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HOWTO: Create a Bootable Universal Flash Drive (UFD) with Windows Developer Preview / Install Windows 8 From a USB Stick

    Question

  • Hello!

    I am trying to install Windows Developer Preview from a UFD because I do not have a DVD drive here. I am using the following procedure.

     

    1. Firstly, I prepare the USB stick via diskpart:

    DISKPART


    LIST DISK


    SELECT DISK 1


    CLEAN


    CREATE PARTITION PRIMARY


    SELECT PARTITION 1


    ACTIVE


    FORMAT FS=NTFS


    ASSIGN


    EXIT


     

     

    2. Secondly, I add the boot code to the USB stick (supposing that flash is my F: drive and mounted Windows Developer Preview DVD is my X: drive):

    X:\BOOT\>BOOTSECT.EXE /NT60 F:

    3. Finally, I copy contents from the mounted ISO with Windows Developer Preview to this flash drive just like specified here:

    c:>xcopy x:\*.* /s /e /f f:\

    However, when I restart the computer, press F8 on my ASUS motherboard for the boot menu to popup and choose the prepared Transcend 16GB flash drive, I get

    Disk error ocurred.
    
    Press Ctrl+Alt+Del to reboot.

    I am sure the flash drive is bootable, because trying to boot from it without having any files from Windows Developer Preview distribution on it returns

    No boot manager found.

    Any clues?

    Thank you in advance.


    Well this is the world we live in And these are the hands we're given...
    Monday, September 19, 2011 8:29 AM

Answers

All replies

  • I think the Devloper preview requires Windows 7 to install so if you dual boot Windows 7 (install Twice on two partitions) you can then run that USB drive on one copy and all should be ok...

     

    I just down a clean install then run the dev preview from windows 7 and install ok...


    Tehcnical Beta Tester || Matthew John Earley BSc (hons) || www.o0MattE0o.myby.co.uk
    • Edited by o0MattE0o Monday, September 19, 2011 8:35 AM
    Monday, September 19, 2011 8:34 AM
  • I was able to install win8 from a UFD using this tool (http://wudt.codeplex.com/). Just point to the *.iso file and it makes all the work for you.

     

    leo

    • Proposed as answer by Lord Zarquon Monday, September 19, 2011 9:44 AM
    • Unproposed as answer by Exotic Hadron Monday, September 19, 2011 10:36 AM
    Monday, September 19, 2011 8:55 AM
  • I think the Devloper preview requires Windows 7 to install so if you dual boot Windows 7 (install Twice on two partitions) you can then run that USB drive on one copy and all should be ok...

     

    I just down a clean install then run the dev preview from windows 7 and install ok...


    Tehcnical Beta Tester || Matthew John Earley BSc (hons) || www.o0MattE0o.myby.co.uk

    The thing is I want to boot into VHD. Second, I am panicky about that drive letter stuff and want to avoid messing with it (as it often the case setup may mess with drive letters as their assignments in OS may differ from those in BIOS).


    Well this is the world we live in And these are the hands we're given...
    Monday, September 19, 2011 10:29 AM
  • I was able to install win8 from a UFD using this tool (http://wudt.codeplex.com/). Just point to the *.iso file and it makes all the work for you.

     

    leo

    Thanks! I'll try it. One of the reasons, I want a UFD is recovery. This thing may help a lot.

    According to the following information, this tool does not work for 32-bit setups.

    Still, if anyone knows why the procedure above may not work, please don't hesitate to give your suggestions.

    Thank you!


    Well this is the world we live in And these are the hands we're given...

    Monday, September 19, 2011 10:30 AM
  • For you first try did you try mounting a Windows 7 DVD and use that for doing the command "BOOTSECT.EXE /NT60 F:"


    Tehcnical Beta Tester || Matthew John Earley BSc (hons) || www.o0MattE0o.myby.co.uk
    Monday, September 19, 2011 1:38 PM
  • For you first try did you try mounting a Windows 7 DVD and use that for doing the command "BOOTSECT.EXE /NT60 F:"


    Tehcnical Beta Tester || Matthew John Earley BSc (hons) || www.o0MattE0o.myby.co.uk
    I used the bootsect that is shipped with Windows Developer Preview distribution because it's the same you get with Windows 7 distribution.
    Well this is the world we live in And these are the hands we're given...
    Monday, September 19, 2011 2:52 PM
    • Marked as answer by Exotic Hadron Tuesday, September 20, 2011 10:19 AM
    Monday, September 19, 2011 3:02 PM
  • Use this to create a USB boot  : http://www.microsoftstore.com/store/msstore/html/pbPage.Help_Win7_usbdvd_dwnTool


    vorig
    That's what I finally chose and it worked! But the question is what to do when you need to install a 32-bit Windows Developer Preview, and much more why the suggested method of formatting, patching the boot sector and copying the bootmgr and all setup files did not work!
    Well this is the world we live in And these are the hands we're given...
    Monday, September 19, 2011 3:10 PM
  • Okay I finally got the OS (64-bit flavor; I still don't know what to do with 32-bit option) installed. Thank you everybody and especially to Scott Hanselman.

    I'll add a notice, maybe this will save a couple of minutes to the other.

    The thing is: I firstly tried to use an existing VHD that I used to use under Hyper-V. That was a 500 Gbyte expandable VHD formatted and compress with NTFS. The VHD had had a Windows Developer Preview setup, which had been sysprep'ed by me.

    1. I prepared the bootable USB stick (a Universal Flash Drive) using the Windows 7 USB/DVD Download Tool. Typical solution suggested by Burke didn't work for me. (Anyways, thanks a lot, dude! I did't know you can patch the boot sector!)

    2. The UFD booted nicely into the Windows 8 setup.

    3. I chose to use existing VHD by pressing SHIFT+F10 and typing at the command prompt:

    C:>diskpart
    DISKPART>select vdisk file=d:\vm\win8\win8.vhd
    DISKPART>attach vdisk

    I proceeded with setup and got a message that setup discovered an existing Windows installation on the disk. Heck, I expected a re-install or a quick update when it finished with complete fresh install and renaming of existing Windows folder. 

    Okay, I went further, waited until the reboot and...

    Bummers!
    The Windows Developer Preview label appeared for a minute on the screen and... a second after a shiny new blue screen of death grinning with a smile and VHD_NOT_ENOUGH_DISK_SPACE (or similar).

    That has driven me mad because I couldn't get out of this error since MSFT decided (as it had been before) to set zero-second delay for the Windows 8 boot record in the boot menu. (By the way, any clue how to resolve this problem?)

    4. I finally decided to install to a new VHD and tried to create a new one using this:

    D:\cd /d d:\vm\
    D:\vm>mkdir d:\vm\wdp\
    E:>diskpart
    DISKPART>create vdisk file=d:\vm\wdp\wpd.vhd type=expandable maximum=60000
    


    and... I got this (I can't reproduce the exact message):
    Cannot create a virtual disk. Virtual disk should require a NTFS disk that should not be compressed or encrypted.

    Heck my D:\ drive is compressed but D:\vm is has compression attribute unchecked so that mkdir should've created an uncompressed folder. Seems like it did not!

    I ended up with 

    compact /U /S /A "D:\vm\wdp\" 

    to set NTFS compression off. Eventually it cleared compression bit from all the folders under D:\VM\... But it worked! Once I did so, the diskpart created virtual disk with no problem.

    After I created a new blank VHD, setup ran flawless.

    For anyone else who, like me, didn't know for lack of support for NTFS compression, please be aware that

    "Using compressed or encrypted VHDs for native boot. VHDs that have been compressed by NTFS or encrypted using Encrypting File System on the host volume are not supported for native boot."



    Does anybody know how to edit the new Windows 8 boot menu? I have remnants of obsolete Windows 8 boot records there that are not needed any longer.
    I know you can do that with bcdedit /d but I hesitate to run it.

     

    If there's no other way to edit it but using bcdedit, do I understand it right that I should use the bcdedit from under the Windows 8 environment? What if I run it under Windows Server 2008 R2 session? I think that would quirck the boot menu completely and brick the boot, am I right?

    Thank you everybody!


    Well this is the world we live in And these are the hands we're given...
    Monday, September 19, 2011 3:48 PM
  • I was only giving differnt options because for me that tool only works with USB Pen drives and not USB External HDD which show up as Hard Disk Drives in Windows 7...
    Tehcnical Beta Tester || Matthew John Earley BSc (hons) || www.o0MattE0o.myby.co.uk
    Monday, September 19, 2011 3:50 PM
  • I was only giving differnt options because for me that tool only works with USB Pen drives and not USB External HDD which show up as Hard Disk Drives in Windows 7...
    Tehcnical Beta Tester || Matthew John Earley BSc (hons) || www.o0MattE0o.myby.co.uk
    Yeah, understood. Thank you for your help! You helped a lot! If you happen to know how to deal with 32-bit, could you please share the solution here?
    Well this is the world we live in And these are the hands we're given...
    Monday, September 19, 2011 3:57 PM
  • It should not be any differnt? (Remeber the Bootsect.exe has to be from a 32-bit DVD)

    I would install Virtual Box/VMWare Workstation 8/Hyper-V on a PC and create a new Virtual PC and point it to that 32-bit DVD and see if the DVD has been downloaded correctly and take it from there...


    Tehcnical Beta Tester || Matthew John Earley BSc (hons) || www.o0MattE0o.myby.co.uk
    • Edited by o0MattE0o Tuesday, September 20, 2011 10:51 AM
    Tuesday, September 20, 2011 10:50 AM
  • They say, installing 64-bit flavor of WDP with the dual boot with 32-bit Windows 7 will not work if you try to create a boot UFD using the Windows 7 USB/DVD Download Tool. Maybe...
    Well this is the world we live in And these are the hands we're given...
    Tuesday, September 20, 2011 10:56 AM
  • I would Install Windows 7 32-bit or 64-bit, then go to disk manager and create a new partition (can be done while installing windows 7) once up and running and all good... Install Windows 8 as normal choosing DVD or diskpart way and choose the second partition you created and Windows 8 should detect Windows 7 and set up the dual boot (even though Windows 8 boots first then lets you choose a OS to boot????)

    Booting from a VHD file is ok but remember that Windows 8 uses low level features, this is why you can't install it on VMware Workstation 7... I would just partition the Hard Disk Drive



    As for Boot menu not looked into it have you gone to MSCONFIG and select boot tab, this is how you do it in windows 7 and can’t see why it should change? but it might of?


    Tehcnical Beta Tester || Matthew John Earley BSc (hons) || www.o0MattE0o.myby.co.uk
    Tuesday, September 20, 2011 11:35 AM
  • On Tue, 20 Sep 2011 11:35:31 +0000, o0MattE0o wrote:

    Booting from a VHD file is ok but remember that Windows 8 uses low level features, this is why you can't install it on VMware Workstation 7... I would just partition the Hard Disk Drive

    You're confusing booting from a VHD with virtualization. Booting from a VHD
    does not use virtualization, like booting from a hard drive it directly
    uses your computer's physical devices, not virtualized or emulated devices.


    Paul Adare
    MVP - Identity Lifecycle Manager
    http://www.identit.ca
    Closed loop: A method of execution no longer in vogue except in Iran.

    Tuesday, September 20, 2011 1:22 PM
  • Yes VHD is a form of Virtualization and you do get a little performace hit on speed, it would be far better to just partition your HDD...

    And yes you are correct that VHD native boot is designed to take advantage of physical devices but it dose not take advantage of the HDD which normally is the slowest device on most computers...


    Tehcnical Beta Tester || Matthew John Earley BSc (hons) || www.o0MattE0o.myby.co.uk
    Tuesday, September 20, 2011 2:23 PM
  • On Tue, 20 Sep 2011 14:23:17 +0000, o0MattE0o wrote:

    Yes VHD is a form of Virtualization and you do get a little performace hit on speed, it would be far better to just partition your HDD...

    No, you're wrong here, this is not a form of virtualization, in fact, you
    don't even need to have any virtualization software installed nor does your
    BIOS need to support hardware virtualization. As far as a performance hit,
    you're looking at less than 1 or 2 per cent.


    And yes you are correct that VHD native boot is designed to take advantage of physical devices but it dose not take advantage of the HDD which normally is the slowest device on most computers...

    As above, the performance hit is negligible.


    Paul Adare
    MVP - Identity Lifecycle Manager
    http://www.identit.ca
    The determined programmer can write a FORTRAN program in any language.

    Tuesday, September 20, 2011 2:36 PM
  • I already had Windows Server 2008 R2 installed on this machine before I installed the Windows 8 under Hyper-V. I firstly thought I could edit the existing BCD and point to my existing Hyper-V VHD but as I was told, obsolete BCD is no longer supported for native booting.

    I failed creating bootable flash drive using the procedure in the first post. The OS did not boot, returning 'disk error' message. Finally I solved it using the Windows 7 USB/DVD Download Tool.


    Well this is the world we live in And these are the hands we're given...
    Tuesday, September 20, 2011 3:22 PM
  • On Tue, 20 Sep 2011 14:23:17 +0000, o0MattE0o wrote:

    As above, the performance hit is negligible.


    Paul Adare
    MVP - Identity Lifecycle Manager
    http://www.identit.ca
    The determined programmer can write a FORTRAN program in any language.

    So the only pro is getting real hardware rather than using Microsoft Driver Framework, right? (Not counting RAM consumption which will be less than if you used to virtualize it under Hyper-V due to lesser footprint of Windows Developer Preview).
    Well this is the world we live in And these are the hands we're given...
    Tuesday, September 20, 2011 3:25 PM
  • On Tue, 20 Sep 2011 15:25:53 +0000, Exotic Hadron wrote:

    So the only pro is getting real hardware rather than using Microsoft Driver Framework, right? (Not counting RAM consumption which will be less than if you used to virtualize it under Hyper-V due to lesser footprint of Windows Developer Preview).

    Sorry but I really don't understand what you're asking and I'm not really
    sure that you understand exactly what is being discussed here.

    1. I don't know what you mean by the Microsoft Driver Framework.
    2. I don't understand your comment about memory consumption.


    Paul Adare
    MVP - Identity Lifecycle Manager
    http://www.identit.ca
    A bad random number generator:  1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 4.33e+67, 1, 1, 1

    Tuesday, September 20, 2011 3:33 PM
  • On Tue, 20 Sep 2011 15:22:04 +0000, Exotic Hadron wrote:

    I already had Windows Server 2008 R2 installed on this machine before I installed the Windows 8 under Hyper-V. I firstly thought I could edit the existing BCD and point to my existing Hyper-V VHD but as I was told, obsolete BCD is no longer supported for native booting.

    I failed creating bootable flash drive using the procedure in the first post. The OS did not boot, returning 'disk error' message. Finally I solved it using the?Windows 7 USB/DVD Download Tool <http://wudt.codeplex.com/releases/view/37074>.

    I'm a little confused here as there's no relationship between booting from
    a VHD and using a USB drive to perform the installation from.


    Paul Adare
    MVP - Identity Lifecycle Manager
    http://www.identit.ca
    The steady state of disks is full.  -- Ken Thompson

    Tuesday, September 20, 2011 3:34 PM
  • I am asking about the advantages of using native boot into the VHD instead of using the VHD as a part of a Hyper-V virtual machine.

    1. Under Microsoft Driver Framework I meant Microsoft Integration Services, which require Windows Driver Framework and facilitate communication via VMBus between the parent (hosting OS) and guest (hosted OSes)  partitions. Am I wrong?

    2. Regarding memory consumption. Hypervisor is responsible for memory allocation, right? While in primary partition you have VMM that does it?

    When you already have your primary partition started doesn't it mean that some memory resource are already allocated for this partition and thus will not be available to child partition?

    May I ask you to describe what exactly is being discussed here if it's not what I am thinking of? At least, if you trust MSFT, and I do, MVPs are those "who everyday promote the spirit of community by helping other people realize their potential."

    Thank you.


    Well this is the world we live in And these are the hands we're given...
    Tuesday, September 20, 2011 3:54 PM
  • On Tue, 20 Sep 2011 15:54:42 +0000, Exotic Hadron wrote:

    I am asking about the advantages of using native boot into the VHD instead of using the VHD as a part of a Hyper-V virtual machine.

    1. Under Microsoft Driver Framework I meant Microsoft Integration Services,?which?require Windows Driver Framework and facilitate communication via VMBus between the parent (hosting OS) and guest (hosted OSes) ?partitions. Am I wrong?

    2. Regarding memory consumption. Hypervisor is responsible for memory allocation, right? While in primary?partition?you have VMM that does it?

    When you already have your primary?partition?started doesn't it mean that some memory resource are already allocated for this partition and thus will not be available to child partition?

    The simple explanation here is that when you use boot from native VHD
    option then there is no virtualization or emulation involved at all. The OS
    you're booting has full and complete access to your entire set of physical
    hardware, there is no hypervisor involved at all.

    Regarding memory, of course if you boot from VHD then the OS has access to
    all installed physical memory, where if you're running from a virtual
    machine the host OS requires sufficient memory to operate so you can't
    assign all of the host's memory to the virtual machine.

    Keep in mind here that when you're talking about partitions, there's a big
    difference between the definition of that term depending on whether you're
    talking about disk partitions or hypervisor partitions.

    I think you're making this more complicated than it really is.


    Paul Adare
    MVP - Identity Lifecycle Manager
    http://www.identit.ca
    Another megabytes the dust.

    Tuesday, September 20, 2011 4:06 PM
  • Thank you for your help. I thought, when the hypervisor is installed, you can't avoid it because it sits on top of HAL (or even replaces it). I may be wrong.

    Of course I was talking about hypervisor partitions and buses.


    Well this is the world we live in And these are the hands we're given...
    Tuesday, September 20, 2011 4:34 PM