none
Is it possible to convert a 32-bit Microsoft Access file to 64-bit?

    Question

  • Access application developed in 32-bit environment won't open in Access 2010 64-bit? Is it possible to convert a 32-bit Microsoft Access file to 64-bit?
    Tuesday, March 22, 2011 9:36 PM

Answers

  • AFAIK, there aren't any true 64-bit Access at the moment. Access 2010 is not a true 64-bit application from what I gethered (IMO). 2010 is very likely working in a 64-bit OS environment in some sort of emulation mode, maybe in part of a program. If you program your code in Access2010 32-bit and move it to Access2010 64-bit, it should work. Except for the datatypes which you need to change. Look here for this
    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee691831.aspx

    The above link are the things you're likely to change in order to get it to work in 64-bit.

    Qoute:
    The Microsoft Office 2010 system is available in both 32-bit and 64-bit versions. The 64-bit version enables you to work with much larger sets of data. This need is especially true when working with large numbers in Microsoft Excel 2010.

    It seems Excel would benefit when using large data set. Nothing special for Access I guess.


    • Marked as answer by Bruce Song Monday, April 04, 2011 1:31 AM
    Wednesday, March 23, 2011 1:15 AM
  • @AccessVandal,

    uhm, sorry to say this, but you're just plain wrong here. There is a truely 64-bit version of MS Access and the Access Database (ACE) Engine (it is a part of the reason for the breaking changes in the ADODB library that accompanied Windows 7 SP1).

    They run natively in a 64-bit address space. unfortunately for 64-bit Access the 64-bit engine works with exactly the same database file format as the 32-bit version (i.e. the same Databse files - no enhancements in capabilities or capactities to be found there).

    32-bit version of Office and Access also run in 64-bit Windows in a WOW (Windows-On-Windows) 32-bit-hosted-in-64-bit execution environment.

    @Wilsonn61 While there is no "64-bit Access Database" per-se, there are some potential changes needed to run an existing 32-bit Access application in a 64-bit edition of Office 2010. The determinants for those changes are highly specific to the application (and whatever external DLLs or ActiveX controls/libraties it may reference) as well as the particular neture of the application's requirements. I know that this doesn't give you perhaps the answer you were looking for, but the fact is that there are just a large number of variables to take into account, and I know of no automated means of accomplishing all that.

     


    Mark Burns, MCAD, MCP
    Sr. Microsoft Access Analyst/Developer
    Manager LinkedIn.Com community: Professional Microsoft Access Developers Network (PMADN)
    • Marked as answer by Bruce Song Monday, April 04, 2011 1:31 AM
    Wednesday, March 23, 2011 2:03 AM
  • Is the application compiled?  If it is not compiled open the database in Access x64 without starting the application (i.e. hold the shift key down).  Press ctrl-g and then check the references to see which ones are broken (missing).

    There are a large number of ActiveX controls that are available to x32 Acess that were not ported to x64.

    • Marked as answer by Bruce Song Monday, April 04, 2011 1:31 AM
    Wednesday, March 23, 2011 3:06 AM

All replies

  • I don't believe there is such a thing as an 64-bit Access file, just as there's no 64-bit Excel file or 64-bit Word file.

    What problem are you encountering when you try to open it?


    Doug Steele, Microsoft Access MVP
    http://www.AccessMVP.com/djsteele (no e-mails, please!)
    Co-author Access Solutions — Tips, Tricks, and Secrets from Microsoft Access MVPs (ISBN 978-0-470-59168-0)
    Tuesday, March 22, 2011 10:36 PM
  • AFAIK, there aren't any true 64-bit Access at the moment. Access 2010 is not a true 64-bit application from what I gethered (IMO). 2010 is very likely working in a 64-bit OS environment in some sort of emulation mode, maybe in part of a program. If you program your code in Access2010 32-bit and move it to Access2010 64-bit, it should work. Except for the datatypes which you need to change. Look here for this
    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee691831.aspx

    The above link are the things you're likely to change in order to get it to work in 64-bit.

    Qoute:
    The Microsoft Office 2010 system is available in both 32-bit and 64-bit versions. The 64-bit version enables you to work with much larger sets of data. This need is especially true when working with large numbers in Microsoft Excel 2010.

    It seems Excel would benefit when using large data set. Nothing special for Access I guess.


    • Marked as answer by Bruce Song Monday, April 04, 2011 1:31 AM
    Wednesday, March 23, 2011 1:15 AM
  • @AccessVandal,

    uhm, sorry to say this, but you're just plain wrong here. There is a truely 64-bit version of MS Access and the Access Database (ACE) Engine (it is a part of the reason for the breaking changes in the ADODB library that accompanied Windows 7 SP1).

    They run natively in a 64-bit address space. unfortunately for 64-bit Access the 64-bit engine works with exactly the same database file format as the 32-bit version (i.e. the same Databse files - no enhancements in capabilities or capactities to be found there).

    32-bit version of Office and Access also run in 64-bit Windows in a WOW (Windows-On-Windows) 32-bit-hosted-in-64-bit execution environment.

    @Wilsonn61 While there is no "64-bit Access Database" per-se, there are some potential changes needed to run an existing 32-bit Access application in a 64-bit edition of Office 2010. The determinants for those changes are highly specific to the application (and whatever external DLLs or ActiveX controls/libraties it may reference) as well as the particular neture of the application's requirements. I know that this doesn't give you perhaps the answer you were looking for, but the fact is that there are just a large number of variables to take into account, and I know of no automated means of accomplishing all that.

     


    Mark Burns, MCAD, MCP
    Sr. Microsoft Access Analyst/Developer
    Manager LinkedIn.Com community: Professional Microsoft Access Developers Network (PMADN)
    • Marked as answer by Bruce Song Monday, April 04, 2011 1:31 AM
    Wednesday, March 23, 2011 2:03 AM
  • Well Mark,

    I would agree with you, it just that I'm sceptical.

    Wednesday, March 23, 2011 2:29 AM
  • Is the application compiled?  If it is not compiled open the database in Access x64 without starting the application (i.e. hold the shift key down).  Press ctrl-g and then check the references to see which ones are broken (missing).

    There are a large number of ActiveX controls that are available to x32 Acess that were not ported to x64.

    • Marked as answer by Bruce Song Monday, April 04, 2011 1:31 AM
    Wednesday, March 23, 2011 3:06 AM
  • Some of the VBA 64-bit differences are discussed here: http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/visio-help/HV080353309.aspx
    -Tom. Microsoft Access MVP
    Wednesday, March 23, 2011 4:03 AM
  • http://www.slyman.org/blog/2010/11/64-bit-windows-7office-2010-migration-experiences/

    More details on the differences between 32-bit and 64-bit Access (including a few helpful links to specific resources regarding how to upgrade VBA for 64-bit). In accordance with AccessVandal's remarks, I found experimentally that Access 2010 64-bit has a 2GB file limit (in common with the 32-bit version of the same software), even when running from NTFS on big empty hard drives under 64-bit Windows 7.


    Matthew Slyman M.A. (Camb.)
    Wednesday, June 22, 2011 10:09 AM
  • I found experimentally that Access 2010 64-bit has a 2GB file limit (in common with the 32-bit version of the same software), even when running from NTFS on big empty hard drives under 64-bit Windows 7.

    Frankly it is a known fact. I even saw somewhere in MS site/presentation/whitepaper such words:

    "You can try Office x64 only if you need to manage large Excel spreadsheets".


    Andrey V Artemyev | Saint-Petersburg, Russia
    Wednesday, June 22, 2011 10:15 AM
  • As pointed out correctly by Saberman, if you create a accDE with the 64 bit version of Access, it will ONLY work with the 64 bit version. The same goes for the 32 bit version, it will ONLY work with the 32 bit version of Access.

    So, in fact, 32 or 64 bit editions of code does exist when you compile the application.

    This rule ONLY applies to a ACCDE file. If you NOT using a ACCDE file, but a ACCDB file, then 32 or 64 bit version of Access should not matter, the only exception being if you call windows API, then that code has to be changed.

    However, the application + data can still be opened with either version if you talking about ACCDB.

    So, if you not talking about a ACCDE file, then 32 or 64 should not matter here and there is no need to convert.

    Albert D. Kallal  (Access MVP)
    Edmonton, Alberta Canada


    Thursday, June 23, 2011 11:47 PM
  • Tom, that link just goes to a page on SelLength.
    Jeanette Cunningham
    Friday, June 24, 2011 12:10 AM
  • I've have not been able to open a 64 bit .mdb file, created in Access 2007. Is it possible to convert this to the 2010 format? I can open the same file in Access 2010 32 bits, with no issues. But when I try to open the same file in Access 2010 64 bits, i get the error, that the file is in use by another application, which off course is not true.
    Sunday, March 11, 2012 6:56 AM
  • Hi, I've been able to save it in the .accdb format. But its still 32 bits. I'll try to open it in the 64 bit version of Access 2010 and let u know the results.
    Sunday, March 11, 2012 7:02 AM
  • It may not be a 32 - 64 bit issue.  If the file was compiled under Access with SP1 it will not open on a version without SP1 (and possibly the reverse as well).

    /Joe

    Sunday, March 11, 2012 9:02 AM
  • Are you sure? I don't seem to have had that problem (I haven't noticed any incompatibility between 2010 and 2010 SP1), working with Access 2010 32-bit / 64-bit and full vs. RunTime; though I have had trouble with differences between 2007 and 2010...

    Matthew Slyman M.A. (Camb.)

    Monday, March 12, 2012 8:15 AM
  • http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2533794 Due to this I had to slipstream SP1 into my runtime distribution for my clients.

    /Joe

    Sunday, March 18, 2012 8:21 AM
  • http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2533794 Due to this I had to slipstream SP1 into my runtime distribution for my clients.

    You actually included an OS Service Pack in a Runtime Access application?  Why didn't you just compile the application on a Windows 7 machine without SP1 or on an XP VM?

    Did it ever occur to you that one of your clients might have a reason for not installing Windows 7 SP1?


    http://www.saberman.com

    Sunday, March 18, 2012 8:09 PM
  • Saberman,

    To clarify, I'm not talking about Win7SP1. I'm talking about Access 2010 SP1. The issue is whether A2010 has the AccessSP or not.

    I took the Access2010 runtime redistributable from the MS website and slipstreamed the A2010 service pack into the installation. It works perfectly and the only annoyance is that I can't figure out how to repack the files into a single file.

    My solution is to use Inno Installer to complete the packaging.  This also allows me to include the x86 & x64 runtime on the CD and offer the end-user a choice appropriate for the workstation. (Now if you happen to know how to get Inno to check if the installation of Office on the computer is x86 or x64 that would be helpful but for now I'm not getting bent out of shape about an extra mouse click.)

    See also an older thread where I found a way to save a user click on the runtime EULA and got chastised by Doug Steele: http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/accessdev/thread/a4605804-8e8a-4467-8d4b-59f2cfcb717f 

    If you know how to either repack the runtime files after slipstreaming or to get Inno to check the Office 32-64 bit version, I'd be most appreciative.

    /Joe

    Monday, March 19, 2012 8:10 AM
  • If the client has databases compiled without Access 2010 SP1 they might not work after SP1 is applied per the KB article.


    http://www.saberman.com

    Monday, March 19, 2012 11:46 PM
  • If the client has databases compiled without Access 2010 SP1 they might not work after SP1 is applied per the KB article.


    http://www.saberman.com

    True. My thinking is that given that MS service pack are distributed via Windows Updates and most users just update everything, we are better off assuming the user runs A2010 with SP1 than without.

    Thoughts?

    /Joe

    Tuesday, March 20, 2012 11:04 AM