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Shape Files in Bing Maps

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  • I probably should mention that this app works offline and therefore there will be no access to the Bing Map Services anyway.
    Thursday, October 24, 2013 3:35 AM
  • Our company has basically built our own map control in Silverlight. I am currently looking at options for replacing our house-built control with an off-the-shelf control. Our requirements are:

    • Reads Esri Shape Files (from isolated storage)
    • Talks to Esri mapping services
    • Talks to WMS/WFS

    Here are some of the options

    Could anyone else please give me some tips? What's your experience with these controls? Can you recommend any other controls? Have you built your own GIS control?


    Thursday, October 24, 2013 4:10 AM
  • Thoughts?
    Thursday, October 24, 2013 11:17 PM
  • Does the Bing Maps control even attempt to support GIS in any other form that the Bing Maps services?
    Thursday, October 24, 2013 11:18 PM
  • Hi,

    According to your description, you are focus on ArcGIS API for Silverlight. In this case, I recommend you refer to the link below:

    ArcGIS API for Silverlight

    http://resources.arcgis.com/en/help/silverlight-api/concepts/index.html#/ArcGIS_API_for_Silverlight_overview/016600000006000000/

    It introduces that  “The ArcGIS API for Silverlight enables you to integrate ArcGIS Server and Bing Maps services and capabilities in a Silverlight application. You can create interactive and expressive applications leveraging ArcGIS Server and Bing Maps resources, such as maps, locators, and geoprocessing models, and Silverlight components, such as grids, tree views, and charts.”

    In addition, Alastair Aitchison has introduced his experience about it. You may refer to the followings:

    This is something I've done several times, using OS data from SQL Server in both Bing Maps AJAX and Silverlight controls. Some general comments below (in no particular order!):

    •Don't expect to implement full-blown GIS functionality using Bing Maps. Simple querying, retrieval and display of the data is all fine (+ some simple editing), but after that you'll be struggling with what can be achieved in the browser.

    •All vector shapes supplied to Bing Maps need to be in (geography) WGS85 coordinates, EPSG:4326.

    •However, all data will be projected and displayed using (projected) Spherical Mercator system, EPSG:3857.

    •In terms of vector shapes, you can expect to achieve a similar level of performance as you get in the SSMS spatial results tab - that is, (with careful architecture) you can plot up to about 5,000 features on the map at once, zoom / pan around them, click on them to bring up various properties and attributes etc. However, after that you'll find the UI becomes fairly unresponsive (which I imagine is the reason why the spatial results tabs itself limits you to displaying 5,000 records at once).

    •If you want to display more features than this, one approach is to rasterize them by projecting them into the EPSG:3857 projection, creating a .PNG/.JPG image file of the features and then cutting that image into tiles according to the Bing Maps quadkey tile numbering system as explained here:

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb259689.aspx and displaying them as a tilelayer. Tile layers are significantly faster than displaying the equivalent vector shapes, although it means the data is static.

    •If you do create raster tiles, you can either render them dynamically or pre-render them to improve performance - i.e. you could set up a job to render and update the tileset for slowly-changing data  every night/every month etc.

    •If you're talking about OS Mastermap data, the sheer level of detail involved means that you need to think more carefully about what  features you want to display, and how you want to display them. Take  greater London, for example, which covers an area about 50km x 40km. To create raster tiles (each of which are 256px x 256px) at zoom level 19  covering this area you'd need to render and store 1.3 million separate tiles. If each of those is generated from a database query that takes, say 200ms to run, it's gonna take a looooonggggg time to prepare all your data. Also, once the files have been generated, you might want to think  about storing them in a DB rather than saving them on a file system.

    •As for loading the OS data into SQL Server in the first place – there  are several tools that will import either from GML or shapefile into SQL Server, and handle the projection from EPSG:27700 (Ordnance Survey  National Grid) to WGS84 along the way. Try GDAL/OGR or Safe FME for  starters.

    I have a blog at http://alastaira.wordpress.com that has several blog posts that you may find useful describing various aspects of integrating Bing Maps and SQL Server. Particularly, you might want to look at:

    http://alastaira.wordpress.com/2011/02/16/loading-ordnance-survey-open-data-into-sql-server-2008/

    http://alastaira.wordpress.com/2011/01/23/the-google-maps-bing-maps-spherical-mercator-projection/

    http://alastaira.wordpress.com/2011/02/21/using-ogr2ogr-to-convert-reproject-and-load-spatial-data-to-sql-server/

    Hope it helps.


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    Friday, October 25, 2013 5:17 AM
  • We already use this. It doesn't meet our needs.

    My question was regarding Bing Maps.

    Friday, October 25, 2013 5:27 AM
  • Hi,

    Regarding Bing Maps, you may refer to the links below:

    ESRI Shapefiles and Bing Maps WPF

    http://rbrundritt.wordpress.com/2012/09/13/esri-shapefiles-and-bing-maps-wpf/

    Easy GIS .NET

    http://www.easygisdotnet.com/demos/BingMapsDemo.aspx

    Although they are not Silvelright application, you can refer to the method for help.


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    Monday, October 28, 2013 12:38 PM
  • The second link does not use the Bing Maps control.

    The first link is a starting point but it's pretty similar to the first link I posted. It uses the WPF version.

    I think I probably need to rephrase my question. It seems that we can access Shape Files in Bing maps.

    But...

    I don't want to use the Bing Services at all. I will need to use the coordinate system that is provided in the shape files. The problem I have at the moment is that as soon as I bring up the Bing Maps control in Silverlight its telling me that I don't have a developer account which is true because I don't want to use the Bing Maps services. I want to load data purely from ESRI Shape files and completely circumvent any interaction with the Bing Services. Is this possible?


    Tuesday, October 29, 2013 11:31 PM
  • Hi Chirstian,

    According to the discussion, the issue is more related to Bing Maps issue instead of Silverlight. I will move the thread to Bing Maps Forum for better help.

    Appreciate your understanding and support.


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    Wednesday, October 30, 2013 3:06 AM
  • Ok fair enough.

    I just need to know if the Bing Maps control will allow me to load shape files in to the control in Silverlight, and not need to talk to the Bing Map services in any way.

    Wednesday, October 30, 2013 3:12 AM
  • It looks like this thread was just moved into the Bing Maps forums. It is possible to import ShapeFiles into Bing Maps. I actually won a competition of doing this 4 years ago with the Bing Maps Silverlight control. I haven't worked with the Silverlight control in a while as all my focus has been on Windows 8 and our HTML5 control. I don't believe I published my code for my app, however I did write a couple of blog posts on the topic here:

    http://www.bing.com/blogs/site_blogs/b/maps/archive/2012/09/06/esri-shapefiles-and-bing-maps.aspx

    http://www.bing.com/blogs/site_blogs/b/maps/archive/2012/09/12/esri-shapefiles-and-bing-maps-wpf.aspx

    http://www.bing.com/blogs/site_blogs/b/maps/archive/2012/09/24/viewing-census-data-on-bing-maps.aspx

    http://www.bing.com/blogs/site_blogs/b/maps/archive/2013/06/18/how-to-load-spatial-data-from-sqlite-in-a-windows-store-app.aspx

    http://www.bing.com/blogs/site_blogs/b/maps/archive/2013/07/31/how-to-create-a-spatial-web-service-that-connects-a-database-to-bing-maps-using-ef5.aspxI'm also working on pushing out a reusable library for importing ShapeFiles into Windows 8 apps. This should be fairly easy to port to Silverlight when it's done.

    All that said, using the Bing Maps control offline is against the Terms of Use of the control, even if you are not using any of the Bing Maps imagery or data.


    http://rbrundritt.wordpress.com

    Wednesday, October 30, 2013 8:51 AM
    Owner
  • Ricky. Thanks for the info but I believe you've answered my question:

    "using the Bing Maps control offline is against the Terms of Use of the control"

    So, in other words, I can't use the Bing Maps control to do what I want to do. 

    Could I just ask - why doesn't Microsoft support using this control for services other than Bing Maps? I do understand that Bing Maps is a revenue generator for Microsoft and a necessary counterweight for Google maps. But, the area I am working in is completely different. It's for maintaining infrastructure in remote areas where there will be no internet connection.Essentially, all the components out there are either too expensive, are crap or both. Microsoft would really help to enable a lot of development if the Bing Maps control - or some similar control existed to service developers like me.


    Wednesday, October 30, 2013 9:04 AM
  • Ricky. These are also really great articles. I'm really getting mixed messages here. On one hand, using Bing Maps in offline mode sounds like it breaks the EULA. On the other hand, it seems like lots of people are doing it. What am I supposed to make of the situation?
    Wednesday, October 30, 2013 10:38 PM
  • The Bing Maps control is not allowed to be offline as this is a restriction put in place by our data providers. Microsoft has a separate mapping control which can be used offline that has a development API. It's called MapPoint: http://www.microsoft.com/mappoint/en-us/home.aspx This is heavily used by many people who need offline mapping capabilities. As a bonus, not only does it have offline maps, but it also has offline geocoding and routing.


    http://rbrundritt.wordpress.com

    Thursday, October 31, 2013 9:35 AM
    Owner
  • Ricky, this is the answer I was looking for. I don't know why this mapping control hasn't come up with all the Googling I've been doing for "Silverlight map control"
    Saturday, November 02, 2013 12:17 AM