none
TFS 2013 tbl_Content table growth out of control

Answers

  • Thanks John

    I am aware of that command and there is probably a few old deleted branches I could run destroy over. But theoretically that should free up very little space since the source in those is only about 700 MB and should be a delta.

    The issue is more that there is something we are doing now that is causing the database to grow fast and we have no tools or insights to show us what that is. So we can't change our behaviour to compensate, whether that be the way we create workspaces, run our builds and tests, or our branch strategy. With what we are doing now, the database should not be grow as fast as it does.

    Regards

    Matthew

    Thursday, April 03, 2014 5:42 AM
  • Hi Matthew, 

    Thanks for your reply.

    As far as I know there’s no default way or tool to monitor TFS database growth and check if the growth is expect or not. For this scenario,  please submit it as a suggestion to User Voice site at: http://visualstudio.uservoice.com/forums/121579-visual-studio. Microsoft engineers will evaluate them seriously.


    We are trying to better understand customer views on social support experience, so your participation in this interview project would be greatly appreciated if you have time. Thanks for helping make community forums a great place.
    Click HERE to participate the survey.

    Monday, April 07, 2014 2:41 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Hi Matthew, 

    Thanks for your post.

    There’s a large size of source files in your TFS Source Control?


    We are trying to better understand customer views on social support experience, so your participation in this interview project would be greatly appreciated if you have time. Thanks for helping make community forums a great place.
    Click HERE to participate the survey.

    Thursday, April 03, 2014 3:34 AM
    Moderator
  • Hi John

    There is 50GB of source. I update the linked post this morning that it appears like over 100GB has been released overnight after the clean up of our unused workspaces.

    Any information on how we can interrogate TFS to determine what is using the size so we can better manage our environment would be appreciated.

    Cheers

    Matthew Rowan

    Thursday, April 03, 2014 3:39 AM
  • Hi Matthew, 

    Thanks for your post.

    There’s many deleted source files in your TFS Source Control Explorer? If yes, and you will never use that deleted source files, please execute tf destroy command to delete them from TFS Server permanently, this command belong to Team Foundation Administrators, so the Contributor users have no permission to execute it. Please refer to: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb386005.aspx.

    If users deleted files in Source Control Explorer, the files also stored in TFS DB, we can Undelete them. In VS 2013, click Tools>>Options>>Source Control>>Visual Studio Team Foundation Server, on the right panel, selected the checkbox of Show deleted items in the Source Control Explorer. Then you can see the deleted files in Source Control Explorer.


    We are trying to better understand customer views on social support experience, so your participation in this interview project would be greatly appreciated if you have time. Thanks for helping make community forums a great place.
    Click HERE to participate the survey.

    Thursday, April 03, 2014 5:36 AM
    Moderator
  • Thanks John

    I am aware of that command and there is probably a few old deleted branches I could run destroy over. But theoretically that should free up very little space since the source in those is only about 700 MB and should be a delta.

    The issue is more that there is something we are doing now that is causing the database to grow fast and we have no tools or insights to show us what that is. So we can't change our behaviour to compensate, whether that be the way we create workspaces, run our builds and tests, or our branch strategy. With what we are doing now, the database should not be grow as fast as it does.

    Regards

    Matthew

    Thursday, April 03, 2014 5:42 AM
  • Hi Matthew,

    Thanks for your reply.

    Please try to shrink your collection database. You can refer to the information in this article: http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/19932.reduce-the-size-of-tfs-databases-after-cleaning-some-source-control-files.aspx.


    We are trying to better understand customer views on social support experience, so your participation in this interview project would be greatly appreciated if you have time. Thanks for helping make community forums a great place.
    Click HERE to participate the survey.

    Thursday, April 03, 2014 6:08 AM
    Moderator
  • Hi John

    We are aware of shrinking the database now that space has been released. However, this is missing the point that TFS database growth and disk usage is unpredictable. I am just asking if there is anyway we can know how to manage the expected grow and things we can do to reduce the growth of the database.

    Regards

    Matthew

    Sunday, April 06, 2014 10:13 PM
  • Hi Matthew, 

    Thanks for your reply.

    As far as I know there’s no default way or tool to monitor TFS database growth and check if the growth is expect or not. For this scenario,  please submit it as a suggestion to User Voice site at: http://visualstudio.uservoice.com/forums/121579-visual-studio. Microsoft engineers will evaluate them seriously.


    We are trying to better understand customer views on social support experience, so your participation in this interview project would be greatly appreciated if you have time. Thanks for helping make community forums a great place.
    Click HERE to participate the survey.

    Monday, April 07, 2014 2:41 AM
    Moderator
  • hi Matthew

    are you creating lot of builds which are deleted shortly thereafter ?

    than I would recommend to monitor this thread Orphaned Build Output In the TFS 2013 Database


    Please use Mark as Answer if my post solved your problem and use Vote As Helpful if a post was useful.

    Monday, April 14, 2014 11:54 AM