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Windows Mobile 6.1 & HDC Touch HD

    Question

  • Hi,
    I am new to windows mobile and basically I want to know how closed-source it is?Basically I want to be able to develop apllications where I would need to get at the API's. I have experience with Symbian and fear that my options for development with Windows Mobile would be severely limited. Is it as closed as Apples iPhone OS?Any help is greatly appreciated.
    Kind regards,
    Philip
    Wednesday, September 17, 2008 8:01 AM

Answers

  • The title of your entry threw me off a bit.  From looking at the title alone I could not tell that you had development questions.

     

    In my opinion Microsoft is the best company around when it comes to supporting developers. Information on the general Windows Mobile APIs are freely available to everyone; no registration or fees required.  The source code is not open, but a majority of the APIs are publically documented. You can find these APIs reference on the Windows Mobile Development Center in MSDN.  For Windows Mobile I could divide the APIs into one of 2 categories; native and managed. 

     

    If you are just starting with Windows Mobile development you will want to use the Managed APIs.  All of these APIs are implemented through .Net.  When using these APIs a lot of low level tasks such as some aspects of memory management are taken care of for you.  The Native APIs give one direct access to more of the device at the cost of less protection from one's mistakes and more effort being demanded to perform certain tasks.  Since versions of the .Net framework are supported on both the desktop and on windows mobile devices you may want to start with some simple desktop application development with .Net before developing on a Windows Mobile device.  After getting a foundation in the .Net framework pick up the book "Microsoft Mobile Development Handbook" by Andy Wigley, Daniel Moth, and Peter Foor.

     

    The bear minimum toolset that one would need to develop for Windows Mobile would be the .Net framework and one of the Windows Mobile SDKs.  These are free downloads.  However, I would strongly encourage you to invest in Visual Studio 2008 Professional.  It will provide a much more complete development environment then using the command line tools of the SDK.

     

    You usually have access to the file system of a Windows Mobile device (though some businesses or phone carriers may restrict certain areas of the device for their own security or policy reasons). giving you the ability to copy programs to the device as desired.

     

    Other sources of information include

     

     

    Wednesday, September 17, 2008 4:02 PM
  •  

    Th further answer a question that you posted in another forum (How open are the APIs?):

     

    You've got complete documentation for many of the general APIs through the resource I listed above.  There do exists some APIs that are specifically for the OEMs.  Additionally an OEM may decided to add additional functionality to their device and thus will use their own API for non-standard functionality.  A great example of this is tilt/accelerometer sensors.  Both the HTC Diamond/Touch Pro and the Samsung Omnia have these sensors, but they havedifferent APIs for them.  Since this is not standard Windows Mobile functionality Microsoft would not be the supplier of information on it.

     

    Wednesday, September 17, 2008 6:21 PM

All replies

  • The title of your entry threw me off a bit.  From looking at the title alone I could not tell that you had development questions.

     

    In my opinion Microsoft is the best company around when it comes to supporting developers. Information on the general Windows Mobile APIs are freely available to everyone; no registration or fees required.  The source code is not open, but a majority of the APIs are publically documented. You can find these APIs reference on the Windows Mobile Development Center in MSDN.  For Windows Mobile I could divide the APIs into one of 2 categories; native and managed. 

     

    If you are just starting with Windows Mobile development you will want to use the Managed APIs.  All of these APIs are implemented through .Net.  When using these APIs a lot of low level tasks such as some aspects of memory management are taken care of for you.  The Native APIs give one direct access to more of the device at the cost of less protection from one's mistakes and more effort being demanded to perform certain tasks.  Since versions of the .Net framework are supported on both the desktop and on windows mobile devices you may want to start with some simple desktop application development with .Net before developing on a Windows Mobile device.  After getting a foundation in the .Net framework pick up the book "Microsoft Mobile Development Handbook" by Andy Wigley, Daniel Moth, and Peter Foor.

     

    The bear minimum toolset that one would need to develop for Windows Mobile would be the .Net framework and one of the Windows Mobile SDKs.  These are free downloads.  However, I would strongly encourage you to invest in Visual Studio 2008 Professional.  It will provide a much more complete development environment then using the command line tools of the SDK.

     

    You usually have access to the file system of a Windows Mobile device (though some businesses or phone carriers may restrict certain areas of the device for their own security or policy reasons). giving you the ability to copy programs to the device as desired.

     

    Other sources of information include

     

     

    Wednesday, September 17, 2008 4:02 PM
  •  

    Th further answer a question that you posted in another forum (How open are the APIs?):

     

    You've got complete documentation for many of the general APIs through the resource I listed above.  There do exists some APIs that are specifically for the OEMs.  Additionally an OEM may decided to add additional functionality to their device and thus will use their own API for non-standard functionality.  A great example of this is tilt/accelerometer sensors.  Both the HTC Diamond/Touch Pro and the Samsung Omnia have these sensors, but they havedifferent APIs for them.  Since this is not standard Windows Mobile functionality Microsoft would not be the supplier of information on it.

     

    Wednesday, September 17, 2008 6:21 PM
  • Thanks so much Joel. That has been a great help. To clarify then you think that there is not much I could do on the Symbian OS that I could not do with Windows Mobile?
    Thursday, September 18, 2008 7:56 AM
  • I'm not familiar enough with the Symbian OS to give a definitive yes or no.  However, I see Windows Mobile as a platform with great potential and flexibility and I'm confident that it will be able to meet the needs of your mobile applications.

     

    Friday, September 19, 2008 2:41 AM