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SSIS Projects in Visual Studio 2010 Beta 2

    Question

  • Is there any way to open/upgrade or create an SSIS project (2008) in vs 2010 b2?  I want to migrate my datawarehousing solution and these projects are excluded and it says they are not valid with this application...
    Wednesday, October 28, 2009 6:45 PM

Answers

  • So I am guessing this will come with R2 of sql 08 or something like that as an add on?

    No.  SSIS 2008 will work only with VS 2008.  Just like SSIS 2005 only works with VS 2005.   Also, you don't need the full VS suite installed to get SSIS.  SSIS comes with its own "light" version of VS.
    Phil Brammer | http://www.ssistalk.com | Twitter: http://twitter.com/PhilBrammer
    Monday, November 02, 2009 1:57 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • The support for SSIS 2008 is with Visual Studio 2008.  You should be able to install both environments though, so that you can continue testing VS 2010 while still supporting SSIS.
    Phil Brammer | http://www.ssistalk.com | Twitter: http://twitter.com/PhilBrammer
    Wednesday, October 28, 2009 7:09 PM
    Moderator
  • I think I have the same question as frickg. if we are going to create new solution for SSIS in VS2010. Are we going to get SSIS project in VS2010. Or will will have to use SSIS in VS2008 forever.

    Thanks,
    Charlie.
    Thursday, October 29, 2009 12:17 PM
  • I think I have the same question as frickg. if we are going to create new solution for SSIS in VS2010. Are we going to get SSIS project in VS2010. Or will will have to use SSIS in VS2008 forever.

    Thanks,
    Charlie.

    For SSIS 2008, you will have to use VS 2008.  You can have VS 2008 and VS 2010 running side-by-side though. 


    Phil Brammer | http://www.ssistalk.com | Twitter: http://twitter.com/PhilBrammer
    Thursday, October 29, 2009 12:21 PM
    Moderator
  • I think I have the same question as frickg. if we are going to create new solution for SSIS in VS2010. Are we going to get SSIS project in VS2010. Or will will have to use SSIS in VS2008 forever.

    Thanks,
    Charlie.

    For SSIS 2008, you will have to use VS 2008.  You can have VS 2008 and VS 2010 running side-by-side though. 


    Phil Brammer | http://www.ssistalk.com | Twitter: http://twitter.com/PhilBrammer

    But I think what we are both asking is there a 2010 project type for SSIS, I don't mind recreating the project I just want to work in 2010...
    Sunday, November 01, 2009 11:42 PM

  • But I think what we are both asking is there a 2010 project type for SSIS, I don't mind recreating the project I just want to work in 2010...

    No, there is no SSIS project support in VS 2010. 
    Phil Brammer | http://www.ssistalk.com | Twitter: http://twitter.com/PhilBrammer
    Monday, November 02, 2009 12:31 AM
    Moderator
  • So I am guessing this will come with R2 of sql 08 or something like that as an add on?
    Monday, November 02, 2009 2:31 AM
  • So I am guessing this will come with R2 of sql 08 or something like that as an add on?

    No.  SSIS 2008 will work only with VS 2008.  Just like SSIS 2005 only works with VS 2005.   Also, you don't need the full VS suite installed to get SSIS.  SSIS comes with its own "light" version of VS.
    Phil Brammer | http://www.ssistalk.com | Twitter: http://twitter.com/PhilBrammer
    Monday, November 02, 2009 1:57 PM
    Moderator
  • Phil, 

    I understand, however now I am forced to maintain 2 solutions if I want to move to 2010, one for my test projects/database projects/Dal project and a 2008 solution just for my ETL projects.  

    I was just hoping since 2005 supported an SSIS project type, so did 2008, that soon a 2010 SSIS compatable project type would come out.

    That way I could migrate my ETLs to the 2010 project type and have all my projects in one clean solution.  

    Seeing as we are constantly bouncing between the test project, database project, DAL project and ETL for every user story, having to jump between 2 IDEs is not practical especially since the memory footprint is huge for VS08 and VS2010...
    Wednesday, November 04, 2009 9:43 PM
  • Let your voice be heard:  http://connect.microsoft.com/sqlserver/feedback
    Phil Brammer | http://www.ssistalk.com | Twitter: http://twitter.com/PhilBrammer
    Wednesday, November 04, 2009 10:12 PM
    Moderator
  • I'll vote for that connect submission too :)
    Thursday, November 05, 2009 12:02 AM
  • it's possible that the next version of ssis will work with vs 2010...but i wouldn't bank on that.

    Duane Douglas, MCAD, MCITP | http://www.ssisbi.com | Please mark the post(s) that answered your question.

    SSIS Business Intelligence

    Thursday, November 05, 2009 9:53 AM
    Moderator
  • I have to install BIDS 2005, BIDS 2008 and now VS2010, appropriate Team Foundation Server Clients and maintain with proper service packs.  This is a major pain.  I have voted for this connect issue.  In .NET we can target a specific assembly version, we should be able to do the same within BIDS.  I do realize that BIDS 2010 isn't realeased yet as SQL 2008 R2 isn't 2010 it's only a half step, however there has to be a better solution to this.
    Wednesday, March 10, 2010 1:20 AM
  • Hey Phil,

    Since there is STILL no response on connect, can you follow up for the community that does not wish to maintain mutliple solutions for projects. This piece alone is going to hold our company back from moving forward to VSTS 2010 as our group is the driving force to upgrade. But with this increased risk and complexity to maintain our projects I can't see our executive signing off on the upgrade.

     

     

    Again if you are a BIDS developer, please vote up; https://connect.microsoft.com/SQLServer/feedback/details/508552/ssis-vs2010-project-type?wa=wsignin1.0

    Monday, March 22, 2010 11:14 PM
  • MSFT really needs to respond to the connect issue.  This whole situation is not wise.
    Wednesday, April 14, 2010 6:49 PM
  • This is just insane.

    I can't really believe what i just read, Microsoft never stops surprising me.

    I never learn, and violated my golden rule:

    NEVER install a product from MS which dont have a service pack.

     

    I guess we need to wait for MSSQL2010 to finally get the SSIS projects in VS2010.

    Or if MS finally understands the need for SSIS 2008 support in VS2010 SP1.

     

     

     

    Tuesday, April 20, 2010 1:22 PM
  • Hey Todd,

     

    There is still no comment/response by MS regarding  https://connect.microsoft.com/SQLServer/feedback/details/508552/ssis-vs2010-project-type?wa=wsignin1.0 .

    I would be elated to move forward with a proposal to move to TFS 2010 as this would improve my world 1000 times. Unfortunately, this isn't an option until we have an idea on when this would be functional in our business.

     

    Monday, April 26, 2010 6:51 PM
  • I agree.  Having to manage two IDE's just to support an SSIS project is painful.
    Monday, April 26, 2010 8:52 PM
  • My belief - totally unsupported or informed by anything I know or don't know from MSFT - is that SSIS 2005/2008 won't be supported as a project type in 2010.  I think we'll have to wait until the next SQL for that.  What do I base that on?  Pure speculation based on...

    1. They didn't support SSIS2005 projects in VS 2008, even though not much (if anything) really changed in the "design" experience.

    2. The next SQL (forget 2008R2) isn't "that far" away (to MSFT :)) if you subscribe to the theory of a 3-4 year release cycle.  Remember the hammering they got when 2005 was "too long" after 2000, and then you have 2008.  Carrying that forward implies a new SQL sometime in 2011... maybe.  If they just have to wait a year or so... why do something now that they didn't do for three years?

    Personally, it's almost unreal how much they do get cross-compatible.  The SQL guys have to line up with the VStudio releases, Office (Excel PowerPivot for example), and SharePoint (now part of Office, but wasn't).  Not that I'm excusing them - I too think it's really bad not to support all "earlier" project types on a "later" dev tool.  Their architecture should have allowed for that from the get-go.  (VS 08 should allow SSIS 2005 + 2008, VS 10 should allow both as well.)


    Todd McDermid's Blog Talk to me now on
    Monday, April 26, 2010 9:01 PM
    Moderator
  • Well you know what the list of users would have to say on a Customer Experience Stand point... Microsoft isn't recognizing the customers from one of their fastest expanding product lines and ensuring that they have a consistent user experience when using MS products. 

    You (by which I mean MS) have to know every single one of us does more than just BIDS and Databases. I would say it is more likely that this group of users is on the bleeding edge of all other products as well, as we have had to be to get the best from our SQL Servers. So why not do the same for our .Net experience. Which means that if we wish to move forward in one area we have to have a ridiculously broken Development Experience?  

    I hope this is just a Bad Product Road Map which hasn’t YET been nipped in the butt.

     

    • Proposed as answer by wdhowellsr Wednesday, April 28, 2010 1:31 PM
    Tuesday, April 27, 2010 12:43 PM
  • This is not good.  I'm about to start a project upgrading the bar code scanners for one of the largest grocery stores in North America.  I've been using VS 2010 for a while and currently do all of my development in 2010.

    I was about to submit my project overview when I decided to check how SSIS was different in 2010 and found this page.

    There is no way I'm going to devote anymore time with VS 2010 if it won't support SSIS anytime soon and I expect to tell every single Corporate SSIS customer the same thing.

    There was a rumor that when Netscape came out, Bill Gates personally walked into the Office Development team and said, "Stop what you are doing and get me an Internet browser immediately."  Let's hope Steve Balmer steps up on this one because Windows Mobile 7 and SSIS are the best thing to happen to the handheld industry and not having it will reverberate throughout the world of such development.

    I apologize for being so verbose but this is serious trouble were getting into here.

     


    William HOwell
    Wednesday, April 28, 2010 1:31 PM
  • Just adding my voice as well that I concur.   Many dev shops are no longer doing waterfall with huge release cycles where the tools get locked in a long time in advance.  Having to wait a year for my VS2010 to support SSIS project types is an eternity for an agile shop that is able to quickly migrate from .Net 3.5 to .Net 4.0. 

    Is this really so hard? I can understand Tools is a huge org in MSFT with lots of bureaucracy, but they do have incubation teams so can choose to be more streamlined when they choose.  A small team with a single focus should be able to crank this out as an add on, could they not?  Heck, that's the message they sell to ISV's - that it's easy to extend the IDE.  So...if it's easy for an ISV, would it not be reasonable that it would be even easier for MSFT?

    It's low hanging fruit for MSFT, big benefit for the developer community esp. when we're being aggressively woo'd by competitors.

    Friday, May 07, 2010 5:49 PM
  • First of all I am new to SIS and was about to work through some exercises to get up to speed on it.  I am primarily a C# programmer and was reading through this particular blog and decided it would be nice to see what is known about the elephant in the room.

     

    • Can anyone tell me why the VS and SISS versions are so tightly coupled.
    • Does anyone know why their is no VS2010 SISS 2010 solution and why (i.e. Is MS dropping support for future SISS development in favor of something else)
    • Also, just curious, why use SISS over other solutions?

     

    Thanks for you patients and tolerance with these fundamental questions.

    -SawyerDevelopment (OleDogNewTrix)

    Friday, December 03, 2010 6:47 PM
  • The versions are tightly coupled because SSIS uses a visual designer, and it's changed in each version, unlike the code-based tools like C#.  VS 2010 doesn't support the pre-2010 designer that SSIS uses.  "Denali" will use a VS 2010 compatible designer (even though CTP1 still does not).

    There is no "SSIS 2010" solution type because there is no SSIS 2010.  There is only SSIS 2008, and for the reasons above, you can't make one in VS 2010.  MSFT has given NO indication that it is dropping support for SSIS in the future - on the contrary, there is substantial evidence that support and development are continuing.  Specifically, you can look at Sql Denali CTP1.

    Depends what your "other solutions" are.  If you're talking other techs within the MSFT fold, you may want to view a video from TechEd NA 2010 where the full range of "data integration" tools from MSFT are described and compared with typical use-cases.  (Just search for "TechEd NA 2010 data integration".)  If you're comparing to "code" or T-SQL, there are a ton of reasons, most to do with maintainability and things you "get for free" with SSIS that you'd have to hand-code in those other languages.  If you're comparing to other vendors, the main point is usually cost - SSIS comes bundled with SQL Server that you've probably already paid for.  Other vendors cost in the hundreds of thousands just for a developer license.  I'm not a good resource for that aspect.


    Todd McDermid's Blog Talk to me now on
    Wednesday, December 08, 2010 12:27 AM
    Moderator
  • Todd, seriously, all dtsx packages are XML text files.  The whole premise of XML is to make it easily readable across platforms.  There should be zero issues in parsinging-out SSIS 2k5 packages all the way through present day and beyond.  It's not like they are removing functionality or tags as SSIS grows in complexity.  Backwards compatability is supremely easy to maintain at this level.  I'm working on a 2010 Custom Project type for SSIS packages.  It's just rediculous to have to maintain 3+ Installs of Visual Studio just to continue to work with SSIS.

      We all know that one word from an internal source at Microsoft carries the weight of about 2000000 words from the outside world.  You don't get the be an MVP, Moderator without having some connections.  All we are asking here is to put in the good word for the entire free-thinking world.

    Thursday, March 03, 2011 5:13 PM
  • Attu, seriously, do you think I haven't done that already?

    I'm fortunate enough to have been selected as an MVP by Microsoft, and fortunate enough that Microsoft has decided that our feedback is important.  Those aren't just words.  Last week, they spent quite a bit of cash to get 1500 of us out to the Redmond campus to hear what they're working on, and what the pain points are for using their products.  I know they listen to what I have to say, and I've said much more than what I've alluded to here.  How do I know?  It's standard practice for my group (SQL Server) to virtually tear them a few new ones every year.  They know it's coming, and they still set themselves up for it.  In the short time I've been a part of this, even I can see it has an effect, and that's encouraging.

    The reality of the situation is that backwards compatibility is not terribly important to Microsoft - or its customers - unless you're talking consumer products.  Business products, such as SQL Server are NOT usually backwards compatible.  Typically, they're "automatically upgraded with no facility to downgrade", at best, you can run in place.  Take a look at a SQL Server database.  Yes, you can move a database from 2000 to 2008 with no ill effects, keeping it in 2000 "mode".  That's with a product with millions of active installations.  As much as I like SSIS, the fact is that it is nowhere near as large as it needs to be to warrant spending that time on backwards compatibility.  SSIS is nowhere near the sales or growth level of other products in MS.  Take a look at Sharepoint - it's frikkin exploding in adoption... and is it "backwards compatible"?  Not that I can see.

    I'm not a consultant, so some of the (valid) complaints talked about here about maintaining several environments simply don't apply to me.  If or when I choose to upgrade, I won't ever need to go back.  That obviously doesn't apply to everyone.  Personally, I'd rather they address the tons of other issues I and many more others have with the product than backwards compatibility.  It's just not mature enough to point that out as a large issue - although it's no doubt an easy one to articulate and that's why it's got 400+ votes.  Compare that to pulling drive extender from WHS - another "niche" product - that has 5800+ votes.  And that was a feature that already existed.  (I'm not saying it wasn't stupid - it was, and I voted for that issue too.)

    The best you can do is submit and vote for items like that on Connect.  We (MVPs) do get inquiries from the product team like "is this issue a real problem?" - and they do listen, but they don't have all of MSFT's 50 billion dollars in cash at their disposal like I wished they did.  BTW - supporting "old" XML isn't quite as easy as you may think... have you seen the XML in the DTSX?  Calling that XML is being pretty generous... :)


    Todd McDermid's Blog Talk to me now on
    Tuesday, March 08, 2011 6:14 PM
    Moderator