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MS Project 2010 - How to use 24 Hour Calendars

    Question

  • I haven’t had to use a resource like this in my past, so I wanted to enlist everyone’s help on how best to demonstrate this particular resource. Here is an example:

    We have a resource called CPU. It works 24 hours per day, 7 days a week. It has a total (Max Units) of 5,000 available to use. If all CPU’s were used in one day, it would have used (produced) 120,000 hours. (5,000 X 24)

    We want to be able to do demonstrate two things:

    If a task is 600,000 hours of work and I apply the CPU resource at full capacity (5,000), show me how many days it will take to complete the task. (It should be 5 days)

    Or, if his task is 600,000 hours but I only have half of my Max Units, (2,500) show me how many days it will take. (It should be 10 days)

    Can anyone give an example of how to demonstrate this properly?

    It seems so simple so perhaps I’m missing something. I tried this exercise with the Resource calendar set to 24hr, the Task calendar set to 24hr and the Project calendar set to 24hr. No luck. I see some unexpected behavior. For example, the Finish dates exceed my expected date. On the Resource Usage view, I should see my 24hrs per day for that task contained within each day, but I do not. I see the 24hrs sometimes spread out over different days (16 and 8 for example).

    Let me know what you think. As always, I appreciate the help.

    Chris


    Chris Addis - MCTS T. Rowe Price
    Monday, June 20, 2011 11:07 PM

Answers

  • Chris --

    Nice to hear from you!  And thanks for asking an intriguing question.  :) Here is how I would demonstrate this:

    1.  Create a new project and then click File > Options > General.  In the Project Options dialog, set the Date Format value to 1/28/09 12:33 PM.  You need to do this so that you can confirm that the schedule of every task is correct.

    2.  In the Project Options dialog, click the Schedule tab.  Set the Default Start Time value to 12:00 AM and set the Default End Time value to 12:00 AM. Set the Hours Per Day value to 24 hours and set the Hours Per Week value to 168 hours.  Click the OK button when finished.  You need to do this step to synchronize your 24 Hours calendar with the Project Options settings in your project.

    3.  Click Project > Project Information.  In the Project Information dialog, set the Start date of the project in the Project Information dialog to any date, but then APPEND the time 12:00 AM at the end of the date in the Start field.  Click the Calendar pick list, select the 24 Hours calendar, and then click the OK button.  You need to do this to get the 24 Hours calendar to work as you desire by setting the Start time of the project to the start time of the 24 Hours calendar.

    4.  Double-click the Timescale bar at the top of the Gantt Chart and then click the Non-Working Time tab.  Click the Calendar pick list, select the 24 Hours calendar again, and then click the OK button.  You need to do this step to make sure you see the correct schedule in the Gantt Chart.

    5.  Display the Resource Sheet view and create the CPU resource with a Max. Units value of 500,000% to represent 5,000 CPUs.  Remember 1 CPU equals 100%, so 5,000 CPUs should equal 5,000 x 100%, which equals 500,000%.

    6.  Redisplay the Gantt Chart view and then drag the split bar to the right side of the Finish column and then widen the Start and Finish columns as needed.

    7.  Click the Format ribbon and select the Project Summary Task option in the Show/Hide section of the Format ribbon.  In the Start and Finish columns for the Project Summary Task (Row 0), you should see 12:00 AM appended to the date.

    8.  Add a new Auto Scheduled task (NOT Manually Scheduled) to your project and leave the Duration at the default value of 1 day.

    9.  Click the View ribbon and then select the Details checkbox in the Split View section of the View ribbon.  This displays the Task Entry view.  Select the new task added in step #8.

    10.  In the Task Form pane, assign the CPU resource at 500,000% Units and 600,000 hours and then click the OK button.  Microsoft Project 2010 will calculate the Duration at 5 days.

    11.  In the Task Form pane, change the Units value for the CPU resource to 250,000% and then click the OK button.  Microsoft Project 2010 will calculate the new Duration at 10 days.

    12.  In the View ribbon, DESELECT the Details checkbox to close the Task Form pane and return to the Gantt Chart view.

    13.  Apply either the Task Usage view or the Resource Usage view.  In the timephased grid, you should see the Work applied correctly from the first day of the project.

    Hope this helps.


    Dale A. Howard [MVP]
    VP of Educational Services
    msProjectExperts
    http://www.msprojectexperts.com
    http://www.projectserverexperts.com
    "We write the books on Project Server"

    Tuesday, June 21, 2011 1:28 AM

All replies

  • Chris --

    Nice to hear from you!  And thanks for asking an intriguing question.  :) Here is how I would demonstrate this:

    1.  Create a new project and then click File > Options > General.  In the Project Options dialog, set the Date Format value to 1/28/09 12:33 PM.  You need to do this so that you can confirm that the schedule of every task is correct.

    2.  In the Project Options dialog, click the Schedule tab.  Set the Default Start Time value to 12:00 AM and set the Default End Time value to 12:00 AM. Set the Hours Per Day value to 24 hours and set the Hours Per Week value to 168 hours.  Click the OK button when finished.  You need to do this step to synchronize your 24 Hours calendar with the Project Options settings in your project.

    3.  Click Project > Project Information.  In the Project Information dialog, set the Start date of the project in the Project Information dialog to any date, but then APPEND the time 12:00 AM at the end of the date in the Start field.  Click the Calendar pick list, select the 24 Hours calendar, and then click the OK button.  You need to do this to get the 24 Hours calendar to work as you desire by setting the Start time of the project to the start time of the 24 Hours calendar.

    4.  Double-click the Timescale bar at the top of the Gantt Chart and then click the Non-Working Time tab.  Click the Calendar pick list, select the 24 Hours calendar again, and then click the OK button.  You need to do this step to make sure you see the correct schedule in the Gantt Chart.

    5.  Display the Resource Sheet view and create the CPU resource with a Max. Units value of 500,000% to represent 5,000 CPUs.  Remember 1 CPU equals 100%, so 5,000 CPUs should equal 5,000 x 100%, which equals 500,000%.

    6.  Redisplay the Gantt Chart view and then drag the split bar to the right side of the Finish column and then widen the Start and Finish columns as needed.

    7.  Click the Format ribbon and select the Project Summary Task option in the Show/Hide section of the Format ribbon.  In the Start and Finish columns for the Project Summary Task (Row 0), you should see 12:00 AM appended to the date.

    8.  Add a new Auto Scheduled task (NOT Manually Scheduled) to your project and leave the Duration at the default value of 1 day.

    9.  Click the View ribbon and then select the Details checkbox in the Split View section of the View ribbon.  This displays the Task Entry view.  Select the new task added in step #8.

    10.  In the Task Form pane, assign the CPU resource at 500,000% Units and 600,000 hours and then click the OK button.  Microsoft Project 2010 will calculate the Duration at 5 days.

    11.  In the Task Form pane, change the Units value for the CPU resource to 250,000% and then click the OK button.  Microsoft Project 2010 will calculate the new Duration at 10 days.

    12.  In the View ribbon, DESELECT the Details checkbox to close the Task Form pane and return to the Gantt Chart view.

    13.  Apply either the Task Usage view or the Resource Usage view.  In the timephased grid, you should see the Work applied correctly from the first day of the project.

    Hope this helps.


    Dale A. Howard [MVP]
    VP of Educational Services
    msProjectExperts
    http://www.msprojectexperts.com
    http://www.projectserverexperts.com
    "We write the books on Project Server"

    Tuesday, June 21, 2011 1:28 AM
  • Dale,

    Nice to hear from you as well. 

    Thank you very much for the response. Very nice work, this solution works and works properly.  I’ll mark it as the answer and present it to the client as the solution to their CPU resource.  In addition to your instructions, I added the step of changing the way Max Units was displayed from Percentage to Decimal (Project Options > Schedule > Show assignment units as a:).  This allows the user to input numbers that are visually understandable, like 5,000.

    Since I’ve got your attention…in a semi related question:

    1. Is there a way to apply a cost per hour to a resource (the CPU we spoke of) with a value less than the default two decimal places?  It’s my understanding that the smallest rate value per hour we can use for a resource is .01.  Have you seen a way to add a value of something like .0001 per hour?
    2. How have you approached a daily, weekly or monthly cost resources?  For example:  I have a resource that costs $100 per day to use.  The task is 5 days long.  I apply the resource to the task, thus incurring $500 in cost.  Cost Per Use doesn’t quite work, does it?

    Again, thanks so much for the help.

     

    Chris


    Chris Addis - MCTS T. Rowe Price
    Tuesday, June 21, 2011 2:33 PM
  • Chris --

    Your change to the "Show assignment units as" option to Decimal is a good one, and makes more sense than the Percentage option.  Regarding your other questions:

    1.  Nope, the smallest Standard Cost unit you can use is 1 cent.  However, why don't you use a custom Cost field that has a formula which divides the current Cost amount for each task by 100.  I realize that solution would not show you timephased cost information for the custom field, but it would at least show you cost at a lower cost rate.

    2.  If you are actually using Cost resources, you need to manually enter the cost amount in the Cost column.  Cost Per Use is like the trip charge that you pay the plumber when he/she shows up at your door.  When you get the final bill for the plumber's work, there is a trip charge fee plus the numbers of hours worked at the plumber's billing rate.  So, Cost Per Use is not what you would use.


    Dale A. Howard [MVP]
    VP of Educational Services
    msProjectExperts
    http://www.msprojectexperts.com
    http://www.projectserverexperts.com
    "We write the books on Project Server"

    Tuesday, June 21, 2011 3:27 PM
  • Here are my solutions to the two problems posed in this thread.

    Duration display challenge:

    1. Create a custom task text field called "Friendly Duration."
    2. Formula: ProjDateDiff(Start,Finish,[Project Calendar])/[Minutes Per Day] & " days"
    3. Ensure that hours per day (in File > Options > Schedule) are set to match the Project calendar.

    This solution does not require you to change the Project calendar and other settings just for the sake of one type of resource -- the tail wagging the dog as it were.

     

    Fractional cents rate challenge:

    1. Edit the CPU resource in Project Professional (not in PWA).
    2. Use a weekly rate instead of an hourly rate.

    Notes:
    To determine the value to use for the weekly rate, multiply the hourly rate by the Hours per week (as set in File > Options > Schedule).
    So, if Hours per week = 40, and the hourly rate for CPU is $0.001, enter $0.04/week as the rate.

    Do not edit this resource in PWA.  PWA only displays rates/hr, and if you edit in PWA, the weekly rate wil be converted to a rate/hr and rounded to the nearest cent, thus re-creating the original problem.


    Reid McTaggart Partner DeltaBahn LLC
    Wednesday, August 31, 2011 2:00 PM
  • Dear All,

    I would be grateful if someone could assist me with a slight dilemma I am currently facing using MS Project 2007 - (if you give me advise on using MS Project 2010, it would be fine).

    I am producing a comprehensive programme using MS Project.

    The project will be running 24 hours a day - 7 days a week.

    There will be three Engineers working on site per shift of 12 hours. So in effect: 2 X 12 hours shifts per day, 7 days a week. The duration of the project is 8 week starting 9th Sept 12.

    I have been struggling very much to capture this in the programme.

    Can you kindly assist me? I have tried many ways to do this, but MS Project wont show working time for the duration of the project.

    Can you please let me know how to set up the sheet to allow me to do this? If there is an example on line, or you may have one, I would very much appreciate it if you assist me.

    Many thanks

    Best Regards

    Sunday, June 24, 2012 11:56 AM
  • Hello M.Rickaby,

    I would kindly suggest you consider starting a new thread. This one has already been closed, so you may not get proper attention. Sometimes the forum moderators split the thread.

    Regards.

    Sunday, June 24, 2012 3:43 PM
  • Create 3 calendars:

    24/7

    Night Shift (say 12:00 AM-12:00 PM)

    Day Shift (say 12:00 PM-12:00 AM)

    Optional:  Change project schedule options to:

    Default start time 12:00 AM
    Default end time 12:00 AM
    Hours per day 24
    Hours per week 168

    Set your task to Fixed Work
    Set work to 1344 hours (8weeks*7 days per week*24 hours per day)
    Associate the Day shift calendar with engineers working the day shift
    Associate the Night shift calendar with engineers working the night shift
    Assign the 24 hour calendar to the task


    Assign a Day shift engineer and a Night shift engineer to the task.

    Look at the Task Usage view and you will see that each engineer is assigned 677 hours of work, and each is working 12 hours per day, acording to their shift.


    Reid McTaggart – DeltaBahn Vice President
    Blog | Twitter | LinkedIn

    Monday, June 25, 2012 2:11 PM
  • Here's more info using a 24 hour calendar for a task:

    http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/project-help/add-a-calendar-to-a-task-HA102840095.aspx?CTT=1


    The fish guy

    Thursday, March 07, 2013 12:00 AM