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Licensing situation with internet facing website using sharepoint foundation

    Question

  • I'm considering using wss 4.0 for my internet facing website, with windows 2008, sql server 2008 standard on the same physical server. What is the licensing cost I'm looking at? Sifting through Microsoft's literature gave me a headache, yet no closer to an answer. Can anyone give a ballpark number, the way the total costs are added up, and the kind of licenses(processor, server, CAL, external connector etc.) for each components? Also, can I use sql server express with wss 4.0?
    Sunday, November 29, 2009 7:19 PM

Answers

  • SharePoint Foundation only requires Windows Server and if you want, SQL Server.  For Internet scenarios where you are authenticating (regardless of authentication method - AD, Forms, Claims, etc), you will need to buy a Windows Server External Connector.   SharePoint FIS allows both authenticated and anonymous.  If authenticated, you need a Windows Server External Connector on the servers as well.
    Interested in SharePoint Development? Check out Professional SharePoint 2010 Development - http://www.amazon.com/Professional-SharePoint-2010-Development-Programmer/dp/0470529423/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1283913528&sr=8-1
    Tuesday, November 09, 2010 2:50 AM

All replies

  • The licensing requirements for SPF 2010 (get in the habit of that - WSS 4.0 is no more) will be the same as for WSS 3.0.

    That is you will have to pay full price and licensing costs for the server(s) on which you run it and if you use a full copy of SQL Server 2008, the full licensing costs for the database system as well.

    In addition you will need the *server* Internet Connection license for all servers running SPF 2010 connected to the Internet (presumably the same ca 2K as before).

    As the Basic installation of SPF 2010 installs SQL Server 2008 Express, yes, it will run with SQL Server 2008 Express.
    FAQ sites: (SP 2010) http://wssv4faq.mindsharp.com; (v3) http://wssv3faq.mindsharp.com and (WSS 2.0) http://wssv2faq.mindsharp.com
    Complete Book Lists (incl. foreign language) on each site.
    Sunday, November 29, 2009 9:00 PM
  • *server* Internet Connection is in fact called "Windows Server External Connector". This license is assigned to server (physical HW system) and enables non-anonymous remote users acces to any Windows OS environment running on licensed server device.
    Monday, November 30, 2009 1:12 AM
  • Thanks for the reply. Besides external internet connector license, what kind of license do I need to get for win server and sql server, processor or server? I assume I don't need CAL.

    Monday, November 30, 2009 6:19 AM
  • 1x Windows Server 2008 Standard Server License
    Windows Server 2008 CAL licenses for each internal user
    1x Windows Server 2008 External Connector
    SQL Server 2008 Per Processor license for each physical processor (if running in physical system environment) or Per Processor license for each virtual processor (if running in virtual system environment). For mor details see Licensing Microsoft Server Products in Virtual Environments , Per-Processor Server Licensing Changes
    Monday, November 30, 2009 10:24 AM
  • You also should be able to install SharePoint Foundation 2010 on Windows Web Server 2008 R2.
    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2008/en/us/2008-web.aspx
    SharePoint Product Manager. Posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights
    Tuesday, December 01, 2009 3:54 AM
  • If I install sharepoint foundation 2010 on Windows Web server 2008, does that mean I don't need external connector license since web server is designed for external web services anyway?
    Tuesday, December 01, 2009 7:00 AM
  • No, you still need External Connector.
    And Web Server may only be used for front-end Web serving Internet-accessible Web pages, Web sites, Web applications, Web services, and POP3 mail serving. No "intranet" use, no data avaiable only for internal users.
    Tuesday, December 01, 2009 7:29 AM
  • Unfortunately I'm not super familar with the External Connector license. I did want to point out that the SharePoint Foundation 2010 licensing for a public web server is no different to the licensing that would be required to run an ASP.NET or any other web app on Windows.

    Regards,
    Paul


    SharePoint Product Manager. Posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights
    Tuesday, December 01, 2009 4:35 PM
  • I have query, I have license for Windows Web Server 2008 and I want to run small website based on SPF 2010, the below URL say the EC is not applicable for Windows Web Server 2008. now I am confused to invest OR not on EC License.

    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2008/en/us/external-connectors.aspx

    Can any one suggest me right option?

    Regards

    Venkat

    Thursday, July 01, 2010 7:56 AM
  • EC does not apply to Windows Web Server. So while using Web Server, there is no need to buy Windows Server External Connector license.
    Thursday, July 01, 2010 1:28 PM
  • I have some confusion over the licensing for

    SharePoint Server 2010 for Internet Sites, Enterprise

    On this page: http://sharepoint.microsoft.com/en-us/buy/Pages/Licensing-Details.aspx

    ...it says that " No CALs are required for users licensed through SharePoint Server 2010 for Internet Sites."

    If I want to use SharePoint for an extranet for external users, do I have to buy a CAL for each user? The extranet users would have to authenticate, and would have control over parts of the site to create content.

    Thanks in advance for your help, this stuff is driving me crazy and I can't get a straight answer from consultants because 2010 is all so new.

    - Thom

    Thursday, July 15, 2010 1:59 PM
  • No, you don't need a CAL for each user

    External users can have control over content or even create a content given the permission they have..  

    Thursday, September 30, 2010 12:08 AM
  • Using "Windows Server External Connector" on all servers publicly exposed with SharePoint Server 2010 for Internet Sites, Enterprise using an STS for Facebook, LinkedIn, Live ID, or any custom Trusted Indentity Provider does not require a SharePoint Standard & Enterprise User CAL?   This does not sound correct

    Will the internal SharePoint application servers also require "Windows Server External Connector" or just the Web Front ends, and do all SharePoint Servers within the farm must be licensed using SharePoint Server 2010 FIS?

    I believe SharePoint Server 2010 FIS only allows anonymoius access to sites; since Microsoft has no way to count these users, but all authenticated user require a CAL (and Enterprise too boot) since these can be counted.

    How would this work using ADFS to make thing more interesting?

    Friday, October 01, 2010 10:25 AM
  • Literally from the Microsoft Press book "Microsoft SharePoint 2010 Administrator's Companion (by Bill English, Brian Alderman, Mark Ferraz)" page 4:
    ...
    SFS is free and requires neither Client Access Licenses (CAL), a server license or, if utilized on the internet, an Internet connector license.
    ...

    Reading this the only software that one should buy is a Windows Server 2008 (R2) license and a SQL Server 2008 (R2) license?

    Can someone (from Microsoft) confirm this?
    Thanks
    Monday, November 08, 2010 10:05 PM
  • SharePoint Foundation only requires Windows Server and if you want, SQL Server.  For Internet scenarios where you are authenticating (regardless of authentication method - AD, Forms, Claims, etc), you will need to buy a Windows Server External Connector.   SharePoint FIS allows both authenticated and anonymous.  If authenticated, you need a Windows Server External Connector on the servers as well.
    Interested in SharePoint Development? Check out Professional SharePoint 2010 Development - http://www.amazon.com/Professional-SharePoint-2010-Development-Programmer/dp/0470529423/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1283913528&sr=8-1
    Tuesday, November 09, 2010 2:50 AM
  • Thanks for confirming this, Tom.

    Like GuyD I saw the quote from the Administrator's Companion book and thought "that can't be right". (That you don't need the Server External Connector)

    Mind you that part of the book was full of inaccuracies (fairly typical when SharePoint Server people are talking about SharePoint Foundation) such as the use there of "SFS" (see extract) for what they call in full "SharePoint Foundation Services". Something I blogged about as soon as I saw it.


    2010 Books: SPF 2010; SPS 2010; SPD 2010; InfoPath 2010; Workflow etc.
    2007 Books: WSS 3.0; MOSS 2007; SPD 2007; InfoPath 2007; PerformancePoint; SSRS; Workflow
    Both lists also include books in French; German; Spanish with even more languages in the 2007 list.
    Tuesday, November 09, 2010 3:06 AM
  • Ok thanks.

    Some additional questions:
    - In what price-range (approximately) is a Windows Server External Connector?
    - Is this an extra piece of software that must be installed (or is already installed as part of Windows 2008 (R2) ) and should only be licensed ?
    - I suppose one need this Windows Server External Connector too for 'classic' ASP.NET web applications that are open for the public (Internet facing)?
    - When using Windows 2008 Web Server edition one need not to buy this external connector license for public facing 'classic' ASP.NET web applications?

    Guy

    Tuesday, November 09, 2010 6:36 AM
  •  

    So is this the recipe for the cheapest public facing SharePoint site that allows forms authentication?

     

    * Windows Web Server 2008 R2: Official price $469 and no Server External Connector or CALs for external users required.

    * SPF 2010: Free

    * SQL Server 2008 Express R2 running on the same server: Free.

     

    Saturday, December 04, 2010 10:28 PM
  • > So is this the recipe for the cheapest public facing SharePoint site that allows forms authentication?

    > * Windows Web Server 2008 R2:  etc.

    Unless things have changed for the 2010 products (and odder things have happened) then you can't run SPF 2010 on the Web Server version of Windows *as a single server "farm"*.  (Possibly "can't run" means licensing doesn't allow it / possibly you just can't)

    It always used to be that the earlier products (WSS 2.0 / 3.0) in the same "free" series would require for the SQL Server part to be on a separate server if the Web Edition of Windows was used for the SharePoint product.

    It seems logical that this is still the same (because otherwise MS make hardly any money at all) but hopefully Tom Rizzo or someone else from MS in the know would confirm this.

    The earlier quote from Tom Rizzo was "SharePoint Foundation only requires Windows Server" which I took to mean "real" Server not Web Edition and he also went on to say that "you will need to buy a Windows Server External Connector" if you are authenticating, which would seem to confirm that.


    SP 2010 "FAQ" (mainly useful links): http://wssv4faq.mindsharp.com/default.aspx
    WSS3/MOSS FAQ (FAQ and Links) http://wssv3faq.mindsharp.com/default.aspx
    Both also have links to extensive book lists and to (free) on-line chapters

    Sunday, December 05, 2010 8:26 AM
  • This http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en/sharepoint2010setup/thread/536c458b-a688-4d25-9dba-d96e5cb36ea2 thread mentioned that it should be possible to install SPF on Windows Server R2 Web Edition both as a WFE as well as in a single-server farm. Is SQL Server 2008 R2 Web Edition also supported in that case?

    As already mentioned by Mike can someone from Microsoft confirm this?

    Thanks.

    Guy

     

     

    Sunday, December 05, 2010 8:45 AM
  • Tom -

    One of the common questions is which servers do you need the Windows External Connector on.  For example, let's say you have 2 WFEs, 1 app server, 2 node active passive SQL cluster and 2 DCs in your DMZ.  You are using AD for user accounts.  Which of these servers require the Windows Server EC?  All of them or only the WFEs?

    I recieved a Microsoft brief from our VAR titled "Microsoft SharePoint Server 2010 for Internet Sites", September 2010 edition which contained some great information on SharePoint licensing, but it did not touch on the supporting system licensing requirements (SQL and AD specifically).  For example, it should note that if you are using the FIS license, you would also have to use CPU based licensing for SQL. 

    http://download.microsoft.com/download/3/D/4/3D42BDC2-6725-4B29-B75A-A5B04179958B/Licensing_SharePoint_for_Internet_Sites.docx

    It would be great to add some more details to that doc as this topic is always confusing.  The more scenarios, the better.

    Another question that I had was if you had 1 farm with 4 WFEs, two in your DMZ providing content to your extranet users and 2 in your private network providing content to your intranet users, would you have to get the FIS license for all 4 WFEs?  What about application servers?

    Thank you for your guidance and for an awesome product!!

    Dan

    Tuesday, January 04, 2011 10:54 PM
  • Windows External Connector would be required on all server used by the Externally Authenticated Users which includes all WFE & SQL for sure, but then gets very gray when using an Enterprise Application Farm for BCS, Search, User Profile Service, or Authoring & Publishing Farms. I would have to guess it is needed here as well, so simply every server needs the extra $2000.00 in licensing.

    What does the $2000.00 get is a different question, if using Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise 4 OSEs are licensed, but does that mean you need to spend $10000.00 to license the (EC) on the HOST OS & 4 GUEST OSEs?  What does it cost if hosting 20 GUEST OSEs ($42000.00).

    There was a day when IIS was a Core Service and cost nothing more than the OS to run it; simpler times!!!

    Wednesday, January 05, 2011 2:08 PM
  • > Windows External Connector would be required on all server used by the Externally Authenticated Users which includes all WFE & SQL for sure,

    All WFE for sure, but I'm not at all sure that you need it for the SQL because it's only being accessed via the WFEs. (Yes I know the same argument doesn't applies to SharePoint CALs where people have tried and failed with the argument that the SQL Server is only being accessed by one "user" = the SP server)

    This sort of thing is the reason why once having collected a lot of opinions to give a general ball park figure it's essential to contact a Microsoft Licensing Specialist and get what he/she says in writing.

     


    SP 2010 "FAQ" (mainly useful links): http://wssv4faq.mindsharp.com/default.aspx
    WSS3/MOSS FAQ (FAQ and Links) http://wssv3faq.mindsharp.com/default.aspx
    Both also have links to extensive book lists and to (free) on-line chapters
    Wednesday, January 05, 2011 2:17 PM
  • Just came up on this discussion and i see you need an external connector for external users like vendors that authenticate using FBA & SQL.

    Now i was in contact with an Licensing Employee from Microsoft yesterday and he told the following:

    • License for Windows Server 2008
    • If the licensing internally is correct you do not need any other CAL license (all the users are already licensed)
    • External users only need an extra CAL license if they are authenticated
    • The External Connector is only needed for large enviroments where this will be cheaper then like 500 extra CALs for the external users.

    Can some one confirm this? I'm getting very confused at this moment.

    Friday, April 01, 2011 7:12 AM
  • > Just came up on this discussion and i see you need an external connector for external users like vendors that authenticate using FBA & SQL.

    > The External Connector is only needed for large enviroments where this will be cheaper then like 500 extra CALs for the external users.

    The very first thing to note is that this thread was about SPF 2010 which has no CAL requirements and which also does not have any Internet license requirements beyond the server internet connector.

    You were probably asking about SPS 2010 which does have CAL requirements.

    The reply you got is probably saying that you do not need an Internet Connection License for **SPS 2010** if you have CALs for all your External users. You will still however need the *server* Internet Connection license.

    The comment about the External connector being cheaper than CALs for more than 500 users could not possibly apply to the *server* Internet Connector license as that costs ca 2K (a few years old figure but it won't have gone up that much) and in any case is still needed even if all external users have SharePoint CALs.

    So that comment is clearly about the Internet connnection license for SPS 2010 which for MOSS 2007 cost something like 35K which might be where his 500 users with CALs come in but then imo they would be rather cheap CALs and probably only for the Standard edition.

    [Note: If you have standard edition installed you need standard CALs but if you have ent edition installed then users using ent edition functions need both Std and Ent Cals which ca. doubles the CALs cost - and this naturally would apply to external CAL-based users too.]

    Typically you will want to have a mix of External users with CALs and named External users without CALs and that would still mean you would need the server internet connection license for the external users without CALs so the most common thing is to have only a SPS 2010 Internet Connector license (always in addition to the External Connector license for the server).  I would put the break-even point for all external users having CALs to be much less than 500 - but check the current prices and note that you are more flexible if you have the Internet connection license because your additional cost for extra named External users is zero in that case.

    Finally:

    This "If the licensing internally is correct you do not need any other CAL license (all the users are already licensed) " is very confusing.

    Even if all Internal users specifically have the correct (Std or Std+Ent) *SharePoint* CALs then you will still need something extra for external users (the choice was explained above).

    I hope this helps. Lots of normal MS people do not know the exact SP 2010 licensing details so you should always contact a *licensing specialist* in order to get the full information. Take such information in writing in case they too get it wrong (unlikely) and you later get complaints that you are not correctly licensed.

    Treat any comment you get in the forums with care (including this one).

     

     P.S. I've just seen that you got the quoted information from a licensing specialist. My comments are still valid I think - I would get his opinion again in writing (which might make him tighten up the language) and if he won't agree to that, try to contact a  licensing specialist specifically for SharePoint which might mean going to the regional rather than the local office.


    SP 2010 "FAQ" (mainly useful links): http://wssv4faq.mindsharp.com/default.aspx
    WSS3/MOSS FAQ (FAQ and Links) http://wssv3faq.mindsharp.com/default.aspx
    Both also have links to extensive book lists and to (free) on-line chapters





    Friday, April 01, 2011 7:59 AM
  • Hi Mike,

    This is also about SPF (Foundation 2010). This was told to me by chat from a Microsoft License Employee in the Netherlands. At this moment i'm totally confused what license i would need.

    Friday, April 01, 2011 9:00 AM
  • If it's about SPF 2010 then all the talk of CALs from your "licensing specialist" was nonsense (either that or he wasn't talking about SharePoint CALs). There has never been a CAL requirement for STS / WSS 2.0 / WSS 3.0 / SPF 2010.

    Clearly you need to talk to someone else or at the very least make it clear to this guy that you do not want licensing information for SPS 2010.

    Earlier posts in this thread have the SPF 2010 details. I'll repeat the basics here

    1. SPF 2010 (free)

    2. Runs on one or more servers (more typically when one is for the databases). These servers need some form of licensing.

    3. If you don't use the in-built database system (only possible in a single-server installation) then your SQL Server needs to be licensed.

    Typically the server and the SQL Server licensing needs *might* be already covered by licenses you already hold.

    4. If connected to the Internet the server needs an External Connector License (the name might be that or something close to that)

    There are no SharePoint CAL requirements for external users - named or anonymous. There are no SharePoint CAL requirements for internal customers. There is no SharePoint Internet connection license requirement.

    Mike

    But check the earlier posts especially the one from Tom Rizzo who is a very knowledgable MS guy in the SharePoint team.

     


    SP 2010 "FAQ" (mainly useful links): http://wssv4faq.mindsharp.com/default.aspx
    WSS3/MOSS FAQ (FAQ and Links) http://wssv3faq.mindsharp.com/default.aspx
    Both also have links to extensive book lists and to (free) on-line chapters


    Friday, April 01, 2011 9:27 AM
  • Today i did send an e-mail to microsoft regarding this question. A few hours later i got this response (Only for SharePoint Foundation).

    1. If you use SharePoint Foundation with SQL Express you only need extra CALs for the people that are using the SharePoint, so the people that authenticate. This is not a public website that is visible for just anyone.

    2. If you use SharePoint Foundation with SQL Express you can also buy an External Connector for the Windows Servers. Then you don't need a CAL but only the connector (in sites that have a large amount of users this could be cheaper then a CAL per user/device).

    3. If you use SharePoint Foundation with SQL other then the Express edition then you also need CALs for the SQL Server. You can choose between a license for the processor or the Server license in combination with User/Device CALs

    This is what i got from a license expert at Microsoft.

    • Proposed as answer by MULTISY Monday, April 04, 2011 11:40 AM
    Monday, April 04, 2011 11:11 AM
  • Special note:  Item 1. will not apply when using FBA or CBA authentication, since these CALs are only for Windows users authenticating against Active Directory.

    When using Claims Based Authentication (CBA) the only option will be the External Connector for Windows Servers, assuming the user store is in the Cloud (i.e. LinkedIn, Facebook).



    • Edited by MULTISY Monday, April 04, 2011 11:54 AM Typo
    Monday, April 04, 2011 11:50 AM
  • > 1. If you use SharePoint Foundation with SQL Express you only need extra CALs for the people that are using the SharePoint, so the people that authenticate. This is not a public website that is visible for just anyone.

    I remain convinced that this is either

    a) talking about SharePoint CALs - in which case it is 100% incorrect as SPF 2010 users never need (SharePoint) CALs.

    [The answer would be valid for SPS 2010 because that product does require SharePoint CALs.]

    OR

    b) talking about Server CALs

     

    Unfortunately the SPF 2010 product is something that many Microsoft people don't really seem to be aware of. If you ever attend a Microsoft presentation of SharePoint you can almost be bound to see many functions demonstrated that are only available in the SPS 2010 *Enterprise* Edition yet this fact is hardly ever mentioned so people are then surprised when having bought a lesser version they don't get all the functions. Similarly it seems that this particular licensing person is well informed (if inexact in his descriptions) of the SPS 2010 licensing situation - which is admittedly the more complicated - but doesn't seem to have a clue about the SPF 2010 licensing situation. It's all very understandable because only the SPS 2010 product brings Microsoft a lot of revenue but it is still a problem for anyone trying hard to get information about SPF 2010.

    Mike (ex STS; WSS MVP and so I've lived with this "virtually unknown at Microsoft" almost-free SharePoint product range business since 2001)

     Note that points 2 and 3 seem to be correct for SPF 2010!  (Apart that is from the part in brackets which is still wrong if it is talking about *SharePoint* CALs)

    -----------------------------------

    I would send them a reply back asking them which reference in their post to CALs is for Server CALs, which for SharePoint CALs and which for SQL CALs. The latter are no doubt those in 3. But for the CALs in 1. or 2. it is very unclear which kind of CALs are meant.


    SP 2010 "FAQ" (mainly useful links): http://wssv4faq.mindsharp.com/default.aspx
    WSS3/MOSS FAQ (FAQ and Links) http://wssv3faq.mindsharp.com/default.aspx
    Both also have links to extensive book lists and to (free) on-line chapters
    Monday, April 04, 2011 11:59 AM
  • > I would send them a reply back asking them which reference in their post to CALs is for Server CALs, which for SharePoint CALs and which for SQL CALs. The latter are no doubt those in 3. But for the CALs in 1. or 2. it is very unclear which kind of CALs are meant.


    It are Server CALs, no sharepoint cals. And for the SQL (if no Express is used) this are CALs for the SQL server, this could be a Processor Cal or a Server License with User/Device CALs.

    I'm also replying to the fact that Multisy is telling us if using CLAIMs you need the external connector.

    Tuesday, April 05, 2011 2:14 PM
  • > It are Server CALs, no sharepoint cals.

    Good that means I'm on the same page as him (or he with me).

    All the problems stem from the fact that for me in a question about SharePoint licensing when CALs are mentioned I immediately think *SharePoint* CALs. A bit more specific text in the original Microsoft reply you quoted and we would never have had this extended conversation about it.

    (Partially) mea cupla.

    Mike

     


    SP 2010 "FAQ" (mainly useful links): http://wssv4faq.mindsharp.com/default.aspx
    WSS3/MOSS FAQ (FAQ and Links) http://wssv3faq.mindsharp.com/default.aspx
    Both also have links to extensive book lists and to (free) on-line chapters
    Tuesday, April 05, 2011 2:26 PM
  • Using SharePoint Foundation (SPF), still uses Windows Server CALs and SQL CALs; (which are also bundled into the Core CAL).

    SQL licensing is simple when in doubt, use per CPU CALs and be safe.  Windows Server Datacenter is licensing per CPU, but SharePoint does not need to use Active Directory, but in this case (for Windows Server 2008 R2) still needs the External Connector for Windows Server on all servers in the SharePoint Farm.

    SharePoint CALs when using SharePoint 2010 for Internet Sites (FIS) is by far the most confusing licensing ever concocted, because FIS does not preclude requiring SharePoint Enterprise CALs (Standard CALs not allowed) like the simple licensing SQL per CPU uses.  Why is that?  When Microsoft  hit $1 billion in CAL sales in 2008 how many unique users is that; since every deployment of SharePoint must license everyone; each of us must already have a handful or more CALs dedicated to our use; how fair is that?.


    • Edited by MULTISY Tuesday, April 05, 2011 3:25 PM Typo
    Tuesday, April 05, 2011 3:23 PM
  • I don't think this

    > SharePoint CALs when using SharePoint 2010 for Internet Sites (FIS) is by far the most confusing licensing ever concocted, because FIS does not preclude requiring SharePoint Enterprise CALs (Standard CALs not allowed)

    is right.

    1. Every time Enterprise CALs are needed, standard CALs will be needed as well.

    (Yes, you are correct that FIS provides Enterprise level functionality)

    2. FIS means that people accessing from the Internet don't need CALs, the only people who need CALs will be the few (because of the restrictions of using FIS for internal use, there will typically only be a few - i.e. Administrators and developers - inside the company) people inside the company who aren't otherwise licensed for it.

    ---------------------

    But we're both giving our opinions here. There once were MS people from the SP 2010 team in this thread. Where are they now?

     

    Mike

     

     

     


    SP 2010 "FAQ" (mainly useful links): http://wssv4faq.mindsharp.com/default.aspx
    WSS3/MOSS FAQ (FAQ and Links) http://wssv3faq.mindsharp.com/default.aspx
    Both also have links to extensive book lists and to (free) on-line chapters
    Tuesday, April 05, 2011 4:16 PM
  • FIS means that people accessing from the Internet don't need CALs, this is only correct when they are Anonymous.

    External Connector CALs are required when Features of SharePoint are exposed to Authenticated external users.  This is where the beautiful CBA and SharePoint licensing collide making SharePoint Server (not Foundation) just to costly.

    If this is not the case where in the Product Use Rights for SharePoint FIS are the external user granted the use of the SharePoint Features & Services without a CAL.  It is the Enterprise CAL Product Use Right which allows this; therefore, also required when using SharePoint FIS at additional cost. 



    • Edited by MULTISY Tuesday, April 05, 2011 9:42 PM Typo
    Tuesday, April 05, 2011 5:26 PM
  • MULTISY, can you explain if I need an External connector if i use the following setup? SharePoint Foundation with SQL Express (on the same box) and 2 SharePoint sites, 1 for internal users (the intranet) and 1 for external users that authenticate through FBA. Those external users are know people from partner company's. The extranet is only visible to these authenticated users, so no anonymous access to the extranet or the intranet site.
    Wednesday, April 06, 2011 5:59 AM
  • It's Mulitsy's question but the external connector license is only ca 2K anyway (so this is a lot of fuss about nothing much) and is always needed if the server is connected to the Internet irrespective of what it is connected for.

    (Looking forward to Multisy's take - like I wrote we need a MS product team member here!)

    Mike


    SP 2010 "FAQ" (mainly useful links): http://wssv4faq.mindsharp.com/default.aspx
    WSS3/MOSS FAQ (FAQ and Links) http://wssv3faq.mindsharp.com/default.aspx
    Both also have links to extensive book lists and to (free) on-line chapters
    Wednesday, April 06, 2011 6:07 AM
  • Found the following on Microsoft site, there it tells me i dont need EC?

    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsserver2008/en/us/external-connectors.aspx


    Got some new information, from a license expert at Microsoft.

    In case you have a SharePoint Foundation 2010 with SQL Express and Windows Server 2008 setup, you will need the following licenses:

    • Windows Server 2008 License
    • SQL Express is free so no license needed
    • SharePoint Foundation is free, no license needed
    • For internal users you will need Windows Server CAL's, so no SharePoint CAL's
    • For external users (authenticating FBA or Active Directory) need Windows Server CAL's OR the Windows Server External Connector

    In case you have a SharePoint Server 2010 with SQL Express and Windows Server 2008 setup, you will need the following licenses:

    • Windows Server 2008 License
    • SQL Express is free so no license needed
    • Sharepoint Server 2010 License
    • For Internal users you need the Windows Server CAL's and SharePoint CAL's
    • For External users you can choose between Windows Server CAL's or a Windows Server External Connector
    • Besides the above external license you also need to license the external users with SharePoint CAL's
    • Edited by Bram vd Kerkhof Wednesday, April 06, 2011 8:45 AM license information from microsoft
    Wednesday, April 06, 2011 7:18 AM
  • With the FBA database in SQL Express and SharePoint Foundation Databases in SQL Express no cost here except for the Windows Server license.  SQL Express has a 4GB limit.

    Each internal user that authenticates will need a Windows Server CAL, (but they should already have that being in AD)

    If only one external user autheticates using (Windows Server 2008 R2) then the $2000  Windows Server External connector is required.  Using Windows Server 2008 and below have a Windows Server External Connector CAL which most likely are not available any more.  This was a stelthly change made by Microsoft to Windows Server 2008 R2 Product Use Rights, and know of no external CALs for R2.  If they are avialable then you need to figure the number of users before exceeding $2000.  My guess when WSS v3 allowed FBA users they needed to plug a revenue hole; considering now SharePoint v4 allows CBA; it is easier for authenticated external user to access SharePoint with little effort.

    I would suggest spending the $2000, and consider Claim-Based Authentication using a third party user store like Facebook or LinkedIn, to realize the full benefits of SharePoint v4.


    • Edited by MULTISY Wednesday, April 06, 2011 12:11 PM Typo
    Wednesday, April 06, 2011 12:10 PM
  • > My guess when WSS v3 allowed FBA users they needed to plug a revenue hole.

    > This was a stelthly change made by Microsoft to Windows Server 2008 R2 Product Use Rights

    There was an external connector license for the server for WSS 3.0 too. It then (2007) naturally applied to Windows Server 2003 which was what most people used WSS 3.0 on at the beginning. This isn't something MS has added for SPF 2010 / Server 2008 R2 because they are running out of money!


    SP 2010 "FAQ" (mainly useful links): http://wssv4faq.mindsharp.com/default.aspx
    WSS3/MOSS FAQ (FAQ and Links) http://wssv3faq.mindsharp.com/default.aspx
    Both also have links to extensive book lists and to (free) on-line chapters
    Wednesday, April 06, 2011 12:55 PM
  • I dont know if the Windows Web server 2008 question was definitively answered. You can only do a "basic" or Standalone install using that server, it MAY NOT server a wfe role in a farm.

    Friday, July 22, 2011 8:56 PM
  • Sorry, but it is not true. You can definitely install SharePoint 2010 (Foundation or Server) on Windows Web Server 2008 OS as WFE.

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc262485.aspx#section4

    I tried it my self, it works.


    Kamil Jurik SharePoint Server MVP WBI Systems a.s.
    Saturday, July 23, 2011 10:08 AM
  • WSS and SPF2010 can be freely downloaded.So why a license cost is involved?
    Wednesday, November 16, 2011 1:37 PM
  • No licensing cost for the SharePoint portion, but you will need to license the OS & SQL.

    With Windows Server 2008 and earlier IIS was part of the Core services, so using FBA in WSS allowed the use of the OS for free.  Using AD accounts in WSS is not free.

    Using Windows Server 2008 R2, IIS will require an External Connector $2000 for each server used by SharePoint (including SQL server), if a single external user connects to SharePoint.  It is assumed that internal user already have their OS CAL.

    Using SQL Express is free, otherwise use SQL CPU License model; SQL CALs does not work for external users.

    I have been unable to get Microsoft to quote the incremental cost of external users connecting to SPF2010 using ADFS v2.0; because this is the AD service this most likely will incur an OS cost for sure, unless using maybe Datacenter OS version; but that will cost big per CPU.

    The cheapest route is using SharePoint (either version) in Windows Server 2008 /w SQL Express on a single server.  This will cost you one Windows Server 2008 license; nothing is free.

    Hope that helps

    Wednesday, November 16, 2011 2:28 PM