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Best C# book

    Question

  • Hi!

    I'm looking for the best C# book. I already know C++.

    Which is the best according to you?

    Thanks.


    Luca
    Sunday, December 18, 2005 8:02 PM

Answers

  • Honestly, the 'best' book depends on what your goals are. Given that you already know C++, it is unlikely that a book focusing on the syntax of C# would be useful. Instead, I'd be trying to learn about the different classes in the Base Class Library and how they can be used to create various types of applications. If this sounds like what you're looking for, check out:

    Applied Microsoft .NET Framework Programming - Jeffrey Richter

    .NET Framework Standard Library Annotated Reference, Volume I and II - Brad Adams

    Essential .NET, Volume 1 - Don Box

    Keep in mind that these are all about the framework and are *not* about ASP.NET,  Windows Forms development, Web Services, .NET Remoting, etc. They are explicitly about the .NET Framework and the classes that make up the BCL.

    Hope that helps.

    Sunday, December 18, 2005 8:26 PM
  • If you are in fact looking for a book to learn the C# language, I would highly recommend Eric Gunnerson's A Programmer's Introduction to C# 2.0, Third Edition. I read the first edition many years ago and liked the fact that Eric assumed that I already knew a language like C++ or Java (which I did) and spent the time explaining how C# differs from (and improves on) the other languages. It's the best C# book that I"ve read that specifically targets folks already familiar with programming in other languages. Although I haven't read the third edition, Nick Wienholt has updated it for C# 2.0.
    Monday, December 19, 2005 5:50 AM
  • Get these in this order. . .

    Programming C# : Building .NET Applications with C# Jesse Liberty (O'Reilly 0596006993)

    Programming .Net Components Juval Löwy (O'Reilly 0596102070)

    Advanced .Net Remoting 2nd Ed. Ingo Rammar/Mario Szpuszta (Apress 1590594177)

     

    Monday, December 19, 2005 6:49 PM

All replies

  • Honestly, the 'best' book depends on what your goals are. Given that you already know C++, it is unlikely that a book focusing on the syntax of C# would be useful. Instead, I'd be trying to learn about the different classes in the Base Class Library and how they can be used to create various types of applications. If this sounds like what you're looking for, check out:

    Applied Microsoft .NET Framework Programming - Jeffrey Richter

    .NET Framework Standard Library Annotated Reference, Volume I and II - Brad Adams

    Essential .NET, Volume 1 - Don Box

    Keep in mind that these are all about the framework and are *not* about ASP.NET,  Windows Forms development, Web Services, .NET Remoting, etc. They are explicitly about the .NET Framework and the classes that make up the BCL.

    Hope that helps.

    Sunday, December 18, 2005 8:26 PM
  • If you are in fact looking for a book to learn the C# language, I would highly recommend Eric Gunnerson's A Programmer's Introduction to C# 2.0, Third Edition. I read the first edition many years ago and liked the fact that Eric assumed that I already knew a language like C++ or Java (which I did) and spent the time explaining how C# differs from (and improves on) the other languages. It's the best C# book that I"ve read that specifically targets folks already familiar with programming in other languages. Although I haven't read the third edition, Nick Wienholt has updated it for C# 2.0.
    Monday, December 19, 2005 5:50 AM
  • Ok, thanks a lot for your replies.

    I think I'll get both "A programmer's introduction to C#" and "Essential .NET Volume 1".

    Luca

    Monday, December 19, 2005 5:18 PM
  • "Essential .NET, Volume 1" by Don Box and Chris Sells is excellent if you want to know the inner workings of the .NET Framework. I loved it, but don't expect a lot of nuts-and-bolts "this is how best to use the framework" type stuff. You want to know how to implement an object-oriented run-time or why .NET (and Java) decided on a single-inheritance structure, then the book is excellent. If you want to become proficient at ADO.NET, this book isn't going to help you. I still think it's a great book, but realize what you're getting. Also note that the book was written in the .NET Framework 1.0 days and hasn't been updated, though Don has considered it. So there are a few inaccuracies, but I would still whole-heartedly recommend it if you like low-level details.
    Monday, December 19, 2005 5:25 PM
  • Get these in this order. . .

    Programming C# : Building .NET Applications with C# Jesse Liberty (O'Reilly 0596006993)

    Programming .Net Components Juval Löwy (O'Reilly 0596102070)

    Advanced .Net Remoting 2nd Ed. Ingo Rammar/Mario Szpuszta (Apress 1590594177)

     

    Monday, December 19, 2005 6:49 PM
  • Also "Programming C#" suggested by Blair Allen Stark seems very good..."A programmer's introduction to C# 2.0" vs "Programming C#": which one?
    Tuesday, December 20, 2005 1:56 PM
  • generally, I love apress books. But looking at the reviews, I might suggest against the 'Programmers Introduction'

    I highly recommend almost anything that Mr. Liberty writes.

    I also want to reiterate that Lowys' .Net Components book is a true must have!!!

    Both Liberty and Lowy also answer emails!

    Apress has a couple of new C# books this month that look promising:

    Pro .NET 2.0 Code and Design Standards in C#

    Pro .NET 2.0 Windows Forms and Custom Controls in C#

    The latter is by Matthew MacDonald and I love all his books!!!

     

     

    Tuesday, December 20, 2005 8:37 PM
  • Having never read "Programming C#" by Jesse Liberty, I can't say whether it's a good book or not, though I've heard good things about Jesse. I have personally read "A Programmer's Introduction to C#" (admittedly 1st Edition) and I loved it because it got me started with C# fast. I didn't need a long-winded explanation of the uses of an switch/case statement. Just tell me that it's basically like C/C++/Java, except you can switch on strings. Great, that's what I need to know. So for people who already know how to program well in another language, I highly recommend it. Just my 3 cents worth. (Inflation, you know.)
    Tuesday, December 20, 2005 8:42 PM
  • Ok. I've just ordered "Programming C#" by Jesse Liberty, even though it's been tough to choose. I chose that one when I read the sample chapter; I just liked the way Jesse Liberty explains the concepts and the nice and useful tip boxes for C++ programmers the author added to his book.

    Thanks to everyone who has replied in this thread.

    Luca

    Wednesday, December 21, 2005 5:03 PM
  • From my view,

    Beginning C# 3.0: An Introduction to Object Oriented Programming
    by Jack Purdum

    This book teaches you assuming you have no knowledge of programming. It is quite good for me as a beginer.
    Try the book and see.
    thx
    Thursday, September 10, 2009 8:10 PM
  • Professional C# 2008 by Wrox publishing is a good book for an experienced programmer to learn C# and some advanced topics as well. Goes for around $60.00.

    Thursday, September 10, 2009 9:02 PM
  • I think the OP might have already read some books in the intervening four years since he asked. ;)
    Friday, September 11, 2009 9:51 AM
  • If you are a beginner and want to hit the ground running, meaning start off your C# learning by building real world applications I would HIGHLY suggest C# 2008 by Murach. Here is the link. After the first chapter I actually built a practical program that my colleagues at work use on a regular basis.

    http://www.murach.com/books/cs08/index.htm


    Tuesday, February 16, 2010 12:17 AM
  • Go through " Beginning Visual C# by Karli Watson "
    Tuesday, February 16, 2010 1:09 AM
  • hey i am looking for windows services e book.Is there any idea from where i can get that.but please suggest me e-book which would be available for free....
    somillohani
    Saturday, February 04, 2012 6:45 AM
  • Try google?

    Regards David R
    ---------------------------------------------------------------
    Object-oriented programming offers a sustainable way to write spaghetti code. - Paul Graham.
    Every program eventually becomes rococo, and then rubble. - Alan Perlis
    The only valid measurement of code quality: WTFs/minute.
    Saturday, February 04, 2012 12:12 PM
  • I guess most of contributers here are verse in programming. I thought as a novice programmer I can write my experience.

    My history of programming goes back to C , C++ and perl, all limited to system proramming, writing small program to solve issues related to WPCs in Novell environment. Nevertheless I was not a programmer.

    Recently I started to get involved with PowerShell, an amazing scripting language, where it is much more undrestandable and efficient when dealing with Windows, comparing with perl, for none programmers.

    I am reading Powershell in Action and in Practice. While reading these books I realised .NET Framework, COM, , etc.. are involved. Being able to undrestand more about .Net Frame pushed me to learn C#, where it might not be essential when writing Powershell scripts.

    I have access to many C# books, e.g in the Nutshell( 3,4,5), Programming c sharp 3.0 5th edition and Head First c#.

    I started with Programming c sharp 3.0 5th edition, O'reilly.

    The point about the above books, apart from Head First, is that at the end they ,rightly, believe you are going to write  ASP.NET, Windows Forms,.. etc.. so the emphasis they put on C#, is sort of secondary.

    After all, in my case, learning a language starts with a short look at the structure and then start writing some programs and then refering to books and then at some point, when needed, looking at subjects in depth, otherwise just reading and the numerous jargons which I do not know why I need them is tiresome.

    Conclusion;

    Programming c sharp 3.0 5th edition has more comprehensive C# information with many examples. Then when I reached to Interface definition;  quite by accident, not exactly accident, I read one of the contributer's comment here, thank you! I went to,

     http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/67ef8sbd.aspx

    and I found it brilliant! better than all, perhaps for a starter that has  read half of another book, and found itself lost in many definitions. The reason the link is useful; In books they usually reach to some definitions, e.g. indexers, collection,, and then they refer to chapter, 20 or something.

    In the msdn, you can click on the new definition and read a little bit and come back. If you want to learn more, get it from the same linkor any book you have.

    Now I am reading the MSDN in regularly, and Programming c 3.0 more slowly; as I need approach.

    When I finished then any of the Nutshell, perhaps the 5.0 , for now, will be a reference for .NET Framework and perhaps C#( new facilities, since now we have 5.0),

    I hope my personal experience helps..


    • Edited by henry-ma Tuesday, November 27, 2012 4:07 PM
    Tuesday, November 27, 2012 3:59 PM