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Printing on A4 paper with .25 margins

    Question

  • We have a client that targets only Portrait A4 paper, with a report size of 8.27 in x 11 in.  Margins need to be 0.25 all the way around.  We normally recommend .5 margins, but mainly due to printing on certain printers where the bottom gets cut off.  Does anyone have any experience (good or bad) to share on this format?

     

    Regards,


    David

    Thursday, June 12, 2008 2:01 AM

Answers

  • Hi,

     

    In Australia paper size of A4 is the standard size used by business. As we're a metric country I work in centimetres. A4 is 21cm width X 29.7cm height. When I create a report (.rdlc stand-alone report) I first of all design the report and get all the data stuff working properly. Sometimes the right side of the designer surface might stretch out to 25 or 30cm as I get all the fields in their approximate positions. When the report is finished I go into Report/Report Properties/Layout Tab and set the left and right margins to .5cm. Then I push fields/tables etc. to the left to bunch them up in line with the calculations below.

     

    The total width of the report is 21cm. Take off (.5+.5=1.0cm) for left and right margins. Therefore the actual report should not exceed 21cm - 1cm = 20cm. I always try and make the report width just a little narrower than this, say 19.5cm to19.8cm. So the right edge of the designer pane ends up being set around 19.5cm to 19.8cm and all the report fields have to fit within this width.

     

    In your case .25 inches = .64cm. Therefore the left and right margin total is .64 + .64 = 1.28cm. So your report designer surface should not exceed 21cm - 1.28cm = 19.72 cm. Take a little more off to be sure, and I would make your reports no wider than about 19.2 cm i.e. set the designer surface right edge about 19.2 or 19.3 cm wide.

     

    Almost forgot to mention - the bottom margin is set usually by trial and error, depending on if you have a footer defined or not and what printer/driver combo you're using. Start with .25 inches and see how you go. Adjust as necessary.

     

    Hope this helps,

    regards,

    rob

     

     

    Thursday, June 12, 2008 4:56 AM