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Microsoft Access and Ipad

    Question

  • I heard that Microsoft Access can run quite smoothly on an Ipad, is it true? And let's say that I have a database with many functions, do they have limitations or the database will run normally?

    If it is possible, what would be the best setup, meaning do we know of a particular model or prooven software out there to insure that the database is working properly?

    Thank you


    Claude Larocque
    Saturday, April 09, 2011 11:35 PM

Answers

  • Good evening gentlemen,

    My aplication as you know Andrey is a electronic cash register that does not only the regular work of a cash register, but also, handle all the accounting tasks behind the scene as well as inventory, purchases and marketing.

    The idea of Ipad was just for the restauration part of Auto-Caisse to enable waiters and waitresses to take orders using that device, but many devices can be use for that purpose, so I do not stress over that.

    As to put my application on the web, I am studying Windows Azure and I can see it run using that media. I have already begun the web compatibility and it's not that bad, I am struggling with some macros and code but it's taking place slowly but surely.

    I read carefully the comments of Albert and I understand perfectly how it's work now...

    Thanks Albert.

    Take care Andrey

    I put a new discussion on a small problem, if you want to look at it, you might know the answer.

    Claude

     


    Claude Larocque
    Tuesday, April 12, 2011 2:30 AM

All replies

  • You might find this thread interesting to read at UA;

    http://www.utteraccess.com/forum/Converting-Ipad-t1958064.html&pid=2057212&mode=threaded#entry2057212

     

    HTH,

    Daniel

    Sunday, April 10, 2011 3:16 AM
  • You cannot install your own software on the iPad. You should keep in mind that all software you install on a iPad MUST be approved by apple and you MUST go to the Apple store to install software.

     

    So, to be clear, you cannot put software on your computer and then install it on the iPad like you can with windows. You cannot go to a web site and download software onto the iPad (again, you MUST go to the Apple store).

     

    Now, windows software such as Access does not run on an Apple mac, nor does it run on your iPad either. However, at least with desktop computers and other vendors of tablet computers you are allowed to install your own software or go to a web site and install software from that web site. However, I stress again that with the iPad you cannot install software from your computer or a web site. You MUST GO TO the Apple Store to install any software and that software MUST COME from the Apple store.

     

    Keep in mind that ONLY apple approved software thus can be installed on the iPad. So it not possible to go to a web site and download games on to an iPad.

     

    So, what this means is that you can choose to write an iPad application, but to run that software you would have to in fact submit the application you write to Apple for approval when it is approved, the application would then be put in the Apple store, and then you can install that software on other iPads.  (Apple takes a cut of all purchases in that store; including your own software you placed in the store!).

     

    So, just like Android smartphone software does not work on windows desktop or the Mac desktop, the same goes for iPhone software (it only runs on Apple stuff).

     

    So, you never could really run different software systems on different platforms. However what you can do is built a 100% web based system, and then any windows desktop, or phone or in this case iPad can use that web site. So, realistic you have to build a web site using Access if you plan to use Access. Access 2010 + SharePoint (or office 365) will allow Access to build a web site, and the results will run on an iPad (in fact, I tested Access web stuff on my iPad and it works fine). In case you do not realize, Access 2010 can create web based applications now, but this does require SharePoint or the upcoming office 365.

     

    In the following video of mine, note how I switch to running Access 100% in a web browser (and that system runs on my iPad also).

     

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AU4mH0jPntI

     

    So, to be clear you cannot install any windows software such as Word or Excel or in this case Access on an iPad. And more important Apple has 100% control over what is allowed to be installed on the device and all software MUST be Approved and installed ONLY from Apple and their Store. However, you can build and write web based systems, and then use the built in web browser on the iPad.

     

    So in a round about way, yes you can use Access applications on your iPad, but you cannot install Access software on the iPad.

     

    Albert D. Kallal  (Access MVP)

    Edmonton, Alberta Canada

     

    Monday, April 11, 2011 11:12 AM
  • Albert,

    if you have an experience of building Access Web Apps, could you, please, tell me what pack of installed products should I have at my PC to do it? Access 2010 + SharePoint Server or smth else?

    As far as I know more than others about Claude's app I can say that it will be a huge task to rebuild it to be web compatible. But (remembering the code involved) it is possibe. The questions are:

    1. Where to host this web application?

    2. Does the end justify the means?


    Andrey V Artemyev | Saint-Petersburg, Russia
    Monday, April 11, 2011 12:21 PM
  • > please, tell me what pack of installed products should I have at my PC to do it? Access 2010 + SharePoint Server or smth else? 

     

    You do not need any software then Access 2010 installed on your computer to build a web application. The basic starting process here is that you must however create a web based application.

     

    Access is quite nice in that you can do the web development without any additional web tools installed on your computer. I suppose eventually you want to see your stuff run in a web browser. Unlike many web development systems which require setup of a web server, setup of a database server etc, you do not need to do this with Access.

     

    Worse in those other systems to write server side code you have to learn the database server programming language to create store procedures. And you often have to learn how to manage and create tables also. Web development tends to be difficult because of needing to learn so many different systems and then learning how to tie them all together.

     

    I mean if you use asp.net and Oracle, then your ONLY hosting choice will be those vendors that support asp.net, and Oracle. If just one part is wrong (such as wrong web server, wrong database server, wrong programming lanauges installed on that host, then you have to choose a different hosting provider). So, I not really aware of any system that just lets you publish to any hosting provider (all requite that you have the exact matched systems from web server to database server to programming lanauges supported – Access web is no different in this regards).

     

    So, with Access you do not need to setup any server database or web server or even install any additional software on your PC to get going.

     

    On the other hand, you will eventually want to have a server with what is called Access Web Services (AWS) running to publish that database.

     

    >1. Where to host this web application?

     

    Right now you need SharePoint. So, you have to pick one of MANY SharePoint hosting providers (there is a lot of them these days). However, a real issue is that you must be using SharePoint 2010 and you must be using the Enterprise edition. A bing of SharePoint hosting will produce more hits then you care to read.

     

    You can also use www.accesshosting.com which is tailored to Access.

     

    One of the best upcoming choices will be when office 365 comes out. This cloud based edition of office will also support Access Web Services (AWS) and thus will support publishing of your Access web applications written in 2010. I am using it right now.

     

    Keep in mind since AWS requires SharePoint enterprise (not foundation), then this quite much means this choice only really applies to those already with SharePoint untill 365 comes out.

     

    >2. Does the end justify the means?

     

    It depends on what you attempting to do. You are in effect adopting SharePoint. So, just like no one would go out to purchase Oracle to use with Access as a client, the same goes for SharePoint. In other words, if the company is using or is going to adopt SharePoint, then Access Web Services (AWS) then makes sense. And in these cases, you talking about a intranet, not public facing site. However, just like no one goes out to purchase and setup Oracle with Access, the same applies to SharePoint. (it cannot be cost justified for use with just Access. On the other hand SharePoint is a great way to start moving typical office and business process to the web.

     

    The great part about AWS is that all of the logon and security is handled by SharePoint. It is simply not practical in most systems these days to attempt to write + build + design the security and logon system (it would cost many times more than your application).

     

     

    Albert D. Kallal  (Access MVP)

    Edmonton, Alberta Canada

    Monday, April 11, 2011 1:19 PM
  • Albert, thanks a lot! And some comments:

    0. As I understand I should only have Access 2010 to build and test my web-db. But if I want to publish this db so the others may use it I should have an AWS hosting provider or my own SP Server 2010 Enterprise. I think I should try it on my own to completely understand all the development process.

    1. I've been waiting for Office 365 for some monthes and believe it would be a wonderful servive, next generation for business. As I was said by some folks from MS, it will be available in Russia till the end of 2011. And it's nice to hear that AWS is also included.

    2. This question was more addressed to Claude, as for me, of course, I understand that it's a bad idea to buy a highway road if you've already bought a car and want to drive it on. :) Security side of this question is also perfect! Especially if we go to the Web where it is a more difficult task.

    Claudetold you about your app and iPad with one remark (smth like iPad with *normal* OS installed). I hope you now understand why I put this remark. :) And can you tell us, what was the first idea? You've almost completed with your app, but I think you've been already thinking about the platform it would use. If you finally understand that iPad doesn't meet your needs how will you use your application?


    Andrey V Artemyev | Saint-Petersburg, Russia
    Monday, April 11, 2011 1:56 PM
  • Good evening gentlemen,

    My aplication as you know Andrey is a electronic cash register that does not only the regular work of a cash register, but also, handle all the accounting tasks behind the scene as well as inventory, purchases and marketing.

    The idea of Ipad was just for the restauration part of Auto-Caisse to enable waiters and waitresses to take orders using that device, but many devices can be use for that purpose, so I do not stress over that.

    As to put my application on the web, I am studying Windows Azure and I can see it run using that media. I have already begun the web compatibility and it's not that bad, I am struggling with some macros and code but it's taking place slowly but surely.

    I read carefully the comments of Albert and I understand perfectly how it's work now...

    Thanks Albert.

    Take care Andrey

    I put a new discussion on a small problem, if you want to look at it, you might know the answer.

    Claude

     


    Claude Larocque
    Tuesday, April 12, 2011 2:30 AM
  • So, what this means is that you can choose to write an iPad application, but to run that software you would have to in fact submit the application you write to Apple for approval when it is approved, the application would then be put in the Apple store, and then you can install that software on other iPads.  (Apple takes a cut of all purchases in that store; including your own software you placed in the store!)

     

    Up to 100 devices used for development can be loaded with your app.  No need to go through app store approval or to pay to distribute your app.  The downside is that every 90 days the developer certificate on the development device must be renewed, but this is simple to do and only requires connecting the device to the mac running the development tools and installing the new cert.  For those with larger companies with a DUNS number and don't want to renew developer certificates on deployment devices there's the iOS Developer Enterprise program https://developer.apple.com/programs/ios/enterprise/



    Thursday, July 19, 2012 11:52 AM
  • Hum, ok, I guess they want $300 per year to do this.

    To be fair, at least this is a road to avoid having to deploy through the app store.

    And I suppose you could avoid the Enterprise program, and deploy to each unit as a developer (but updating bug fixes to 100 pads in the field would be nightmare with this idea - you have to physical hook up each one to the dev computer).

    So there are new choices since this post was made – it would be nice if the update to the software could be included with the client application. So this is some improvement, but certainly less than ideal for a lot of small businesses.

    Albert D. Kallal (Access MVP)
    Edmonton, Alberta Canada

    Friday, July 20, 2012 4:55 AM
  • How about using "Cellica Database" for building your mobile solution in short time?
    Wednesday, November 21, 2012 11:43 AM