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How do I close programs?

    Question

  • How can I close Metro programs instead of running them in the background?
    Wednesday, September 14, 2011 6:39 AM

Answers

  • The idea is Metro Style apps are not closed.  The system takes care of keeping the apps from consuming background resources automatically.  You can examine the app lifetime information in the developer documentation if you'd like.

    Thanks very much for the question and feedback.

    Wednesday, September 14, 2011 7:00 PM

All replies

  • Dude im trying to figure that out myself.
    Wednesday, September 14, 2011 10:17 AM
  • move the mouse pointer to the bottom left corner in your screen (where teh windows start button is). You will get the option lists :)


    Akfash Latibu http://www.akfash.com http://technetbrunei.net/blogs/akfash
    Wednesday, September 14, 2011 10:46 AM
  • Press ALT+F4 :-).
    Wednesday, September 14, 2011 12:06 PM
  • Dude, there is no ALT key on the On-Screen-Keyboard ;-)

    On a serious note, we are approaching the time that you not be seeing that big X button to close apps, you will not be seeing the save file dialog etc. The system will be managing all these for you. Coming back to questing, still can't figure out how to do this in the Metro UI, I just drop to the Classic desktop and use taskmanager to close them. Taskmanager is now my friend for the time being. :)

    Wednesday, September 14, 2011 12:29 PM
  • I had troubles with this last night as well.  I dont think you "close" Metro apps in the traditional style.  Rather, there is a setting in the control panel that can set limits on the number of Apps open at one time.  Default is 3.  It appears that there is no need to close an app, Windows just cycles through them for you.  It seems to work fine with some of the apps, but the IE Metro app is another story.  
    Wednesday, September 14, 2011 12:34 PM
  • Use the Windows key to go back to the Start page (It's somewhere else on the forums, they had a list oif about four Winkey+ key commands)
    Wednesday, September 14, 2011 1:23 PM
  • The idea is Metro Style apps are not closed.  The system takes care of keeping the apps from consuming background resources automatically.  You can examine the app lifetime information in the developer documentation if you'd like.

    Thanks very much for the question and feedback.

    Wednesday, September 14, 2011 7:00 PM
  • Watch the keynote - it shows a screenshot of the Task Manager while the metro UI is running. 

    Once app1 is opened, it appears on the task manager and displays usage.  You open app2, app1 goes into "suspended" state - not using any memory or CPU usage (as if it was already closed).  After opening 10 apps, only one of them is active at any given time. 

    This is the new definition of multi-tasking...

     

    Wednesday, September 14, 2011 8:01 PM
  • To close a "Metro application", go to the Task Manager -> Processes tab, expand Applications group. Right click on the app and select End Task.

    Regards,

    --pa


    • Edited by Pavel A Wednesday, September 14, 2011 10:17 PM
    • Proposed as answer by Luis Alberto C Monday, September 26, 2011 4:26 AM
    Wednesday, September 14, 2011 10:17 PM
  • Why not allow users to close apps?

    I felt silly because I could not figure out how to close any apps.  Its such a simple action that I should be able to perform and I never considered that it was not possible.  It was too much of a hassle to use task manager to just close an application.  

    Now that I'm reading about what Microsoft is trying to do, I get it. I see what Microsoft is trying to do.  But this is not something that you can expect users to change over night.  Yes, a lot of us do have cell phones that work this way but just as many do not.

    Users need a close or kill button.  Even if all it did was suspend and hide from view (and alt+tab) the application so windows can do its thing.  As silly as it sounds, I feel like this one little missing feature will kill metro on the desktop before it even gets started. 

    I also understand this is even pre-beta, so I'll wait until RC1 before I tell my friends how silly this is in the hopes that someone will correct this oversight.

    Friday, September 16, 2011 12:54 AM
  • Desktop applications on Windows 8 can be closed just as they can be today on Windows 7.  For Metro Style applications they don't get closed but do get suspended so they are not consuming hardware resources.  Also keep in mind Metro Style applications will cover all of the screen real estate so when you switch to another Metro application then the previous Metro application is not in view (unless you have it snapped to one side or the other).

    Friday, September 16, 2011 11:28 PM
  • Even Apple lets you "Quit" an application if you want to, without resorting to killing it via a system maintenance function.

    It's just the right thing to do.  I don't want them in my Alt-Tab list.  If they're taking up room there, they're in other places as well, no matter how well you try to "freeze dry" them.

    Stop trying to justify a silly decision and make it so apps can be closed.  Be BETTER than Apple.

    -Noel

    Friday, September 16, 2011 11:33 PM
  • I use upwards of 30 apps every week just to do my job.  Dragging through the previously-launched apps one-at-a-time to get the three or four apps that I want docked (i.e., on dual monitors) would be very tedious.  Even with the demo apps, I find it annoying that I'm unable to make them go away (close them) without using the Task Manager.  Ouch!

    Saturday, September 17, 2011 12:35 AM
  • Even Apple lets you "Quit" an application if you want to, without resorting to killing it via a system maintenance function.

    It's just the right thing to do.  I don't want them in my Alt-Tab list.  If they're taking up room there, they're in other places as well, no matter how well you try to "freeze dry" them.

    Stop trying to justify a silly decision and make it so apps can be closed.  Be BETTER than Apple.

    -Noel


    TOOOTALLY Agree!

    -Anders

    Sunday, September 18, 2011 11:12 PM
  • In the Apple OS, closing apps also works via certain "magic trick", comparable to the task manager.

    If you don't want the app, unpin it from the metro screen. Done. If you have it pinned on the screen, it runs and does its chores. Very simple.

    -- pa

     

    Friday, September 23, 2011 11:38 AM
  • I have yet to hear a good reason for not including a freakin' close button on applications, just like every single application had in windows history.

    The whole suspending thing etc is probably great on a tablet and I don't mind it being there.  But windows is NOT a mobile OS.  It's a full blown pc OS that also runs on mobile devices.

    There is no reason at all to not include a close button.  None whatsoever. 

    Friday, September 23, 2011 11:44 AM
  • Howdy!

    Does anybody know HOW does Windows decide when to unload inactive (suspended) process (or task?) Is it the same Dehydration feature present in Windows Phone? If so, how it works?

    Thank you.


    Well this is the world we live in And these are the hands we're given...
    Friday, September 23, 2011 12:06 PM
  • I know that's the idea but that's not ideal. We want the ability to be able to close apps manually.
    Monday, September 26, 2011 3:59 AM
  • Yeah, I understand the idea, but I still need a way to close a program. For example, I was playing the tube rider game. When I went back to the menu the music from the game kept playing until I opened another app.
    Wednesday, September 28, 2011 1:31 AM