    Now I want to simply perform a test in-place restore using the Power toy.  All pieces of TFS are installed on this one test server so I'm thinking this should be simple stupid/slam dunk ...NOT!

    What is the correct procedure for doing this!?  First I get errors about databases in use, etc.  So I run the 'tfsservicecontrol quiesce' command and try again only to encounter more errors in the power tool restore indicating databases exists and they need to be dropped, etc. 

    Seriously ...I'm pulling my hair out.  Can't the power toy wizard handle an in-place restore with existing databases?  Apparently not.

    Does anyone know what hoops I need to jump thru in order to perform this simple restore scenario successfully?  Unbelievable.


    • Upravený jdlaw64 13. března 2012 17:25
    13. března 2012 17:24

Odpovědi

  • Thanks for the reply.  I guess what I was trying to do is a hybrid of #1.  It's pretty straight forward ... I have a TFS server that's been online for about 30 days in a test environment with everything installed on the one server (TFS, SQL Reporting/Analsyis services, and Sharepoint.).  I wasn't uninstalling anything, removing databases, etc.  I simply wanted to test the restore process "in-place" w/out uninstalling anything, etc.  For example on a "live" functional TFS server.

    I managed to hack my way through it.  Initially I was getting errors early on in the restore wizard with errors indicating the SQL databases needed to be dropped, etc. before the wizard could proceed.  I ended up dropping the databases and removing them, then ran the wizard again and eventually was successful.  My mistake was thinking the restore wizard could overwrite the existing databases.

    I also tested a restore process on a TFS 2011 Preview server using the Microsoft procedure using SQL Server Management Studio where I restored the databases manually as well as transaction logs using marked transactions.  While that was more time consuming it worked the first time as SQL Server Mgt Studio does have the option to overwrite existing databases.



    14. března 2012 3:50

Všechny reakce

  • Hi Jdlaw64, 

    Thanks for your post.

    Does your In-place restore mean that back up TFS 2010 databases using TFS Power Tools, then restore the backed up databases back to the current TFS 2010 using TFS Power Tools? If yes, to backup and restore TFS 2010 using TFS Power Tools, please refer to the detailed steps in this article: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/bharry/archive/2010/08/18/backing-up-and-restoring-your-tfs-server.aspxand http://myalmblog.com/2010/09/12/tfs-2010-power-tools-tfs-backup-and-restore-hands-on-lab/.

    There are two paths to choose from when upgrading TFS 2005/2008 to TFS 2010:  “In-Place” upgrade and “Migration” upgrade.

        Path 1: An In-Place upgrade is defined as an upgrade where you use the same set of hardware that is running the current TFS version.  In this scenario you will be uninstalling the current TFS version, upgrading any pre-required components such as SQL Server and SharePoint server, and then installing TFS and running the Upgrade Wizard.

        Path 2: A Migration upgrade is defined as an upgrade where you using a separate duplicate set of hardware to perform the upgrade.  In this scenario you will be installing the pre-required components, copying the existing TFS related databases over and then installing TFS and running the Upgrade Wizard.

    For the upgrade detailed information, please refer to this blog: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/bkrieger/archive/2009/10/21/team-foundation-server-2010-upgrade.aspx?CommentPosted=true#commentmessage.   


    John Qiao [MSFT]
    MSDN Community Support | Feedback to us

    14. března 2012 2:24
    Moderátor
  • Thanks for the reply.  I guess what I was trying to do is a hybrid of #1.  It's pretty straight forward ... I have a TFS server that's been online for about 30 days in a test environment with everything installed on the one server (TFS, SQL Reporting/Analsyis services, and Sharepoint.).  I wasn't uninstalling anything, removing databases, etc.  I simply wanted to test the restore process "in-place" w/out uninstalling anything, etc.  For example on a "live" functional TFS server.

    I managed to hack my way through it.  Initially I was getting errors early on in the restore wizard with errors indicating the SQL databases needed to be dropped, etc. before the wizard could proceed.  I ended up dropping the databases and removing them, then ran the wizard again and eventually was successful.  My mistake was thinking the restore wizard could overwrite the existing databases.

    I also tested a restore process on a TFS 2011 Preview server using the Microsoft procedure using SQL Server Management Studio where I restored the databases manually as well as transaction logs using marked transactions.  While that was more time consuming it worked the first time as SQL Server Mgt Studio does have the option to overwrite existing databases.



    14. března 2012 3:50
  • Hi Jdlaw64, 

    Thanks for your reply.

    And thank you for sharing your experience here.

    For more information about TFS 11,  you can post it at TFS vNextforum for the better response. 

    All your participation and support are very important to build such harmonious/ pleasant / learning environment for MSDN community. 


    John Qiao [MSFT]
    MSDN Community Support | Feedback to us

    14. března 2012 7:48
    Moderátor